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Huffy Men's Parkview 27.5 SE 2020 Specs

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Huffy Men's Parkview 27.5 SE 2020 Specs

Old 12-20-20, 05:42 PM
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BlindGuyRides
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Huffy Men's Parkview 27.5 SE 2020 Specs

Since there is nothing in the google machine I am making this thread to try documenting specifications that are, infuriatingly, not listed. More problematic for me is several of the components appear unbranded, so I do not know if they fall within conventional standards or not. I appreciate any help in narrowing specs down or how to make better measurements. I also make this with the understanding that I will need to revise as mistakes in measure or where to find model numbers will/have been/will be made.

As a note: I am listing this in general because I do not consider this a 'mountain' bike, even if I feel the frame geometry more closely matches a mountain bike than beach cruiser, because even the walmart hanger tags that are known for overpromising, list this as 'light trail and urban.' I honestly have no idea what category to put this in on this forum and would appreciate any mod feedback.

Product Page on Huffy's own Website:
https://www.huffybikes.com/parkside-...-5-inch-56728/

Front Chainring: 42 tooth unbranded, has removeable bolts connecting it to the crankset. (do I need to make measurements of the bolt distance from the center of crankset?)
Note: Five bolt connection to crankset.
Chain Guard is welded to the main body of the frame near the rear of the bike.

Crankset: Unbranded, Metal crank arms.
Plastic solid face pedals.

Rear seven speed 14 - 28 tooth freewheel.
Shemano Derailleur: RD-TZ31-A

Shifter: Seven Speed Revo twist shifter: SL-RS35-6R

Wheels: Unbranded 27.5 road tires (sidewall pressures listed at 44 - 56 PSI)
Valve Type: Schrader

Seat: Unbranded 'comfort' style spring seat.
Handlebar Mount type: Quill Stem
Handlebar Width end to end: 2 feet 5 inches (approximate) converts to approximately 762 millimeters
Handgrips: Unbranded rubber.

Last edited by BlindGuyRides; 12-20-20 at 09:10 PM.
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Old 12-20-20, 05:55 PM
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Originally Posted by BlindGuyRides View Post
Since there is nothing in the google machine I am making this thread to try documenting specifications that are, infuriatingly, not listed. More problematic for me is several of the components appear unbranded, so I do not know if they fall within conventional standards or not. I appreciate any help in narrowing specs down or how to make better measurements. I also make this with the understanding that I will need to revise.

As a note: I am listing this in general because I do not consider this a 'mountain' bike, even if I feel the frame geometry more closely matches a mountain bike than beach cruiser, because even the walmart hanger tags that are known for overpromising, list this as 'light trail and urban.' I honestly have no idea what category to put this in on this forum and would appreciate any mod feedback.

Product Page on Huffy's own Website:
https://www.huffybikes.com/parkside-...-5-inch-56728/

Front Chainring: 44 (possibly 42) tooth, has removeable bolts connecting it to the crankset. (do I need to make measurements of the bolt distance from the center of crankset?)
Chain Guard is welded to the main body of the frame near the rear of the bike.

Crankset: Unbranded, Metal crank arms.
Plastic solid face pedals.

Rear seven speed 14 - 28 tooth freewheel.
Shemano Derailleur: RD-TZ31-A

Shifter: Seven Speed Revo twist shifter: SL-RS35-6R

Wheels: Unbranded 27.5 road tires (sidewall pressures listed at 44 - 56 PSI)

Seat: Unbranded 'comfort' style spring seat.
Handlebar Mount type: Quill Stem
Handlebar Width end to end: 2 feet 5 inches (approximate) converts to approximately 762 millimeters
Handgrips: Unbranded rubber.
Whenever we offer advice you get mad at us and your thread gets shut down. Things will not change. You want an expert opinion, take it, if you don't then do whatever you want. Maybe you have a history of other issues and I am sorry about that. I know it can be tough to deal with that but I can assure you nobody is being nasty towards you. We are just trying to be clear and honest about the bike you have. You can still ride it and should ride it but like we have all said several times over it would not be well worth it to upgrade this bike just tune it up and save that money. Trust me money saved is a good thing especially if you are like me and not so good with money. Use this bike as a learning experience to figure out what you like and don't like and that can inform your next purchase.

You will note I haven't really changed what I have said because I know a lot of folks with mental issues and have them myself from time to time (lost my mother in my early teens and have some shellshock/PTSD from that and some other incidents in my life beyond that) so rather than be nasty I am trying to put my hand out to virtually shake it since there is no way in hell I would shake in real life these days with COVID.
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Old 12-20-20, 06:19 PM
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Let’s provide BlindGuyRides answers and help. If you don’t have anything positive to respond with, just skip the post.
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Old 12-20-20, 09:09 PM
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Originally Posted by StanSeven View Post
Let’s provide BlindGuyRides answers and help. If you don’t have anything positive to respond with, just skip the post.

Well given I am making this thread because someone from this forum, forget who, made the wise suggestion that since no adequate documentation exists. Make it myself and post in a consice location for the google machine to index so others down the road have that knowledge.

Sure it's a big box bike, but that does not excuse the lack of coherent, much less useful, documentation for those that want to service this bike.

Will have to go through tomorrow, assuming time and no untoward surprises, and get a look at what allen sizes, wrench sizes, and so forth are needed for these parts.
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Old 12-20-20, 10:37 PM
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I'd take a closer look at that crankset, I'm guessing it look bolted on and is really riveted into place, seen that plenty of times. Knowing the part numbers for most of the things is completely useless. Important information, you'll need to measure
Axle width, probably 135mm based on the wheel type for the rear, 100mm for the front, will matter if you need to replace the wheel. Obviously as its in the description, a 27.5/650b sized wheel.
BB spindle, you'd have to pull the crank and measure, there are so many possibilities it isn't worth guessing.
BB type, probably a BSA
Stem dimensions, 1" or 1 1/8", pull the stem and by the insertion limit line it will say 25.4 or 31.8, same with the clamp diameter which is probably 26.0 but you'll have to unbolt and slide the bar out to read the measurement.
Seatpost diameter, pull it and read down by the minimum insertion line.

These are the critical measurements if you're going to try making changes. With the crank knowing the chainring could tell you what size ring you want with a new crank but things like new cranks will also potentially require a different BB.
Its shimano shifting so anything that works with that at the 7 or 8 speed level will work perfectly fine.
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Old 12-21-20, 04:10 AM
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Originally Posted by BlindGuyRides View Post
Will have to go through tomorrow, assuming time and no untoward surprises, and get a look at what allen sizes, wrench sizes, and so forth are needed for these parts.
I think the vast majority of 2020 cheap bikes will be served by metric toolsets.

A bike will typicaly require couple allen sizes (6mm maximum I think) and 10 to 15 mm for open wrenches so not a bad thing to get a whole set.

I actually bought an automotive toolset when I used to have my own car and now I'm using the set for the bike. The toolset had metric and english allen keys, open+box wrenches, socket wrenches with ratcheting handle, screwdriver sets, pliers, wire cutter, etc. The ratcheting wrench makes things very easy whenever you can use them as it makes removal of bolts quick.

The rest of the special tools, I bought individually from LBS. I brought my bike to the LBS and asked them what special tool needed for the part. If I can't bring the bike for any reason, I'll take pictures of the part and show it to the LBS staff so they can sell me the right tool but it would be better to bring the bike with you if you can.

Last edited by cubewheels; 12-21-20 at 04:18 AM.
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Old 12-21-20, 07:44 AM
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Harbor Freight sells several different metric hex wrench sets which are, for the cost, decent. They also sell under the Pittsburgh label sets of metric combination wrenches, adjustable wrenches and pliers, which again for the cost are fine. For screwdrivers get Craftsmen brand sets at Lowes. You will want a chain tool and a set of spoke wrenches, amazon is a s good a place as any for this purchase. A good floor pump with pressure gage is about $40 I think the Topeak Joe Blow costs about that much. A really good idea is to purchase off Amazon a generic repair manual. I personally like the ones by Leonard Zinn (Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance) but there are others. A bike stand is very useful for doing repairs. The costs of these stands is all over the map. You might be able to make something that will work for now. It is not very difficult to spend 2 or $300 on even a basic set of tools.
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Old 12-21-20, 08:19 AM
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Quill stem, so probably one-inch headset. 27.5 rims, almost certainly 135 spacing.

Might have to explain what "spindle length" is, (the length of the shaft connecting the two pedals)and that "135 spacing " means it is 135 mm between the rear dropouts (actually from the outsides of the axle nuts but that is harder to measure. Seat post likely 26.2 mm diameter, bar diameter looks 25 mm but impossible to tell from a picture---it might b good to know that 31.8 is standard.

BSA, I was surprised to learn, is not "British Standard" something but Birmingham Small Arms, properly called B.S.C. or British Standard Cycle. (https://bikerumor.com/2017/02/10/ask...ottom-bracket/) This is "a 68 or 73mm shell with 1.370/1.375″ x 24 TPI threads and a left hand thread on the drive side cup."

Raleigh had a proprietary version for a few years, Italian thread backward I think and French, Who knows? ( ) but people who want can google them. Almost every threaded BB out there is BSA.

Can't see from the photo, but maybe the bike pictured has dust caps over a square-taper spindle. A crank-puller and BB puller is usually recommended for removing those parts undamaged, but as with most things, judicious use of common tools might work 9or ruin the parts.)
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Old 12-21-20, 08:46 AM
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Huffy probably puts out 100+ models every year, and specs change at random base on what they can get cheapest. Plus, people who buy department store bikes care most about price and color. Huffy doesn't post detailed specs because their customers don't care. If you're trying to understand your bike better, fine; otherwise if you really want to document all of Huffy's specs, maybe you can host your own web page.

Last edited by BillyD; 12-21-20 at 10:50 AM.
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Old 12-21-20, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by BlazingPedals View Post
Huffy probably puts out 100+ models every year, and specs change at random base on what they can get cheapest.
This is a large part of it. If Huffy (or whichever mega-corporation owns them) bought 100,000 unbadged Tourney rear derailleurs, but decided to produce 150,000 bikes which need a rear derailleur, they might buy no-name, or whatever .... whatever was cheapest at the time. Maybe branded Tourney, maybe unbranded Tourney, maybe the last-generation model or the new one .... Same with any other parts. They'd have to list six or 11 build sheets per bike.

Originally Posted by BlazingPedals View Post
Plus, people who buy department store bikes care most about price and color. Huffy doesn't post detailed specs because their customers don't care. .
Also mostly true. Sure, it is a generalization, but generally people buying big-box bikes want "Product: Bicycle: Generic." Gear ratios? BB standards? Inner rim width? It has two wheels .... it is a standard bicycle. What?

Sort of why Ripple doesn't list the vineyards where the grapes were grown.
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Old 12-21-20, 09:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
This is a large part of it. If Huffy (or whichever mega-corporation owns them) bought 100,000 unbadged Tourney rear derailleurs, but decided to produce 150,000 bikes which need a rear derailleur, they might buy no-name, or whatever .... whatever was cheapest at the time. Maybe branded Tourney, maybe unbranded Tourney, maybe the last-generation model or the new one .... Same with any other parts. They'd have to list six or 11 build sheets per bike.
And complicating things, is the ease and frequency with which the manufacturers can swap model names amongst various different bikes. That Huffy might be sold all over the world in several different names, and vice-versa. This year's Huffy might have been some other brand last year. The KevCentral Youtube channel has a lot of good comments about bikes within this price range and I think he must be buying about 50 bikes a year just to review.
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Old 12-21-20, 10:06 AM
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sometimes the pace of a YouTube tutorial makes it difficult to keep up, so a printed version might be helpful. save a few bucks by picking up a basic bicycle repair book or two from your local library. (I guess some libraries are not operating at full capacity right now, but mine does curbside pickup for items put on hold.)

In case you ever need to remove it, the crankset likely has a 14mm bolt under those plastic caps. just pry the caps off and use a 14mm socket to remove the bolts. removing the arms, however, requires a special tool for removing square taper crank arms. I have an off-brand (not Park) one that was only $10 when I got it a year or two ago.
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Old 12-21-20, 10:11 AM
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no way to tell from here is that's a 1" threaded or 1-1/8" threaded stem/ headset/ fork setup, but Sheldon Brown has an easy way to check:
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Old 12-21-20, 10:14 AM
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the best and easiest upgrade you'll find for that bike are the brakes. as a former bike shop mechanic, I cringe every time I see those stamped steel brake arms with the cutout. no matter what you do, you can't make the springs stay in adjustment for very long. I see Shimano BR-T4000 brakes available online for less than $15 a brake. you'll need two of those.
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Old 12-21-20, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
I think the vast majority of 2020 cheap bikes will be served by metric toolsets.

A bike will typicaly require couple allen sizes (6mm maximum I think) and 10 to 15 mm for open wrenches so not a bad thing to get a whole set.

I actually bought an automotive toolset when I used to have my own car and now I'm using the set for the bike. The toolset had metric and english allen keys, open+box wrenches, socket wrenches with ratcheting handle, screwdriver sets, pliers, wire cutter, etc. The ratcheting wrench makes things very easy whenever you can use them as it makes removal of bolts quick.

The rest of the special tools, I bought individually from LBS. I brought my bike to the LBS and asked them what special tool needed for the part. If I can't bring the bike for any reason, I'll take pictures of the part and show it to the LBS staff so they can sell me the right tool but it would be better to bring the bike with you if you can.
Actually have access to a bunch of metric sockets and allan wrenches. I'm pretty well just documenting what the bike comes with. Unfortunately the day is pretty hectic. Will update initial post.
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Old 12-21-20, 11:42 AM
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First, all fasteners on modern bikes (even retro-styled cruisers) are metric. 15mm axle nuts, 15mm pedal wrench flats, 6mm allen head stem bolt, 5 or 6mm allen head brake pad nuts, probably a 9mm nut for the derailleur pinch bolt.

A shimano 7 speed derailleur indicates that the shifters and derailleurs and freewheel are SHimano compatible. Modern Shimano components are made for 11 or 12 speeds instead of 7, but there has also been a lot of cross-compatibility, even if Shimano doesn't admit it. Generally, any derailleur labelled for 7, 8, or 9 speed will work with 7 speed shifters, freewheels/cassettes and chains.

The direct-pull 'V' brakes indicate that any modern brake components for 'mountain bike' (long pull levers) cable actuated brakes will work.

I'd be real surprised if the chainring is replaceable. Even if it was, most modern components have gone to a 4-arm spider/chainring setup. I have seen a lot of cranks with the chainring riveted on, but the rivets are made to look like allen head bolts and are not removable. If I am wrong and it is removeable, you can measure the distance from the centre of one bolt to the centre of an adjacent bolt and use the table in this https://www.sheldonbrown.com/cribsheet-bcd.html link to figure out your BCD (bolt circle diameter). NB. Even if it appears to have the same BCD as a ring you find for sale, this does not necessarily mean the ring will fit without modification.

The stem is a quill-type, which goes inside the steerer tube of the fork and fastens with some sort of expander. Most (all?) modern non-dept-store bikes come with a threadless headset with a stem that clamps on the outside of the steerer tube of the fork. IF you want to change the stem to change or improve the fit of the bike, you can get a quill adaptor, which is basically a quill with a top part onto which a stem can be clamped. You can still get quill stems but generally not in the same variety of lengths and rises as modern threadless stems.
THe part of your handlebar that is clamped in the stem is likely 25.4mm in diameter, which is the older standard, but is still easy to find replacements.

I'm going to guess that your bike has a threaded bottom bracket shell with English threads. You can measure the width of the shell (the part of the frame through which the bottom bracket spindle passes). IT will either be 68mm wide or 73mm wide. Knowing which of these is correct, and the length of the spindle, are the two items you need to know to select the correct replacement.

I cannot guess what your seatpost diameter is, but you can almost definitely find something a little better when/if the separate clamp on the stock one fails. The diameter of the post will be stamped on the post down near the 'maximum extension' line. It's likely 25.4 or 26.2 mm or so. Replacements MUST match this number.
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Old 12-21-20, 09:29 PM
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
I think the vast majority of 2020 cheap bikes will be served by metric toolsets.

A bike will typicaly require couple allen sizes (6mm maximum I think) and 10 to 15 mm for open wrenches so not a bad thing to get a whole set.

I actually bought an automotive toolset when I used to have my own car and now I'm using the set for the bike. The toolset had metric and english allen keys, open+box wrenches, socket wrenches with ratcheting handle, screwdriver sets, pliers, wire cutter, etc. The ratcheting wrench makes things very easy whenever you can use them as it makes removal of bolts quick.

The rest of the special tools, I bought individually from LBS. I brought my bike to the LBS and asked them what special tool needed for the part. If I can't bring the bike for any reason, I'll take pictures of the part and show it to the LBS staff so they can sell me the right tool but it would be better to bring the bike with you if you can.
Pretty much every walmart bike, Mine, my brother's trash bike, the kid we babysit, etc... All use metric sockets and allan.

This is not me going 'ok what is my bike compatible with.' This is me going 'OK these are not listed ANYWHERE and it is ultra frustrating when trying to figure out if I have the right equipment or not.

By the way, t othe poster wh ocautioned the chainring may only look bolted on? Sadly you are correct. Rounded rivets on the insideedge. I'd have to drill those thigns out if I wanted to try doing anything, and as mentioned and backed by my own poking about, replacement chainrings are more oftne than not four bolt.

Today has been a bust on getting anything done because family emergancy has cropped up. I just wanted to pop my head in to provide clarification, and thanks for those chiming in with advice on narrowing down needed equipment and where to check for any measurement markigns. Am HIGHLY annoyed there is no etched or stamped 'oh hey this is how many teeth this chainring has' or 'this is the relevant measurments of the bottom bracket,' etc etc.
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Old 12-21-20, 09:53 PM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by BlindGuyRides View Post
I'd have to drill those thigns out if I wanted to try doing anything, and as mentioned and backed by my own poking about, replacement chainrings are more oftne than not four bolt.
Don't worry about the stock chainring for now. Cheap steel riveted chainrings are suprisingly tightly built and hard wearing. They actually last longer than far more expensive alloy chainrings if you keep them rust-free.
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Old 12-22-20, 03:52 AM
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Just ride the bike if/when the brakes won't stay adjusted get some now ones and better pads same with grips, and tires but be careful with the tires they can be expensive.

If it turns out you like riding bikes my focus would be on getting tools not parts for your bike, bottom bracket tools, cassette/freewheel tool, cone wrenches, chain tool, cable cutter. In a couple years you will have enough tools and probably money to find a better canvas and perhaps the skills and knowledge to build from a frame.
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Old 12-22-20, 01:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Germany_chris View Post
Just ride the bike if/when the brakes won't stay adjusted get some now ones and better pads same with grips, and tires but be careful with the tires they can be expensive.

If it turns out you like riding bikes my focus would be on getting tools not parts for your bike, bottom bracket tools, cassette/freewheel tool, cone wrenches, chain tool, cable cutter. In a couple years you will have enough tools and probably money to find a better canvas and perhaps the skills and knowledge to build from a frame.

That is the current plan. Just documenting so anyone else can follow.
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Old 12-22-20, 01:36 PM
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Originally Posted by BlindGuyRides View Post
Today has been a bust on getting anything done because family emergancy has cropped up. I just wanted to pop my head in to provide clarification, and thanks for those chiming in with advice on narrowing down needed equipment and where to check for any measurement markigns. Am HIGHLY annoyed there is no etched or stamped 'oh hey this is how many teeth this chainring has' or 'this is the relevant measurments of the bottom bracket,' etc etc.
I'd just keep the chainring you already have, unless it is worn or something.

Years ago, I wore one out and every time I tried to pedal hard the chain would jump ahead a tooth. It was OK if I was just pedalling gingerly but on a hill or something or hurrying to cross a busy street it was a real momentum-killer.

Best wishes to the family. Hope the emergency is only a minor one!
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Old 12-22-20, 01:46 PM
  #22  
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There’s a place to “document”:

https://www.bikeforums.net/blogger-s-forum/
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Old 12-22-20, 03:22 PM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by BlindGuyRides View Post
Sure it's a big box bike, but that does not excuse the lack of coherent, much less useful, documentation for those that want to service this bike.

Will have to go through tomorrow, assuming time and no untoward surprises, and get a look at what allen sizes, wrench sizes, and so forth are needed for these parts.
There is lots and lots of information on servicing bikes. Untold numbers of books have been written on the subject. Frankly, on a bike like your Huffy, any book that's been written in the last 40 years would be just fine. It's all the same things. Ironically, 'department store' bikes really haven't changed (component wise) much in a few decades, and all those generic parts like threaded headsets, square-taper BBs and quill stems are just that, GENERIC, ie: they're all the same. My experience is that components are even more standardized on inexpensive bikes, you don't see the kind of integration and purpose-built specialization that you get on a top-flight bike.

As far as tools go, like others have said before, a good set of metric hex keys, (particularly 4, 5, 6 and 8mm) and metric open end wrenches (8, 9, and 10mm ) and a set of sockets (8-15mm) Get them as a set, it'll cost a lot less than trying to source them one at a time, and in case you need a size that isn't specifically spelled out.
'Cone' wrenches are nice to have if you're getting into wheel hub bearing adjustment, but you can also get away with a regular 13-15mm wrench, if the jaws are thin enough.
Things like freewheel drivers, crank pullers, and bottom-bracket removal tools are one of those things that you'll use maybe once or twice in the life of the bike, and unless you're constantly tearing bikes apart, or doing frame-up builds, are really not needed for the beginning mechanic.

We can't tell you what size the cable retaining nut on your front left brake arm is, and frankly, we shouldn't have to. There is a lot of general guidance we can give you, but there's a lot of common sense involved in mechanic-ing, and that's a hard thing to teach over the internet.

I'm also not sure why you feel the need to tear a brand new bike apart, before you've even ridden it. Assessment is a big part of troubleshooting, and you seem to be going in with the mindset that 'My Bike is a POS and everything is wrong with it" before, it seems like you've even turned a wheel.
I've said this before, you have a very simple bike, and you won't be making any real demands of it (at least at first) so check it over and see if there's anything actually wrong before you start tearing into it.
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Old 12-22-20, 04:22 PM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by Ironfish653 View Post
There is lots and lots of information on servicing bikes. Untold numbers of books have been written on the subject. Frankly, on a bike like your Huffy, any book that's been written in the last 40 years would be just fine. It's all the same things. Ironically, 'department store' bikes really haven't changed (component wise) much in a few decades, and all those generic parts like threaded headsets, square-taper BBs and quill stems are just that, GENERIC, ie: they're all the same. My experience is that components are even more standardized on inexpensive bikes, you don't see the kind of integration and purpose-built specialization that you get on a top-flight bike.

As far as tools go, like others have said before, a good set of metric hex keys, (particularly 4, 5, 6 and 8mm) and metric open end wrenches (8, 9, and 10mm ) and a set of sockets (8-15mm) Get them as a set, it'll cost a lot less than trying to source them one at a time, and in case you need a size that isn't specifically spelled out.
'Cone' wrenches are nice to have if you're getting into wheel hub bearing adjustment, but you can also get away with a regular 13-15mm wrench, if the jaws are thin enough.
Things like freewheel drivers, crank pullers, and bottom-bracket removal tools are one of those things that you'll use maybe once or twice in the life of the bike, and unless you're constantly tearing bikes apart, or doing frame-up builds, are really not needed for the beginning mechanic.

We can't tell you what size the cable retaining nut on your front left brake arm is, and frankly, we shouldn't have to. There is a lot of general guidance we can give you, but there's a lot of common sense involved in mechanic-ing, and that's a hard thing to teach over the internet.

I'm also not sure why you feel the need to tear a brand new bike apart, before you've even ridden it. Assessment is a big part of troubleshooting, and you seem to be going in with the mindset that 'My Bike is a POS and everything is wrong with it" before, it seems like you've even turned a wheel.
I've said this before, you have a very simple bike, and you won't be making any real demands of it (at least at first) so check it over and see if there's anything actually wrong before you start tearing into it.

Your post has a lot of good insightful information, and so far everything conforms to that general 15 mm assumption (though given a 16 'sorta' worked I suspect a very loose tolernace or not all that regerous adhearance to spec was followed.

As for 'why tear down a perfectly good bike that isn't worth upgrading.' This is me getting familiar with hte motions. Seeing how thing connects to thing when everything is in good cherry condition. Reassemble so I know how to do so if something breaks and I need to put a new one on.

Am kinda annoyed at the common to need tightening parts all take bog standard wrenches and drivers where the 'barring poor luck should only ever have to take tjese parts off once or twice in a bike's life' parts have special custom tools I may never actually need, but feel uncomfortable not having.

Plus in the end everyone rags on walmart bike quality and assembly (shockingly everything was on correctly. Headtube on right side out, brakes following the curve of the rem and reasonably tight, etc with the only oddball being that initial tire pressure being horrifyingly low, but that could just be a sign of how long it was waiting.)

Finally there is the fact I don't have easy access to a local bike shop, so I damned well better learn how everything is SUPPOSED to connect in case i have to fix the thing (I may get family help, or it may be a non priority for a month. So to me there is no sense in NOT knowing.)

Edit: And I don't clock miles. Given my health, riding fields, etc it is an embarrassingly small number when put up against 'bruh i got fifty miles in today! yeeeaa!' However I have put about eight hours in seat.
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Old 12-22-20, 05:16 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by BlindGuyRides View Post

Plus in the end everyone rags on walmart bike quality and assembly (shockingly everything was on correctly. Headtube on right side out, brakes following the curve of the rem and reasonably tight, etc with the only oddball being that initial tire pressure being horrifyingly low, but that could just be a sign of how long it was waiting.)

Edit: And I don't clock miles. Given my health, riding fields, etc it is an embarrassingly small number when put up against 'bruh i got fifty miles in today! yeeeaa!' However I have put about eight hours in seat.
The final assembly done by the store can be completely hit-or-miss, but they never bother to take off wheels that are already installed, open up bearings, pull and grease cables, etc... they bot on the parts that com in the box not attached to the bike and nothing else. To be fair, bike shops don't do these things either, unless something is wrong or the customer complains.

THe real problem is the factory assembly where the bottom bracket is threaded into the frame, the hubs are assembled and adjusted, the wheels are built. A bike like yours, a fully rigid cruiser bike, should be reasonable, but I suspect the terrible full suspension bikes from box stores are atrocious because of the extra complexity and steps required to assemble one. Even if, for instance, the Schwinn assembly facility in China (or Malaysia or wherever) does a poor job, there are only so many things that can go wrong on your bike. More complicated inexpensive bikes with a season of use can be heard clanking and squeaking and grinding from a mile away.
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