Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Anyone on here rebuild pedals?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Anyone on here rebuild pedals?

Old 03-02-20, 12:18 PM
  #1  
robertj298 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
robertj298's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 544

Bikes: 1985 Specialized Sequoia, 1986 Miyata 912, 1987 Centurion Ironman Expert, 1988 Miyata 615, 1989 Centurion Ironman Expert

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 348 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 106 Times in 57 Posts
Anyone on here rebuild pedals?

I have a couple of my vintage bikes that need the pedals rebuilt and I would rather pay someone
to do it than to mess around getting the right tools to do it myself. I have a Miyata 615 with Sakai
SR SP-155 pedals and a Sequoia with Specialized racing pedals.
robertj298 is offline  
Old 03-02-20, 12:48 PM
  #2  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 2,510

Bikes: old school 531c & Campy

Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1068 Post(s)
Liked 742 Times in 457 Posts
I rebuild most of mine. It's pretty easy if everything is in good order. It does takes some trial and error to get it perfect.
SurferRosa is offline  
Old 03-02-20, 12:58 PM
  #3  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 6,599

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1225 Post(s)
Liked 639 Times in 437 Posts
Generally the hardest part is the limited working space to hold cones etc when adjusting.
https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-m...cone-tool.html
dedhed is online now  
Old 03-02-20, 01:25 PM
  #4  
thorstein
Senior Member
 
thorstein's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Saint Paul, MN
Posts: 80

Bikes: 1969 Raleigh Twenty, 1975 Raleigh DL-1, 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport, 1989 Schwinn Voyageur

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by robertj298 View Post
I have a couple of my vintage bikes that need the pedals rebuilt and I would rather pay someone
to do it than to mess around getting the right tools to do it myself. I have a Miyata 615 with Sakai
SR SP-155 pedals and a Sequoia with Specialized racing pedals.
I rebuilt my SP-155s around a year ago. They were the first pedals I had done. No special tools needed, the trickiest part was eliminating play, but that wasn't even very hard.

Love those pedals!
thorstein is offline  
Old 03-02-20, 01:28 PM
  #5  
davester
Senior Member
 
davester's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Berkeley CA
Posts: 1,764

Bikes: 1981 Ron Cooper, 1974 Cinelli Super Corsa, 2000 Gary Fisher Sugar 1, 1986 Miyata 710, 1983 Nishiki Cresta, 1982 Raleigh "International"

Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 530 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 88 Posts
It's no harder than rebuilding a hub. You just need a cone wrench and a dust cap removal tool (can often substitute pliers and some tape to protect the cap from the jaws).
davester is offline  
Old 03-02-20, 01:49 PM
  #6  
desconhecido 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,779
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 393 Post(s)
Liked 117 Times in 92 Posts
the SR SP155 touring pedals are among my favorite. I've rebuilt several sets and it's easy. The cap comes off with an allen wrench, 6mm I think, but maybe 5. The lock nut inside takes 10mm wrench and the cone takes a 15mm socket. There is an anti-rotation washer between the cone and the lock nut so what I do is make the cone a little tight, snug up the hex nut, put the 15mm socket on the cone (swallowing the 10mm hex) and rotate ccw to tighten the cone against the washer and lock nut. Bob's your uncle every time. The trickiest thing about these pedals is the itty bitty balls -- 1/8" I think. I believe it's the only thing I have with 1/8" balls, 5/32" is more typical, in my experience. If you're worried about losing balls or want to replace them and you want to buy some new balls before you start, each pedal takes 24 to 26 balls. I've opened up these pedals to find as few as 11 balls in a race to as many as 13. Seems that SR was not too fussy.

The Specialized pedals I've no experience with.
desconhecido is offline  
Old 03-02-20, 02:03 PM
  #7  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 18,752

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 258 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17964 Post(s)
Liked 1,647 Times in 1,203 Posts
.
...you can also use a 15mm crank bolt wrench to hold the cone, which leaves the locking nut exposed for your convenient access with almost any 10 mm socket.



3alarmer is offline  
Old 03-02-20, 03:44 PM
  #8  
Velo Mule
Senior Member
 
Velo Mule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 789

Bikes: Trek 800 x 2, Schwinn Heavy Duti, Electra Cantilever, Schwinn Traveler, Schwinn Le Tour Luxe, Schwinn World

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 233 Post(s)
Liked 132 Times in 110 Posts
While all of your suggestions are correct, they are not what Robertj is looking for. He wants to pay someone to rebuild them for him. This is a possible business opportunity. Perhaps the Freewheel Spa might expand into doing another component with small ball bearings. It would seem to be a natural fit. PastorBob??

Perhaps a BikeForum member might want to make a few dollars on the rebuild.
Velo Mule is offline  
Old 03-02-20, 05:04 PM
  #9  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 2,510

Bikes: old school 531c & Campy

Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1068 Post(s)
Liked 742 Times in 457 Posts
Originally Posted by davester View Post
It's no harder than rebuilding a hub. You just need a cone wrench...
Sorta. I can get a cone wrench on some pedal cones, like Campy Record and KKT Pro Ace. But I cannot fit a regular cone wrench on my KKT Top Run pedals ... and many others. So I use trial and error and rely the toothed lock washer to lock the nut to the cone. If the washer tooth is busted, it must be replaced in order to continue.

I generally use a pedal wrench on the crank arm side of the pedal axle to keep it in place while tightening the lock nut against the washer/cone using a socket wrench.
SurferRosa is offline  
Old 03-02-20, 05:23 PM
  #10  
zukahn1 
Senior Member
 
zukahn1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Fairplay Co
Posts: 7,791

Bikes: Current 79 Nishiki Custum Sport, Jeunet 620, notable previous bikes P.K. Ripper loop tail, Kawahara Laser Lite, Paramount Track full chrome, Raliegh Internatioanl, Motobecan Super Mirage. 59 Crown royak 3 speed

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 402 Post(s)
Liked 117 Times in 91 Posts
I rebuild lube replace bearings on pedals if there nice pedals can rebuild them several times. You will need a couple of cone wrenches,, thin walled sockets the right size some good needle nose pliers a small screw driver, some good sticky grease an assortment of new small bearings (a lot of pedals take two different sizes for per pedal and hour or two of time and a lot pf patience. It often takes me longer to do a rebuild on a set of pedals than a set of wheels including basic true, tire take off and remount.
zukahn1 is offline  
Old 03-02-20, 05:42 PM
  #11  
retrodude
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Burnaby, British Columbia
Posts: 83

Bikes: 1984 & 1990 Marinoni Specials - 2008 Kona Dogma - 1976 Schwinn Suburban

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 65 Times in 23 Posts
I've rebuilt many pedals over the years when the bearing races are not worn out. Never used a cone wrench. Typically there is a washer with a tooth under the lock nut that prevents the cone from turning. Just strip em' down, degrease and reassemble with new grease. I use a flat blade screw driver to rotate the cone between testing the bearing play after lock nut tightening. If the axle feels tight, loosen the lock nut, rotate the cone with a blade screw driver and re-tighten the lock nut until bearing play is gone
retrodude is offline  
Likes For retrodude:
Old 03-02-20, 06:41 PM
  #12  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 14,523
Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1383 Post(s)
Liked 349 Times in 275 Posts
Sometimes you have to modify a tool-
a set of Lyotards I did just recently needed a home made dust cap wrench ( Campy was close but not) and a ground down socket to engage the cone with confidence.

donít overpack with grease- a ď25%Ē fill is plenty and tweezers to place the bearings

a vice or vice grip with protection can be your third hand.

some planning required, a clean dead flannel nightgown for laying out bits... Lanz of Salzburg are terrific...
repechage is offline  
Old 03-03-20, 12:44 AM
  #13  
polymorphself 
Senior Member
 
polymorphself's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Arizona
Posts: 697
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 256 Post(s)
Liked 163 Times in 91 Posts
I canít help but smile at the natural and reflexive responses here. Everyone is so eager to give advice and tutorials and even type out full explanations. Itís why this forum is so great, and even if the OP doesnít use the advice, weíve now got a thread full of instructions for anyone looking to rebuild their pedals.

That being said, we gotta suck it up sometimes and just admit that some people want it done the easy way, and there are many perfectly good reasons for that. Itís like pastor bob with his freewheel service. Itís just the right route for some and I think we have the resources here to cater to that as well.

Heres hoping someone steps up to the plate and makes a few bucks along the way!
polymorphself is offline  
Old 03-03-20, 09:04 AM
  #14  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 21,531

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2169 Post(s)
Liked 534 Times in 368 Posts
Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
.
...you can also use a 15mm crank bolt wrench to hold the cone, which leaves the locking nut exposed for your convenient access with almost any 10 mm socket.


For Campagnolo pedals at least, a 14mm peanut butter wrench like the Park CCW-14 or Park CCW 14-15-16mm wrench is a better fit.

It is also helpful to hold the pedal axle in an axle vise to secure things while you're working on the bearings.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 03-03-20, 01:02 PM
  #15  
Manny66 
Senior Member
 
Manny66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Whittier
Posts: 403

Bikes: 1977 Windsor Profesional,1979 Mondia Special, Pinarello Gavia TSX,Eddy Merckx Corsa Extra,Eddy Merckx EMX-5 , Guerciotti SL,Basso Gap, 1982 Moser SL,Concorde TSX,Concorde TVT, LOOK 486,Vitus 979 KAS.Diamant SLX,60's Meteor

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 111 Post(s)
Liked 108 Times in 68 Posts
A USPS Flat Rate box that would fit those pedals runs about $7.60 each way, still not a bad $ involved if you dont have the tools or grease or the patience do deal with tiny little metal balls.

BTW, I always lay down a towel on my work bench when dealing with bearings to keep them from running off the bench and into the "mystery hole" where some of my socks and keys are also hiding.
Manny66 is offline  
Likes For Manny66:
Old 03-04-20, 07:43 AM
  #16  
francophile 
PM me your cotters
 
francophile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: ATL
Posts: 2,986
Mentioned: 65 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 803 Post(s)
Liked 228 Times in 175 Posts
I get the sense you're looking for someone to rebuild for you, so this advice may be totally fruitless, I'm just sharing an experience you may find interesting.

You'd be amazed at what you can accomplish on pedals without a teardown and rebuild. If you remove the pedal cap, then spray in a light petroleum-based product like PB Blaster, which dissolves even the hardest and oldest of hardened grease, then spin freely for a couple of minutes to really work it around, then blow it all out or flush, you can manage a fairly significant cleaning. I keep a small crock pot on my shop table, remove all the plastic parts from the pedal, then run a pedal at a time overnight, the latent heat will evaporate any water after draining (or you can bake at 150-170įF for 20min). After drying and cooling, follow back up with a syringe of your preferred grease and work it around. I learned this trick (not sure if "trick" or "hack", but whatever) from one of the veterans at a shop I worked at decades ago as a late-teen.

Granted, this won't give you a chance to look at the races to see if they're in good shape. It won't replace worn bearings or races. It *will* flush out caked grease and grit, then replace with a good lube, and get your pedals spinning freely again - just doing the PB blaster spray will accomplish that, but it will also liquefy any grease inside and/or lower its viscosity. I've used it a number of times on pedals in the bin I use for my flip bikes and on our kids smaller BMX bikes.
__________________
███████████████

francophile is offline  
Old 03-05-20, 09:13 AM
  #17  
robertj298 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
robertj298's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 544

Bikes: 1985 Specialized Sequoia, 1986 Miyata 912, 1987 Centurion Ironman Expert, 1988 Miyata 615, 1989 Centurion Ironman Expert

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 348 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 106 Times in 57 Posts
I found someone local that will do them for $20 a pair. Seems fair to me
robertj298 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.