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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Newbie looking for bike advice

Old 03-26-20, 09:53 AM
  #1  
Yonah
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Newbie looking for bike advice

So I am new to the forums, please be gentle

I currently ride a lotus bike that I bought on Ebay 15 years ago, and it's starting to show it's age. Rather than put money into a bike I bought used 15 years ago, I think it's time to buy a new one. For the most part, I primarily ride recreationally - most rides are small - say 5 miles or so.

I have had success buying bikes for my teenagers at Bikesdirect, and I think I'd like to buy one there, but given I have 0 knowledge about the differences in cranksets, brakes, and the like, I'm having a hard time deciding between 2-3 models on their site, specifically:

Motobecane Mirage S
Motobecane Mirage SL
Motobecane Turino

Aside from the Disc Road brakes on the Turino - I have no Idea on how to differentiate between these three, or if the $50 price bump between each is justified.
Is the Turino worth the extra $100 over the Mirage S?

Any and all advice is appreciated (Including if I've posted this in the wrong forum).
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Old 03-26-20, 01:11 PM
  #2  
HTupolev
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Originally Posted by Yonah View Post
I currently ride a lotus bike that I bought on Ebay 15 years ago, and it's starting to show it's age. Rather than put money into a bike I bought used 15 years ago, I think it's time to buy a new one.
What particular bike is it, and in what way is it "showing its age?"

I have had success buying bikes for my teenagers at Bikesdirect, and I think I'd like to buy one there, but given I have 0 knowledge about the differences in cranksets, brakes, and the like, I'm having a hard time deciding between 2-3 models on their site, specifically:

Motobecane Mirage S
Motobecane Mirage SL
Motobecane Turino

Aside from the Disc Road brakes on the Turino - I have no Idea on how to differentiate between these three, or if the $50 price bump between each is justified.
Is the Turino worth the extra $100 over the Mirage S?

Any and all advice is appreciated (Including if I've posted this in the wrong forum).
The main difference between the Mirage S and Mirage SL is the drivetrain spec. The S uses a 2x7 drivetrain, while the SL uses a slightly higher-tier 2x8 drivetrain. The SL's highest gear is slightly higher, and its lowest gear is about 1 gear step lower than on the S. Because of the wider gearing range, the gear steps on the SL's cassette are actually slightly wider than on the S, despite the extra cog. If your terrain is hilly and you're concerned with adequate low-end for climbing, you might err toward the SL.

The Turino Comp is a fairly different machine.
The price premium mostly comes from the disc brakes: its component tier is actually similar to the Mirage S, although it uses a 3x7 configuration instead of 2x7. The lowest gear is lower than on the Mirage S, but not quite as low as on the Mirage SL. Because the 50-39-30 chainrings are more closely spaced than the 50-34 doubles on the other bikes, front shifts will likely be a bit snappier assuming that everything is well-adjusted.
The Turino Comp is more of an endurance/gravel bike than the other two, with slacker steering and longer chainstays. Its handling will probably feel a little calmer at speed, and it can fit much larger tires if you ever want to set it up for riding rough or unpaved surfaces: BikesDirect says up to 45mm wide.
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Old 03-26-20, 02:11 PM
  #3  
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Originally Posted by Yonah View Post
I primarily ride recreationally - most rides are small - say 5 miles or so.
Anything.... Just make certain it's got gearing low enough for the terrain you'll be climbing.
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Old 03-26-20, 02:12 PM
  #4  
Yonah
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Thanks for responding!
Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
What particular bike is it, and in what way is it "showing its age?"
Honestly I have know idea of the particular model. I bought it used on ebay. I don't ride that often, but I've been riding a lot lately because of corona restrictions. Last couple of rides I noticed:
- Brakes probably need replacement pads/ cable tightening or replacement
- My gears keep slipping and cause my chain to fall off - again probably need tightening and/or replacement. (My shifters are the old school levers on the stem).

My guess is *I Could* go to an LBS and get a tune up, or try to order parts and tune it up myself. But given that this is approximately a 30-year old bike (at least) that I've got 15-years of use out of, I'm not sure I want to put at least another $100 or so into it, and maybe it's time to get a new bike after 15 years.

Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post

The main difference between the Mirage S and Mirage SL is the drivetrain spec. The S uses a 2x7 drivetrain, while the SL uses a slightly higher-tier 2x8 drivetrain. The SL's highest gear is slightly higher, and its lowest gear is about 1 gear step lower than on the S. Because of the wider gearing range, the gear steps on the SL's cassette are actually slightly wider than on the S, despite the extra cog. If your terrain is hilly and you're concerned with adequate low-end for climbing, you might err toward the SL.

The Turino Comp is a fairly different machine.
The price premium mostly comes from the disc brakes: its component tier is actually similar to the Mirage S, although it uses a 3x7 configuration instead of 2x7. The lowest gear is lower than on the Mirage S, but not quite as low as on the Mirage SL. Because the 50-39-30 chainrings are more closely spaced than the 50-34 doubles on the other bikes, front shifts will likely be a bit snappier assuming that everything is well-adjusted.
The Turino Comp is more of an endurance/gravel bike than the other two, with slacker steering and longer chainstays. Its handling will probably feel a little calmer at speed, and it can fit much larger tires if you ever want to set it up for riding rough or unpaved surfaces: BikesDirect says up to 45mm wide.
Thanks for the detailed info, I really appreciate it, it was really helpful. It shows I've got a lot to learn about biking.
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Old 03-26-20, 04:53 PM
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I cant access bikes direct from where I am. So I can't see the models you are talking about.

I would buy a mountain bike with disc brakes and front suspension. Disc brakes are much better than rim brakes.

I don't know how tall you are. If you are not tall, you may get 26 inch wheels. If you are tall, get 29 inch wheels.
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Old 03-26-20, 05:39 PM
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Yonah
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Originally Posted by alo View Post
I cant access bikes direct from where I am. So I can't see the models you are talking about.

I would buy a mountain bike with disc brakes and front suspension. Disc brakes are much better than rim brakes.

I don't know how tall you are. If you are not tall, you may get 26 inch wheels. If you are tall, get 29 inch wheels.
I am specifically asking for a road bike, so most likely wheel diameter is going to be 700
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Old 03-26-20, 07:06 PM
  #7  
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The three bikes you mentioned ---and a lot of other BikesDirect models---are probably your best bet. You are their perfect customer---you need a quality bike which will be reliable and durable and lots of fun to ride, but you don't need to be the fastest with the latest who spent the most.

The only things I can say: first, you had better resign yourself to spending money at a bike shop.

A BD bike needs some assembly and adjustment, and after a few weeks (depending on how much you ride) will need a tune-up. You need to either go to Park Tools and/or YouTube and watch some videos on adjusting brakes and derailleurs, and other minor maintenance stuff, or you need to go to the local shop.

Typically, you can expect the BD bike to need cable adjustments and wheel maintenance after a few hundred miles. They also need to be set up out of the box---they Might shift and stop some, but probably not well. So right there you have two trips to the LBS (local bike shop) unless you learn to do your own work.

Second---while I have heard that BD will accept returns, it isn't always easy and even if you return the bike and get a replacement or cash back, you are looking at paying serious shipping fees, plus the joy of hauling the bike to the post office. So ... you had better be really sure on the sizing.

If your Lotus is comfortable, then get out your tape measure. Look at the geometry charts on the BD site, then make the same measurements on your Lotus, and see what size frame hits closest to the bike you like. Remember, you can get stems in different lengths and angles, shorter or deeper handlebars, and you can move your saddle up and down and back and forth some. You can take spacers out from under the stem (if there are any) but you cannot always add spacers---it depends on how short the steerer tube was cut.

Competitive Cyclist has a fit calculator, (https://www.competitivecyclist.com/S...ulatorBike.jsp) which works for some folks and not for others. Between the BD geometry charts, the calculator and your measurements from the Lotus, you should be able to decide which size you need.
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Old 03-27-20, 06:19 AM
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Yonah
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
The three bikes you mentioned ---and a lot of other BikesDirect models---are probably your best bet. You are their perfect customer---you need a quality bike which will be reliable and durable and lots of fun to ride, but you don't need to be the fastest with the latest who spent the most.

The only things I can say: first, you had better resign yourself to spending money at a bike shop.

A BD bike needs some assembly and adjustment, and after a few weeks (depending on how much you ride) will need a tune-up. You need to either go to Park Tools and/or YouTube and watch some videos on adjusting brakes and derailleurs, and other minor maintenance stuff, or you need to go to the local shop.

Typically, you can expect the BD bike to need cable adjustments and wheel maintenance after a few hundred miles. They also need to be set up out of the box---they Might shift and stop some, but probably not well. So right there you have two trips to the LBS (local bike shop) unless you learn to do your own work.

Second---while I have heard that BD will accept returns, it isn't always easy and even if you return the bike and get a replacement or cash back, you are looking at paying serious shipping fees, plus the joy of hauling the bike to the post office. So ... you had better be really sure on the sizing.

If your Lotus is comfortable, then get out your tape measure. Look at the geometry charts on the BD site, then make the same measurements on your Lotus, and see what size frame hits closest to the bike you like. Remember, you can get stems in different lengths and angles, shorter or deeper handlebars, and you can move your saddle up and down and back and forth some. You can take spacers out from under the stem (if there are any) but you cannot always add spacers---it depends on how short the steerer tube was cut.

Competitive Cyclist has a fit calculator,which works for some folks and not for others. Between the BD geometry charts, the calculator and your measurements from the Lotus, you should be able to decide which size you need.
Thanks for the suggestions and advice. To clarify, I don't mind going to my LBS for a seasonal tune up and/or repairs. I do mind going with a bike that I've had for 15+ years.
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