Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Advice on flipping bikes

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Advice on flipping bikes

Old 01-18-21, 08:23 AM
  #1  
Stormy Archer
7 speed freedom wheel
Thread Starter
 
Stormy Archer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 197
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 91 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Advice on flipping bikes

A few questions I have for the seasoned flippers.

Mainly, I'm looking at cheap older steel frame builds.

Do people tend to go for riser bar bikes a lot more than drop bars? Do people care if their road bikes have big tires or not? I certainly care, but no clue what the average guy thinks.

What are the types of things you think people care most about? Indexed shifting a big one? Is it a bad idea to try and sell an 80s steel road frame with a mish mash of slightly more modern parts, simply because it might look "bad" or have less character?

A while back I sold a beautiful purple bridgestone 400 for 200$ within days of listing it. I didn't think it was special other than the looks. I guess looks are something to pay more attention to... hence my ragged 531c Dawes that I got for 80$
Stormy Archer is offline  
Old 01-18-21, 08:39 AM
  #2  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 6,305

Bikes: '71 Jeunet 640, '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1167 Post(s)
Liked 930 Times in 508 Posts
You don't give your location, so we cannot know your local market for used bicycles.

Aesthetics really matter. For maximum sale price, the bike should be immaculately clean, properly adjusted, with new/newer consumables, and nothing mismatching. Proportionate adjustments so that the bike doesn't appear awkwardly set up. Stage and shoot excellent photos, clear and crisp, showing the details of the frame, decals, drivetrain, brakes, stem/bars/headbadge and saddle. I try to get as close to catalog quality as possible.

As to the other things, I think that there's a buyer for every bike. I try to concentrate on mid-level or upper mid road bikes. I live in a very strong bike market where buyers don't hesitate to pay full market value or above.

Do your math before you buy a project bike. Know your market. Will there be any meat left on the bone after you've replaced what's worn? If so, then go for it. If not, pass.
Phil_gretz is offline  
Likes For Phil_gretz:
Old 01-18-21, 09:07 AM
  #3  
HerrKaLeun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,881

Bikes: Giant Toughroad SLR1 and Motobecane Sturgis NX

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 883 Post(s)
Liked 205 Times in 154 Posts
You probably depend more on what used bikes you can buy from auction etc. As long as it is not offending, it will sell.
HerrKaLeun is offline  
Old 01-18-21, 09:11 AM
  #4  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 7,276

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400, 2013 Novara Randonee, 1990 Trek 970

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1474 Post(s)
Liked 966 Times in 656 Posts
While I'm not really a flipper, i've done it often enough to have some experience. Local market matters.

I only consider mid or higher level bikes. I only sell "ready to ride" generally redoing all bearings, replacing consumables (tires, cables, chain, pads, tape, etc) as needed.
Clean and wax for curb appeal. Lots of good quality pictures. Ad with size measurements and suggested rider size.
Most everyday casual buyers are going to want index shifting. High end period correct won't matter but matching components matter. They are 2 different markets.
Honestly high end stuff makes the most money parted out but extends payback time and increases time and headaches involved.
Unusually big or small frames take longer, but often pay full price due to the limited market. If I put newer parts on an older frame I'd list it as "updated".
Price things realistically for your market.
Buy consumables in bulk on sale, rather than as needed.
Don't expect to quit your day job, more a hobby experience to finance your own habit.
dedhed is offline  
Likes For dedhed:
Old 01-18-21, 09:12 AM
  #5  
Mr. 66
Senior Member
 
Mr. 66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 1,521
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 468 Post(s)
Liked 316 Times in 231 Posts
I would try to find a local nonprofit used bikestore or coop for finding as-is full bikes and parts. I've gotten a few potentials at the goodwill type stores also.
Mr. 66 is online now  
Old 01-18-21, 10:03 AM
  #6  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 11,956

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 97 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4856 Post(s)
Liked 2,081 Times in 1,243 Posts
Originally Posted by Stormy Archer View Post
A few questions I have for the seasoned flippers.

Mainly, I'm looking at cheap older steel frame builds.

Do people tend to go for riser bar bikes a lot more than drop bars? Do people care if their road bikes have big tires or not? I certainly care, but no clue what the average guy thinks.

What are the types of things you think people care most about? Indexed shifting a big one? Is it a bad idea to try and sell an 80s steel road frame with a mish mash of slightly more modern parts, simply because it might look "bad" or have less character?

A while back I sold a beautiful purple bridgestone 400 for 200$ within days of listing it. I didn't think it was special other than the looks. I guess looks are something to pay more attention to... hence my ragged 531c Dawes that I got for 80$
I never flipped, but I did do a bunch of refurbishing, updating, and modernizing bikes then sold em. Here are some thoughts.

- If you are flipping, then just put the cheapest stuff on the bike that will get it to roll and call it a day.
- If you are wanting to refurbish/update then sell, what you choose matters a lot more.
- The bike should look good, as in ready to ride and look like its competently assembled. So it needs to be clean, cable length should look normal, bar tape should be well wrapped, brake pads properly aligned, shifting works well, etc.
- Scratches need to be minimal, or be prepared to sell for a good bit less. A bike that has trashed paint may work perfectly, but the appeal is WAY lower than one in good cosmetic condition. Touch up paint is dangerous since it so rarely matches. If the bike is black, then touch it up. If its any other color, take time and be prepared to accept the results will look like trash if you choose the wrong color because the wrong color will actually highlight the scratches.
- Cheap saddle is OK because who knows what style the buyer wants. Cheap bar tape is OK because its an easy and inexpensive change, and cheap tape is still plenty quality. Cheap pedals are OK because enthusiasts will have their own pedals and others dont care.
- Mismatched tires are lame. Thats just lazy.
- Poorly set up brake levers, saddle angle, and poor shifting scream amateur hour and should make buyers skeptical of anything else you have done.
- Road bikes sell faster with STI style shifting. Faster and for more $. I would rather use some $60 Microshift/Micronew 9sp shifters than downtube shifters because the bike will sell faster and at a higher price.


If you dont want to take the time to do it complete, just spray it down with water, spray some wd40 on the chain, and call it a day.
mstateglfr is online now  
Likes For mstateglfr:
Old 01-18-21, 12:17 PM
  #7  
SurferRosa
Señor Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 3,772

Bikes: Old school lightweights

Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1548 Post(s)
Liked 1,504 Times in 867 Posts
Read up.

https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...ing-101-a.html

I only do one thing real well, and that's flipping mid-level vintage road bikes after refurb'ing/fully overhauling them to near original spec. I sell what I want, not what the current bike fads might be. It's what keeps it enjoyable.

Last edited by SurferRosa; 01-18-21 at 12:21 PM.
SurferRosa is offline  
Likes For SurferRosa:
Old 01-18-21, 01:16 PM
  #8  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 7,630

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), Cilo Road Frame, Proteus frame, Ti 26 MTB

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2001 Post(s)
Liked 906 Times in 632 Posts
Wear a helmet and be prepared to crash sometimes, if you can get a crash pad that will help.
veganbikes is offline  
Likes For veganbikes:
Old 01-18-21, 05:12 PM
  #9  
homelessjoe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Ann Arbor Michigan
Posts: 143

Bikes: miyata 83 1000,84 1000,83 610,88 ridge runner ,Schwinn 84 high sierra,88 Cimmeron,86 Passage,84 Stumplumper ,83 Mt Whitney,83 Trek 850,Merckx Century,PX10, RB1,XO 1 XO 4,bunch of stuff like that

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked 42 Times in 34 Posts
flippy

I collected bikes since 1960.....building them is like making artwork for me ...an enjoyable hobby.....but of course you must purge and sell some off so you have room to continue....in the past I sold mostly to collectors and builders who didnt really care if it had new tires and cable ..brakes etc....people looking for great vintage bikes....they know the potential.....that market will always be there.........but now since the lockdown everyone wants a bike they can take home and ride right now trouble free...and it has to be turn key clean and shinny fully adjusted.......I would say most dont want curly cue handle bars....or racing bikes......they mostly want city bikes comfort bikes cruisers hybreds mountain bikes.....something they can drive around the neighborhood......cushy seats............dont sell your vintage bikes to them.......can you see your mint condition 83 Stumpjumper or Vanilla or Moots or Black Phanthom or DeRosa driven around the neighborhood once or twice and then parked behind the shed for 20 years left to rot......just the thought makes me shudder
homelessjoe is offline  
Old 01-18-21, 06:16 PM
  #10  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 7,276

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400, 2013 Novara Randonee, 1990 Trek 970

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1474 Post(s)
Liked 966 Times in 656 Posts
Originally Posted by homelessjoe View Post
can you see your mint condition 83 Stumpjumper or Vanilla or Moots or Black Phanthom or DeRosa driven around the neighborhood once or twice and then parked behind the shed for 20 years left to rot......just the thought makes me shudder
if they paid my asking price I'd get over it.
dedhed is offline  
Old 01-18-21, 07:13 PM
  #11  
Stormy Archer
7 speed freedom wheel
Thread Starter
 
Stormy Archer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 197
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 91 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I guess my situation is a little unique, because I seem to have a knack for finding frames, and I have a lot of parts.

I live in the bay area CA. If someone is paying 200$ for a bike with a vintage steel road frame do you think they're much more likely to want flat/ riser bars or drop bars? Also still wondering about bigger tires.

Last edited by Stormy Archer; 01-18-21 at 07:16 PM.
Stormy Archer is offline  
Old 01-18-21, 07:37 PM
  #12  
denaffen
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 51

Bikes: Bianchi Nyala, Bianchi Campione D'Italia, Luxus folding bike, Nishiki Sport, Bianchi Torino, KHS Aero Sport, probably something else around here somewhere

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 11 Posts
Not a flipper, more of a hobbyist, but I'd say broadly, there are two markets: If something's got really nice tubing and some sort of collectibility, those buyers will want drop bars, matched components, etc, and they'll be more willing (as noted above) to accept some things that aren't quite right, cause they'll tweak it themselves. I'd say these are at least $200, and usually considerably more. They're also harder to find as projects.

The second market is "pretty bikes" or "fun bikes" here you can pick up a half decent quality mid-range bike, clean it, sort it and flip it, usually for less than 200. In this market, cleanness and comfort reign. It's not necessarily bicyclists buying them, it's people who just want to knock around on a bike and want something a bit different. In this market, they often want upright bars, but it's tricky, because every update makes it harder to keep the bike within its market, price-wise.
denaffen is offline  
Old 01-18-21, 07:47 PM
  #13  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 7,276

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400, 2013 Novara Randonee, 1990 Trek 970

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1474 Post(s)
Liked 966 Times in 656 Posts
Originally Posted by Stormy Archer View Post
I live in the bay area CA. If someone is paying 200$ for a bike with a vintage steel road frame do you think they're much more likely to want flat/ riser bars or drop bars? Also still wondering about bigger tires.

That's why you have to research and know YOUR market.
dedhed is offline  
Old 01-18-21, 07:50 PM
  #14  
SurferRosa
Señor Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 3,772

Bikes: Old school lightweights

Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1548 Post(s)
Liked 1,504 Times in 867 Posts
Originally Posted by Stormy Archer View Post
... do you think they're much more likely to want flat/ riser bars or drop bars? Also still wondering about bigger tires.
If it originally came with drop bars, mount drop bars. Drop bars almost always command a higher price on road bikes.

Tires eat profit. Mount something that is appropriate for the build, matches, looks good, and is road ready. Don't worry so much about size. Let the buyer know what will fit. Avoid putting real cheap tires on a mid- or upper-level bike.
SurferRosa is offline  
Likes For SurferRosa:
Old 01-18-21, 08:14 PM
  #15  
homelessjoe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Ann Arbor Michigan
Posts: 143

Bikes: miyata 83 1000,84 1000,83 610,88 ridge runner ,Schwinn 84 high sierra,88 Cimmeron,86 Passage,84 Stumplumper ,83 Mt Whitney,83 Trek 850,Merckx Century,PX10, RB1,XO 1 XO 4,bunch of stuff like that

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked 42 Times in 34 Posts
tires

I think the whole bicycle industry is leaning toward fatter tires....gravel bikes are extremely popular.......everybody wants more of an all arounder or at least a frame that accepts fatter tires........on certain rougher road surfaces a little fatter tire has lower rolling resistance.....in Michigan the roads are so bad running one inch tires is a challenge..... in Ann Arbor they are building bicycle paths on a massive scale so now everybody wants commuters and grocery getters to go shopping on and out to lunch... go to class....old British three speeds have doubled in price
homelessjoe is offline  
Old 01-18-21, 08:21 PM
  #16  
homelessjoe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Ann Arbor Michigan
Posts: 143

Bikes: miyata 83 1000,84 1000,83 610,88 ridge runner ,Schwinn 84 high sierra,88 Cimmeron,86 Passage,84 Stumplumper ,83 Mt Whitney,83 Trek 850,Merckx Century,PX10, RB1,XO 1 XO 4,bunch of stuff like that

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked 42 Times in 34 Posts
middle

Originally Posted by Stormy Archer View Post
I guess my situation is a little unique, because I seem to have a knack for finding frames, and I have a lot of parts.

I live in the bay area CA. If someone is paying 200$ for a bike with a vintage steel road frame do you think they're much more likely to want flat/ riser bars or drop bars? Also still wondering about bigger tires.
I have one friend who has a box of drop bars that he replaced with flat bars and fatter tires on his builds......another builder friend has a box of flat bars from converting mountain bikes to drop bars with thiner road tire......so they are both building and selling all arounder town bikes
homelessjoe is offline  
Old 01-19-21, 11:47 AM
  #17  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 6,305

Bikes: '71 Jeunet 640, '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1167 Post(s)
Liked 930 Times in 508 Posts
In the DC market (winter months are more variable), the demand is great. A well preserved mid-level road bike (with drop bars) will fetch north of $400 without question. Easily and quickly.

A decent, rideable and complete road bike of entry level (but what had originally been a bike shop bike), will sell in the $275-325 range very quickly. What the OP describes would be of this type, if I understand him correctly.
Phil_gretz is offline  
Likes For Phil_gretz:
Old 01-19-21, 12:39 PM
  #18  
cbrstar
BMX Connoisseur
 
cbrstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Canada
Posts: 577

Bikes: 1988 Kuwahara Newport, 1983 Nishiki, 1984 Diamond Back Viper, 1991 Dyno Compe

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 293 Post(s)
Liked 30 Times in 21 Posts
Vintage 80's BMX bikes = Gold and some of the 1990's one are becoming very collectible. But you really have no know what you are looking at. Dept store will always be kinda worthless but sometimes they have a rare part on them that's valuable. And like anything cracks and dens kill the value. BMX flippers have a dislike for flippers but if it saves a piece of history from the recyclers I'm all for it.
cbrstar is offline  
Old 01-19-21, 07:54 PM
  #19  
decotriumph 
Senior Member
 
decotriumph's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Tullahoma, TN USA
Posts: 206

Bikes: 2021 Kona Lava Dome, 2016 Trek FX 7.4, 1991 Trek 2500, 1987 Schwinn Circuit, 1984 Raleigh Marathon, 1955 Indian Scout (Phillips), 1953 Monark El Dorado

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked 30 Times in 12 Posts
I would add three things, two of which fall in the category of "Know what you are selling."
1. Know what size frame it is and put that in the ad. Know the material, too. I'm amazed that some people can't tell the difference between steel and aluminum!
2. Know what components it has and put that in the ad, too. I am looking at a bike on eBay and the seller has taken lousy pictures that show no detail. I asked him what the groupset is, and his answer was that it was "original to the bike." I asked him what that was and he has no clue, not even the brand. I've been going back and forth with him for over a week. He still hasn't told me, promised pictures yesterday, which I still don't have.
3. Answer questions as quickly as possible. I'm looking at another bike on a forum (not this one) and I've been waiting over a week for shipping cost. I first started communication with the guy two weeks ago and he only answers messages every two or three days. This last time has been five so far and still no answer. I'm a moderator on that forum, so I can tell when he has been on there. He was there earlier today, still hasn't answered. With that kind of communication, I doubt I'll buy the bike; if he can't even carry on a conversation in reasonable time, how can I expect him to pack and ship?

OK, my advice turned into a rant! Sorry.
__________________
Alan M.
Tullahoma, TN
www.baker-cole.com


Last edited by decotriumph; 01-19-21 at 07:58 PM.
decotriumph is offline  
Old 01-20-21, 12:00 AM
  #20  
SurferRosa
Señor Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 3,772

Bikes: Old school lightweights

Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1548 Post(s)
Liked 1,504 Times in 867 Posts
Originally Posted by decotriumph View Post
Know what size frame it is and put that in the ad.
In the very least, I write three frame measurements in a separate paragraph in the body of my craigs ad: the top tube and seat tube c-c measurements (in cm) and the standover (in inches).

Because my focus is to quickly target a particular market, I also place the most important of these (top tube c-c) in the listing title.
SurferRosa is offline  
Likes For SurferRosa:
Old 01-23-21, 04:06 AM
  #21  
Stormy Archer
7 speed freedom wheel
Thread Starter
 
Stormy Archer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 197
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 91 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
In the DC market (winter months are more variable), the demand is great. A well preserved mid-level road bike (with drop bars) will fetch north of $400 without question. Easily and quickly.

A decent, rideable and complete road bike of entry level (but what had originally been a bike shop bike), will sell in the $275-325 range very quickly. What the OP describes would be of this type, if I understand him correctly.
Where do you draw the line between mid level and entry level? derailleur hanger? Those prices seem kinda nuts to me, and I'm in the bay area which I always thought had high prices!
the bike in particular I was asking about has stamped dropouts with no hanger, hi ten tubing, it's an 80s Raleigh gran sport or something like that. also it's her not him
Stormy Archer is offline  
Old 01-23-21, 06:22 AM
  #22  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 6,305

Bikes: '71 Jeunet 640, '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1167 Post(s)
Liked 930 Times in 508 Posts
Originally Posted by Stormy Archer View Post
Where do you draw the line between mid level and entry level? derailleur hanger?
I let the manufacturer tell me in their literature (or lore) whether this is a mid range or a top tier bike. I just sold a 1978 Raleigh Super Course, a mid level bike. Before that was a Centurion Dave Scott Ironman Master, also a mid level bike. Each was a fine example with higher quality tubing and reasonably good workmanship, mid level or better components, excellent overall ride qualities.

What you describe would be entry level.
Phil_gretz is offline  
Old 01-23-21, 06:28 AM
  #23  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 6,305

Bikes: '71 Jeunet 640, '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1167 Post(s)
Liked 930 Times in 508 Posts
Originally Posted by Stormy Archer View Post
Where do you draw the line between mid level and entry level? derailleur hanger?
I let the manufacturer tell me in their literature (or lore) whether this is a mid range or a top tier bike. I just sold a 1978 Raleigh Super Course, a mid level bike. Before that was a Centurion Dave Scott Ironman Master, also a mid level bike. Each was a fine example with higher quality tubing and reasonably good workmanship, mid level or better components, and excellent overall ride qualities.

Both of these stood out from other listing, and the buyers sought out those particular models.

What you describe would be entry level.

Whan I first saw your screen name I thought, "clever".
Phil_gretz is offline  
Old 01-23-21, 03:17 PM
  #24  
SurferRosa
Señor Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 3,772

Bikes: Old school lightweights

Mentioned: 50 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1548 Post(s)
Liked 1,504 Times in 867 Posts
Originally Posted by Stormy Archer View Post
Where do you draw the line between mid level and entry level? derailleur hanger?
That's a good start for a road bike (not track).

For vintage, if the post-'60s road bike has an on-frame hanger, cotterless crankset, chromoly main triangle (or better), aluminum rims, and mostly aluminum components, then it's likely at least lower mid-level.
SurferRosa is offline  
Old 01-23-21, 04:30 PM
  #25  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 7,276

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400, 2013 Novara Randonee, 1990 Trek 970

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1474 Post(s)
Liked 966 Times in 656 Posts
While Randy's site no longer exists, it is available in the archives.

https://web.archive.org/web/20190509...TRODUCTION.htm
dedhed is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.