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Best Accessories to Start With?

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Best Accessories to Start With?

Old 05-22-20, 01:23 PM
  #1  
Ubercrazyman
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Best Accessories to Start With?

Obviously, a helmet is a given. I'd also like to get a front and rear light. I'd prefer the front light to be more of a headlight type instead of just a "hey, I'm here" kind of thing. I want to also be able to see with it. Do they make those?

Also, what other accessories would you all recommend for a cycling noobie?
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Old 05-22-20, 01:40 PM
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caloso
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You need a flat kit and/or spare tube, a means of inflating, and a way to carry those things. And a mini-tool wouldn't hurt.

On my road bike, I carry:

1 tube
patch kit
tire lever
CO2 cartridge
minitool
(these all get carried in a small saddlebag)

I also carry a mini-pump, which sits in a bracket snugged up against the bottle cage.

The first flat gets a new tube and CO2. Five minutes, boom, I am on my way. Second and subsequent flats (yes, it's happened) get a patch and the pump. At that point I am already late and/or cutting short my ride.
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Old 05-22-20, 01:46 PM
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Helmet light. 300 lumens. So you light up what you are looking at. 300 lumens will light up an unlit trail at night. Rear helmet light that flashes.

Reflector straps for your wrists and ankles and a reflector vest.

Mirror. Convex but not extremely convex. If it's too convex you can't see the car approaching from behind you until it's just over your shoulder - that's too late.

Horn. Loud. Airzounds is affordable. If you can, get one that sounds like a car. I don't like the Hornit. The pitch is feeble and it's only sounds loud when you're testing it in the store or in your garage. It's feeble on the road. And get a bike bell to alert pedestrians with a friendly ring.

Camera. With resolution that can read license plates in the next lane. Enough battery power for more than an hour, preferably more than two hours. Make sure spare batteries and a separate charger are available. Make sure that camera settings like timestamp are retained when changing batteries so you don't have to reset it all the time.

Bag. Panier or trunk so you can bring stuff with you like food, rain-gear, tools, spare tube, pump etc.

U-Locks. Lock both wheels.

Eye and mouth covering like sunglasses to protect your eye and glasses from dust getting in. Mouth covering because sometimes you swallow bugs.

Have fun.
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Old 05-24-20, 06:49 AM
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Bottle cage and an under saddle tool bag for me
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Old 05-24-20, 11:00 AM
  #5  
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Originally Posted by caloso View Post
You need a flat kit and/or spare tube, a means of inflating, and a way to carry those things. And a mini-tool wouldn't hurt.

On my road bike, I carry:

1 tube
patch kit
tire lever
CO2 cartridge
minitool
(these all get carried in a small saddlebag)
One little detail extra I put in my bag: mosquito repellent. (Have you ever tried to fix a flat while swatting mosquitoes? I have.)

The little foil packets last a long time, but not forever. When I went out to get the photo below I could vaguely smell it which means the foil seal has failed. On my list for next trip to store.


Foil pack of mosquito repellent (needs to be replaced).
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Old 05-24-20, 06:44 PM
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As far as lights go, a really nice option which is highly reviewed with a very bright beam due to being an aimed beam, like a car headlight, instead of the standard flashlight type of lights, and the battery lasts a long time and is user replaceable, is the Raveman PR1200, it's only $90. Keep in mind you rarely if ever need 1,200 lumens on the road, heck cars only use 700 lumens on the road and they go faster than bikes do, so all you need to use is the middle setting which is 600 lumens...plenty for a slower moving bicycle. It's nice to have the 1,200 lumen capability because on a dark rainy night you might need the extra power. I do not own this light but I own something similar called the Phillips Saferide 80, it's designed with the same automotive cutoff beam as the Raveman but with a single LED.

Tail light wise, I own a NiteRider Omega 300, this is the best rear light I've ever found, it puts out an amazing 300 lumens which is extremely bright even in broad daylight. It has very good side visibility as well.

As far as other things, bike seat bag, I prefer Topeak Aero Wedge, but I did find a really inexpensive one made by BV on Amazon that is made of the exact same materials as the Topeak for a lot less money. Either you have to choose a size, first time bag, it's better to error on the size of large, by the time you put in a flat repair kit, levers, tube, mini tool, energy bar you'll be glad you got the larger one. Speaking of mini tools, if you're not real proficient at mechanical repairs then don't get one of those 20 or more some odd tool jobs, all you might need is some real basic tool.

Computer, just find one that has the features you want, they're all pretty decent these days. Wireless tend to have more reliability issues than a wired one and won't last half as long, but wireless look neater, but they also cost more.

People mentioned all the flat repair stuff, but the only mini pump I've used and really liked was the large size Lezyne Road Drive if you have a road bike, or the Alloy Drive if you have a bike with tires using less than 50 psi. Either of those can be had with a built in gauge. The Lezyne large road drive pump is the best mini on the market, it takes less strokes than any other and can get to over 100 psi; they make two shorter versions but keep in mind the shorter the pump the more strokes and the more effort is going to be needed. Best tire levers are either the Pedros or the Soma Steel Core levers, I have both and no issues with either, I've had the Soma for 13 years.

You'll need water bottle cages and bottles, lots of good cages just buy one that looks nice to you, I like some insulation in my bottles so I use Polar Bottles but I think Camelbak has better insulation.

Horn? or bell? no! why? because if you need a horn you probably need to stop, and using one hand to activate a warning instead of a brake doesn't make much sense to me, I would rather be stopping as fast as I can.
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Old 05-25-20, 07:13 AM
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Nice the mosquito repellent.
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Old 05-25-20, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by greatscott View Post
.. I own something similar called the Phillips Saferide 80...
I have two which I guard with my life. No longer made. Failure eventually will be the handlebar mount, not the light, which appears to have been inspired by the Sherman tank.

Good to know the Raveman is a possible future replacement.
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Old 05-26-20, 12:33 PM
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A kickstand.
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Old 05-26-20, 02:32 PM
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From the stance of having nothing bike related:
1. Helmet: even if never falling, limbs and objects hurt when striking your noggin
2. Elastic to wrap trouser legs.
3. Padded gloves.
4. Water bottle.
5. Reflective vest.
​​​​​​6. Good rear and front lights.
7. Ergonomic hand grips.
8. Sweat wicking clothing/jersey.
9. Rack and/or off-the- body bags.
10. Saddle bag w/patch kit, tools, tubes, hand pump, med kit.
​​​​​​
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Old 05-27-20, 11:45 AM
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For me the bare minimums are:

1. The means to fix a flat
2. The means to ride safely at night

Everything else can be figured out over time based on what annoyances you encounter. I haven't tried CO2 inflators, having always been fine with a little pump. And flats have gotten more rare since I've largely switched to puncture resistant tires. So I'll add one to the list:

3. Consider getting puncture resistant tires when you need new ones

Whether you expect to ride in bad weather is a personal choice, so I'll make these optional:

4. The means to ride in the rain.
5. ... to ride during the winter.
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Old 05-27-20, 06:55 PM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
2. The means to ride safely at night
Even during the day. Bright DTRLs are going to make drivers notice you.
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Old 05-28-20, 04:40 AM
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Jim from Boston
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Best Accessories to Start With?
Originally Posted by Daniel4 View Post
Mirror. Convex but not extremely convex. If it's too convex you can't see the car approaching from behind you until it's just over your shoulder - that's too late.
Only one out of 11 preceding replies recommends a rear view mirror.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I use both left and right rearview mirrors, in my case Take-a-Look eyeglass mounted ones. I got the idea from a cycling companion who used only a right hand mirror.

The additional right hand mirror affords a pretty good rearward view, but is particularly useful:...
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Old 05-28-20, 09:54 AM
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Best accessory

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Best Accessories to Start With?Only one out of 11 preceding replies recommends a rear view mirror.
Best bang for the buck, and honestly keeps you safe, is rearview mirror. Knowing what's coming up from behind if half the battle.
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Old 05-28-20, 06:26 PM
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I do like having a mirror.
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Old 05-28-20, 06:48 PM
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Totally forgot the mirror as mine is on the helmet....
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Old 05-31-20, 08:15 AM
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from my moto days > your 6 is where most danger lurks
__________________
... and so it goes
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Old 06-02-20, 04:40 AM
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I do love my bar end mirror on my road bike.
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Old 06-03-20, 05:17 PM
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the best thing is sport bottle
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Old 06-04-20, 06:23 PM
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Pencil and paper to write down your riding goals
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Old 06-07-20, 05:11 AM
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AWARENESS!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ahg6...ature=youtu.be
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Old 06-07-20, 06:06 PM
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This is the best compiled I have seen from the replies

Originally Posted by Digger Goreman View Post
From the stance of having nothing bike related:
1. Helmet: even if never falling, limbs and objects hurt when striking your noggin
2. Elastic to wrap trouser legs.
3. Padded gloves.
4. Water bottle.
5. Reflective vest.
​​​​​​6. Good rear and front lights.
7. Ergonomic hand grips.
8. Sweat wicking clothing/jersey.
9. Rack and/or off-the- body bags.
10. Saddle bag w/patch kit, tools, tubes, hand pump, med kit.
​​​​​​
​​​​​​​
​​​​​​
But it doesn't mention, phone and I.D.

Last edited by Chistophe516; 06-07-20 at 09:42 PM.
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Old 06-08-20, 10:09 AM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by Chistophe516 View Post
This is the best compiled I have seen from the replies


​​​​​​​
​​​​​​
But it doesn't mention, phone and I.D.
Thanks, Chistophe516

I.D., I guess, was assumed in my mind. I do slide a small plastic bag into the pocket of my saddle bag.

Phone? I let my wife "bogart" ours, viewing phones as distracting and "electronic leashes". I'm a bit of a Luddite in that respect.
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Old 07-09-20, 11:22 AM
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I've been trying to decide which type of mirror I wanted. I tried this one first and I'm absolutely delighted with it. It's easy to make the initial adjustment while riding and once adjusted, it stays put. Road bumps and wind don't knock it out of adjustment. This thing is great!

"Bike Peddler Take A look Mirror"
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Old 07-09-20, 01:34 PM
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I'd offer that the best safety tool is what lies between your ears. To that end, I'd recommend reading this book.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001QCY8KE...ng=UTF8&btkr=1
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