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Stowage for long ride

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Stowage for long ride

Old 06-25-20, 07:50 PM
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mcours2006
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Stowage for long ride

Two weeks ago I did a long ride with a group of eight guys, a distance of 250 km. Prior to this longest ride was 140 km. Carrying things on a 140 km ride is not an issue--repair kit in back pocket. Some bars and maybe banana.

Carrying things for a 250-km ride was a bit more tricky. I needed more fluids, more food, but managed with a large saddle bag. Yes, we stopped a few times too, but I generally like to be prepared by having enough food that I don't have to rely on convenient store stuff.

So this weekend we're doing a 320-km ride. I am contemplating using a small hydration backpack, not for water/fluids, but for just stuff. I normally commute with a backpack, but it's much, much shorter. Has anyone here done a super long ride using a backpack or hydration pack? How did it feel carrying it at the 6th hour? The 8th hour? The final hour? What's the effect on aerodynamics with the backpack? Id' be using it to carry some extra nutrition, maybe fluids, and stow layers I might shed during the ride.

Just trying to get some ideas so I can make an informed decision. This is uncharted territory for me.
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Old 06-25-20, 08:09 PM
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Doing all this in one day? No opportunity to get stuff along the way?

If you can get water along the way, then just take powdered mix for your bottles if you put your carbs in them. Snacks and food for me would probably just be dried fruits and raisins. Maybe a few granola bars, power bars, or snickers bar.

While I've never done a ride that long in one day, I'd still think I could stuff all I need in my jersey and seat bag. Assuming of course I can get water along the way.

No one to volunteer to meet you in a SAG wagon at a point or two along the way?
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Old 06-25-20, 08:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Doing all this in one day? No opportunity to get stuff along the way?

If you can get water along the way, then just take powdered mix for your bottles if you put your carbs in them. Snacks and food for me would probably just be dried fruits and raisins. Maybe a few granola bars, power bars, or snickers bar.

While I've never done a ride that long in one day, I'd still think I could stuff all I need in my jersey and seat bag. Assuming of course I can get water along the way.

No one to volunteer to meet you in a SAG wagon at a point or two along the way?

Yep, one day. I'm guessing around 13 hours total time. It's a week-after-solstice thing.

I did stuff stuff in my saddle bag, jersey pocket, even a fanny pack slung over my shoulder the last time. My issue is that I'd prefer to eat real food. I know that we're going to be stopping for fast food, but my stomach is pretty sensitive, and the last thing I want is to have stomach issues on a long ride like this.

There is someone driving a wagon, apparently, so I might think about dropping off stuff for her to bring. Just not sure about timing. I'd rather have the stuff with me, but as I said, this is uncharted territory. Just want some idea of how carrying a small bag might feel after 10 hours on the saddle.
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Old 06-25-20, 08:37 PM
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Just amazed at your low requirements. I can go through two large bottles of water in 30 minutes and eat more on hot humid days. Often times there are places to refill but other times not. I carry a backpack with extra bottles on my long rides and I have no problems with it (longest being 114miles/180km). One quirk is I immediately take it off any time I debike, any heat is tolerable while moving but not that build up after stopping. Obviously a personal issue. I know when I have to top off all of the bottles and when I can just refill one or two. Those rides include a significant amount of gravel and only 14-15mph and aero is way down on my list of concerns

Like most changes.. take a "short" ride first and give it a test.

Last edited by u235; 06-25-20 at 09:03 PM.
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Old 06-25-20, 08:43 PM
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Wearing a backpack (or hydration pack) for long distances needs a proper fit (of the bag). Straps tensioned properly and the correct length, and all that. People have used backpacks for as long as 600km audax rides, probably even longer, but the important thing is to get the fit right. I've experienced shoulder and back pain simply because one side was tensioned a little tighter than the other, which took me a quick stop to adjust and fix, but it's better to get everything right from the start than to experience and figure things out during the ride.
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Old 06-25-20, 08:45 PM
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I carry supplies in a hydration pack that I took the bladder out. It is designed to create space between your back and the back of the pack for airflow. I dont mind it. The longest I have ever rode with it is about 200km. I like using it because it leaves my jersey pockets free for food and other things that quick access is important.
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Old 06-25-20, 10:41 PM
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Quite a few folks use simple little packs on DC rides for clothing, etc..

Handlebar bag is a classic solution especially if you need to carry a lot of food.

I've done up to 140 miles with jersey pockets and a lunch stop, longer have been organized or supported.
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Old 06-26-20, 12:46 AM
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For my double century last year, I bought the biggest water bottles that would fit on my bike (800ml and 600ml, but I'm 5'2 with a 46cm frame). I had a to peak top loader to keep a couple of sandwiches, phone, and battery packs in, small saddle bag for tools, electrolytes, and spares, and shoved my pockets full of food, bars, and a couple of gels. We had a support car with more water and food, but we also stopped at petrol stations and cafes along the way to refill water and food supplies if needed. By the time we passed the 150 mile mark, none of us were particularly hungry, but still kept drinking loads of fluid. I drank 15-20 litres of fluids easily that day.
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Old 06-26-20, 02:36 AM
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For rides that length I use a small frame bag which sits at the upper forward corner of the inside triangle space. Enough space for 14hrs+. Food and other bits for the ride.

At the moment I've been filling four water bottles on the frame when I won't be able to re-fill for about 100km. This is heading into the sticks though.
Plenty of taps around for me to fill up smaller amounts, if riding through populated areas.

I still have some things in my jersey pockets, however personally I woudn't want a small backpack on the rear for that length ride.
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Old 06-26-20, 03:10 AM
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I generally find putting things on my back to be uncomfortable eventually, but know a few experienced riders who use them without issue. YMMV.

A top tube bag is really handy. Careful gear selection, lightweight gilet and arm warmers you can stuff in pockets will mean you don't need to forage in the seatbag often.
https://www.topeak.com/us/en/product.../966-toploader
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Old 06-26-20, 03:27 AM
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Originally Posted by colnago62 View Post
I carry supplies in a hydration pack that I took the bladder out. It is designed to create space between your back and the back of the pack for airflow. I dont mind it. The longest I have ever rode with it is about 200km. I like using it because it leaves my jersey pockets free for food and other things that quick access is important.
This. I tour with one, which means I am sometimes out on the road for many hours. Id definitely go with the hydration pack because they usually have a narrower profile than a standard backpack.
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Old 06-26-20, 08:17 AM
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Thanks for the responses, everyone. I am probably going to forego the backpack just because of the unknown factor. I am going to borrow a small top tube bag from a buddy for extra stowage. The backpack, while I like it, is uncharted territory for such a long ride, and then there's the aero consideration. The group expects to average ~32 kph for the whole ride, so I don't want anything that might rob me of watts.

So, a large saddle bag, a smaller top tube bag, jersey pockets, and a fanny pack slung over my shoulder but with bag tightly on the front. Should be enough stowage, and it will lighten up as the ride progresses. Hydration will be refilled along the way.

Nervous and excited at the same time. But great bunch of guys I'm riding with, and very supportive and encouraging.
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Old 06-26-20, 08:19 AM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
This. I tour with one, which means I am sometimes out on the road for many hours. Id definitely go with the hydration pack because they usually have a narrower profile than a standard backpack.
I picked up one of these just yesterday. While I do like the slim profile, it still sits up high when I'm riding on the drops. Thinking it might cost me a few watts, which I cannot afford to lose on a ride of this length and pace.
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Old 06-26-20, 08:24 AM
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Originally Posted by znomit View Post
I generally find putting things on my back to be uncomfortable eventually, but know a few experienced riders who use them without issue. YMMV.

A top tube bag is really handy. Careful gear selection, lightweight gilet and arm warmers you can stuff in pockets will mean you don't need to forage in the seatbag often.
https://www.topeak.com/us/en/product.../966-toploader
I'm borrowing one of these from a buddy:


Can't fit a ton of stuff, but maybe a USB power bank for my Garmin, some bars.
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Old 06-26-20, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by mcours2006 View Post
Thanks for the responses, everyone. I am probably going to forego the backpack just because of the unknown factor. I am going to borrow a small top tube bag from a buddy for extra stowage. The backpack, while I like it, is uncharted territory for such a long ride, and then there's the aero consideration. The group expects to average ~32 kph for the whole ride, so I don't want anything that might rob me of watts.

So, a large saddle bag, a smaller top tube bag, jersey pockets, and a fanny pack slung over my shoulder but with bag tightly on the front. Should be enough stowage, and it will lighten up as the ride progresses. Hydration will be refilled along the way.

Nervous and excited at the same time. But great bunch of guys I'm riding with, and very supportive and encouraging.



Now that sounds like uncharted territory.
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Old 06-26-20, 12:00 PM
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Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post
Now that sounds like uncharted territory.
LOL! I've tried it with it on my back, but my friend noticed that I keep my left arm stiff, apparently and unconsciously trying to keep the bag from sliding forward. Tried it in the front and it works much better. When the bag is empty I'd just use strap it around my waist. Yeah, very fred, I know.
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Old 06-27-20, 03:20 PM
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My routes all have a few water stops, so always a place to refill. Most of my rides are 75 miles max.
List:
One 24 ounce water bottle,
A PB&J sandwich in my middle jersey pocket
A basic tool bag in my left jersey....two CO2 cylinders, mini-patch kit, photo-copy of license w/emergency contacts and personal medical notes, new tube.
My phone in my right jersey pocket.
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Old 06-28-20, 12:19 PM
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On brevets with controls about every 50 miles; food and water is always available at controls, I use an Ortlieb large saddle back and two 1-liter water bottles, Zefal magnums - Amazon has them. I use a 2-liter Camelbak for hot rides where 50 miles with 2 liters won't be enough. In that case, I also carry 1 or 2 of the Zefals. My Camelbak is minimal, with water only. A Camelbak improves aero, the main reason they are not legal for racing.
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Old 06-29-20, 12:38 PM
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Thanks for all the replies,everyone. Here's an update now that the ride is done.

I ended up not using a backpack. Temperature and humidity was high yesterday right from the start, so that was a good call as a backpack would have added to the insulation on my back. I was able to stow all of with I needed, including an extra action camera, USB power bank and cable for my Garmin, and various bars and PB&J bagel sandwiches using a combination of a large saddle bag, a top-tube bag, the aforementioned fanny pack, and my jersey pockets. We had three planned scheduled stops spaced about 80-90 km apart, but we made quite a few unscheduled stops for fluids. That was absolutely crucial with the heat.

This is one of those bucket-list type rides. Some of you may be familiar with it. It's the called The Hairshirt. Here's the link: https://tbn.ca/hairshirt

Though the event was official cancelled this year due to COVID19, lots of riders like ourselves still went ahead and rode the route at the scheduled date and time.

Edit:
We finished with a total time of 11 hours and 18 minutes, averaging 31+ kph with about an hour of total stopped time.
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Old 06-29-20, 12:52 PM
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Call me impressed. I've still got the Natchez trace from one end to the other on my bucket list. Might still be a year or two since that will have to involve overnights and I'll want a covid vaccine. But only after waiting to see if the first couple rounds of vaccine don't go the way of "I Am Legend" (2007). <grin>
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Old 06-29-20, 03:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Call me impressed. I've still got the Natchez trace from one end to the other on my bucket list. Might still be a year or two since that will have to involve overnights and I'll want a covid vaccine. But only after waiting to see if the first couple rounds of vaccine don't go the way of "I Am Legend" (2007). <grin>
That's quite insane--444 miles in one go. I am curious whether there are enough pitstop along the way for you to get fluids or if you have to bring everything on your own.

I rode with a gent yesterday who did 600 km (372 miles) in 28 hours total time. The dude was long and strong on the pulls.
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Old 06-29-20, 04:15 PM
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It wouldn't be one go... at least not if one go means not stopping for sleep.

Pre-covid, there were plenty of bed & breakfast places along the way not too far off from the Trace. And there are also various campsites off the parkway. I don't know if any still exist on the Trace that are legitimately open for overnights. The Federal Park Service was shutting them down even before the current times. Water might be cut off too at the moment at the Park Service rest stops too.

Food certainly wouldn't be an issue on the Mississippi section as there are many nearby towns along the way and many convenience stores. Not as certain of the stretch in Tennessee, but doubt it's much different.

I can't decide if I want to do it fast in maybe three days or take it slow and do it in five. Probably start in Tennessee and go to Natchez. But for now it's just a bucket list item. No immediate plans. I've seen all the sites and views in the areas it runs through for many times I've had to travel by car. So a somewhat fast run just to say I did it appeals more to me at the moment.

Last edited by Iride01; 06-29-20 at 04:30 PM.
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Old 06-29-20, 09:06 PM
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Congrats! That's fast especially considering that there must be a lot of traffic controls.
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Old 06-29-20, 09:29 PM
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Impressive finish, congratulations. And yeah, heat always throws a monkey wrench into good plans.
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Old 06-30-20, 08:21 AM
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Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post
Congrats! That's fast especially considering that there must be a lot of traffic controls.
Originally Posted by atwl77 View Post
Impressive finish, congratulations. And yeah, heat always throws a monkey wrench into good plans.
Thanks. We had a really strong, good group of riders committed to staying together and finishing together, half of whom also did a 250 km ride around Lake Simcoe with me two weeks prior to this event.
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