Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Tire lever for carbon wheels?

Notices
Road Cycling ďIt is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.Ē -- Ernest Hemingway

Tire lever for carbon wheels?

Old 09-30-19, 08:27 PM
  #1  
dvai
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 116
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Tire lever for carbon wheels?

I recently got a set of carbon wheels. I now wonder if I need special or specific tire levels or any other precaution when changing tires.
Im afraid I will damage the rim bead/bed or even the braking surface.

Thoughts?
dvai is offline  
Old 09-30-19, 08:49 PM
  #2  
drewtk
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 34
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Plastic levers will be fine. I’ve never had a problem using them on my carbon wheels. The best thing I ever learned was to reinstall the tire without having to use a lever. You simply squeeze the tire around the rim to place it into the center channel of the rim; push more of the remaining tire onto the rim; then keep repeating until the tire is fully installed. Takes a little patience but works for me every time.
drewtk is offline  
Likes For drewtk:
Old 10-01-19, 05:46 AM
  #3  
pickettt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 411

Bikes: DiamondBack Podium 7, Focus Raven 1.0, Ritchey BreakAway Cross, (2) Trek 8500, Paramount PDG 90, Trek T2000, Redline Flight Pro 24

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 160 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 32 Posts
Do your best to learn without using levers at all.
pickettt is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 06:32 AM
  #4  
WhyFi
Senior Member
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: TC, MN
Posts: 28,645

Bikes: R3 Disc, Haanjo

Mentioned: 335 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11973 Post(s)
Liked 1,756 Times in 948 Posts
The plain ol' plastic ones next to the register at every LBS work fine - I think mine are Pedro's, but it's not terribly important. Like others, I never use/never had to use them for mounting - just getting the first part of the bead over when removing.
WhyFi is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 06:52 AM
  #5  
eduskator
Senior Member
 
eduskator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Quťbec, Canada
Posts: 652

Bikes: TCR Advanced Pro 0 Disc

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 296 Post(s)
Liked 129 Times in 104 Posts
Plastic ones definitively, and thick enough to not break. Your CF wheels are able to withstand the pressure applied by the lever on a specific area.

I use the TACX.
eduskator is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 09:33 AM
  #6  
ThermionicScott 
7-speed cultist
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 20,020

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers)

Mentioned: 86 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2759 Post(s)
Liked 670 Times in 466 Posts
Originally Posted by drewtk View Post
Plastic levers will be fine. Iíve never had a problem using them on my carbon wheels. The best thing I ever learned was to reinstall the tire without having to use a lever. You simply squeeze the tire around the rim to place it into the center channel of the rim; push more of the remaining tire onto the rim; then keep repeating until the tire is fully installed. Takes a little patience but works for me every time.
Solid first post!
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 12:56 PM
  #7  
Rides4Beer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: SC
Posts: 965

Bikes: Defy | Revolt

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 505 Post(s)
Liked 392 Times in 217 Posts
Originally Posted by drewtk View Post
Plastic levers will be fine. Iíve never had a problem using them on my carbon wheels. The best thing I ever learned was to reinstall the tire without having to use a lever. You simply squeeze the tire around the rim to place it into the center channel of the rim; push more of the remaining tire onto the rim; then keep repeating until the tire is fully installed. Takes a little patience but works for me every time.
This. I've never had to use levers. For brand new tires, I lay them out in the sun for a while, def helps with the first mounting.
Rides4Beer is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 07:16 PM
  #8  
gurk700
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 256
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 151 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 5 Posts
I promise you don't need levers. Learn the right technique!
gurk700 is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 07:49 PM
  #9  
Marcus_Ti 
FLIR Kitten to 0.05C
 
Marcus_Ti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 5,078

Bikes: Roadie: Seven Axiom Race Ti w/Chorus 11s. CX/Adventure: Carver Gravel Grinder w/ Di2

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2199 Post(s)
Liked 208 Times in 137 Posts
Originally Posted by gurk700 View Post
I promise you don't need levers. Learn the right technique!
...depends on the tires and the rims.

You've read the hate-stories about GP5000?
Marcus_Ti is offline  
Likes For Marcus_Ti:
Old 10-01-19, 07:51 PM
  #10  
gurk700
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 256
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 151 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Marcus_Ti View Post
...depends on the tires and the rims.

You've read the hate-stories about GP5000?
Why use tires that are horribly designed? I have no doubt they ride amazing but there are a lot of tires that perform just as well, look as good, cost same or less
and FIT PERFECT.

gurk700 is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 07:58 PM
  #11  
datlas 
Beyond Bogus
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Posts: 31,584

Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 445 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11480 Post(s)
Liked 1,034 Times in 593 Posts
Originally Posted by gurk700 View Post
I promise you don't need levers. Learn the right technique!
To change a flat? Of course you need them. SMH
__________________
Originally Posted by rjones28 View Post
Addiction is all about class.
datlas is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 08:04 PM
  #12  
gurk700
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 256
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 151 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by datlas View Post
To change a flat? Of course you need them. SMH
Haven't carried or even owned tire levers for years. Had many flats. No issues here.
gurk700 is offline  
Old 10-02-19, 03:41 AM
  #13  
datlas 
Beyond Bogus
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Posts: 31,584

Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 445 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11480 Post(s)
Liked 1,034 Times in 593 Posts
Originally Posted by gurk700 View Post
Haven't carried or even owned tire levers for years. Had many flats. No issues here.
You have stronger fingers than me! Most of us still need levers to remove a tire. Avoid them to remount, of course.
__________________
Originally Posted by rjones28 View Post
Addiction is all about class.
datlas is offline  
Old 10-02-19, 05:10 AM
  #14  
Stormsedge
Senior Member
 
Stormsedge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: East Tennessee
Posts: 677

Bikes: 2017 Trek Domane SL6 Disc, 1990 Schwinn Crosscut Frankenroadbike, 2015 KHS Team 29 FS *NEW BIKE*, 2000 Gary Fisher Tassajara--gone but not forgotten

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 154 Post(s)
Liked 47 Times in 28 Posts
I use plastic when the tires are stubborn.
Stormsedge is offline  
Old 10-02-19, 05:25 AM
  #15  
mprince
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Mooresville, NC
Posts: 84

Bikes: Steelman Stage Race, Dura-Ace 9s

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 21 Posts
As already said, plastic levers will work fine if you find you need to use them.
mprince is offline  
Old 10-02-19, 05:56 AM
  #16  
Marcus_Ti 
FLIR Kitten to 0.05C
 
Marcus_Ti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 5,078

Bikes: Roadie: Seven Axiom Race Ti w/Chorus 11s. CX/Adventure: Carver Gravel Grinder w/ Di2

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2199 Post(s)
Liked 208 Times in 137 Posts
Originally Posted by gurk700 View Post
Why use tires that are horribly designed? I have no doubt they ride amazing but there are a lot of tires that perform just as well, look as good, cost same or less
and FIT PERFECT.

Fulcrum/Campag rims and Hutchinson tires are another entire lu-lu setup.

There are lots of setups out there that cannot be bare-handed...and I've seen over-confident wrenches get cocky over it at ride-SAGs....and then return someone's wheel an hour later, crestfallen, and with bruised hands from trying to barehand it in spite of cautions.
Marcus_Ti is offline  
Old 10-02-19, 10:02 AM
  #17  
popeye
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Newport Beach, CA
Posts: 1,531

Bikes: S works Tarmac, Felt TK2 track

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 169 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 16 Posts
Originally Posted by gurk700 View Post
Why use tires that are horribly designed? I have no doubt they ride amazing but there are a lot of tires that perform just as well, look as good, cost same or less
and FIT PERFECT.

Easy mounting is not even on my list for tires.
popeye is offline  
Old 10-02-19, 10:09 AM
  #18  
gurk700
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 256
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 151 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by popeye View Post
Easy mounting is not even on my list for tires.
Well good news for you as you can have easy mounting without sacrificing any detectable performance difference.
If you're one of those people who claim they can tell the grip difference and roll resistance between 2 top performing tires, I'm willing to bet you ride once per week to go to coffee shop and show off to your friends.

Otherwise, like I said, you don't have to sacrifice anything as it's 2019 and you have loads of good choices.

To the ones who have weaker fingers, fair enough.
gurk700 is offline  
Old 10-02-19, 11:10 AM
  #19  
eduskator
Senior Member
 
eduskator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Quťbec, Canada
Posts: 652

Bikes: TCR Advanced Pro 0 Disc

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 296 Post(s)
Liked 129 Times in 104 Posts
Originally Posted by datlas View Post
To change a flat? Of course you need them. SMH
Judging from other member's answers, it seems like one should be able to unmount one side of the tire only using its fingers.

Perhaps they're Iron Man or something, because I can tell you that my finger will break in half if I try to put it between my rim and my tire and use it to pry the sidewall out.
eduskator is offline  
Old 10-02-19, 12:59 PM
  #20  
datlas 
Beyond Bogus
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Posts: 31,584

Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 445 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11480 Post(s)
Liked 1,034 Times in 593 Posts
Originally Posted by eduskator View Post
Judging from other member's answers, it seems like one should be able to unmount one side of the tire only using its fingers.

Perhaps they're Iron Man or something, because I can tell you that my finger will break in half if I try to put it between my rim and my tire and use it to pry the sidewall out.
Agree. Although I suppose itís possible if you squeeze bead to middle channel of rim all around, that might buy you a few mm of play to unmount tire with fingers. I might try it sometime but SOP is to use tire lever when removing tire, and AVOID doing so when mounting. True confession, I have occasionally used the lever to remount when tire/rim combo stubborn.
__________________
Originally Posted by rjones28 View Post
Addiction is all about class.
datlas is offline  
Old 10-02-19, 01:35 PM
  #21  
ThermionicScott 
7-speed cultist
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 20,020

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers)

Mentioned: 86 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2759 Post(s)
Liked 670 Times in 466 Posts
Originally Posted by eduskator View Post
Judging from other member's answers, it seems like one should be able to unmount one side of the tire only using its fingers.

Perhaps they're Iron Man or something, because I can tell you that my finger will break in half if I try to put it between my rim and my tire and use it to pry the sidewall out.
Well, of course. No smart person would do that.

What works for me is to work both beads into the center channel, pinch the tire in one spot at the sidewalls, lift, and push the tire bead over the rim sidewall.

Prying is a non-starter because you make a tight fit worse by putting something else in between. Don't do it.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 10-02-19, 01:49 PM
  #22  
ridingfool
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 234
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 82 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by pickettt View Post
Do your best to learn without using levers at all.
How do u take the tire off without a tire lever never use them to put a tire on .But off is another matter always use one.
ridingfool is offline  
Old 10-02-19, 01:57 PM
  #23  
ridingfool
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 234
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 82 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
Well, of course. No smart person would do that.

What works for me is to work both beads into the center channel, pinch the tire in one spot at the sidewalls, lift, and push the tire bead over the rim sidewall.

Prying is a non-starter because you make a tight fit worse by putting something else in between. Don't do it.
Will try that on next removel seems like it will work thanks for the post
ridingfool is offline  
Old 10-02-19, 04:13 PM
  #24  
pickettt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 411

Bikes: DiamondBack Podium 7, Focus Raven 1.0, Ritchey BreakAway Cross, (2) Trek 8500, Paramount PDG 90, Trek T2000, Redline Flight Pro 24

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 160 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 32 Posts
Degrees from
Originally Posted by ridingfool View Post
How do u take the tire off without a tire lever never use them to put a tire on .But off is another matter always use one.
Using your thumbs, push the bead off the bead seat and into the center channel of the rim. Turn the rim around and do the same to the other side. During the remainder of this process, be sure to keep the bead in the center channel. The circumference of
the tire bead is larger than that of the center channel
of the rim, and the difference will be the room you have to work with. Beginning at the valve stem, pull the beads deep into the channel, so all of the excess space is on top. Imagine two concentric circles with uniform distance between them......then, pull the outside circle up until the two touch at the bottom . What youíll have is a much greater distance between them at 180 degrees from that contact point. This, in my experience, has been plenty of room to use the heel of your hand to roll the bead (one side or both, if you want to remove the tire entirely) over the edge of the rim. Remember: at all times during the process, check to maintain that the beads are seated in that center channel. To reinstall the tire, reverse the steps, being sure to start 180 degrees from the valve stem.
Iíve been riding, racing, and wrenching bikes for over 30 years and Iíve not used a tire lever in over the last 25 of those, even with road tubeless tires which have a shallower center channel. Itís faster, safer, and requires fewer tools to carry. Practice, follow the steps. Good luck.
pickettt is offline  
Old 10-02-19, 05:56 PM
  #25  
ridingfool
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 234
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 82 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by pickettt View Post
Degrees from
Using your thumbs, push the bead off the bead seat and into the center channel of the rim. Turn the rim around and do the same to the other side. During the remainder of this process, be sure to keep the bead in the center channel. The circumference of
the tire bead is larger than that of the center channel
of the rim, and the difference will be the room you have to work with. Beginning at the valve stem, pull the beads deep into the channel, so all of the excess space is on top. Imagine two concentric circles with uniform distance between them......then, pull the outside circle up until the two touch at the bottom . What youíll have is a much greater distance between them at 180 degrees from that contact point. This, in my experience, has been plenty of room to use the heel of your hand to roll the bead (one side or both, if you want to remove the tire entirely) over the edge of the rim. Remember: at all times during the process, check to maintain that the beads are seated in that center channel. To reinstall the tire, reverse the steps, being sure to start 180 degrees from the valve stem.
Iíve been riding, racing, and wrenching bikes for over 30 years and Iíve not used a tire lever in over the last 25 of those, even with road tubeless tires which have a shallower center channel. Itís faster, safer, and requires fewer tools to carry. Practice, follow the steps. Good luck.
Thanks for the detailed info. Will try on next flat or tire change been pretty lucky with flats tho well over 5000 miles between a few bikes without one thanks to conti gp4 a fan here for them just wish they lasted a little longer.
ridingfool is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.