Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Bonked

Old 06-05-17, 01:04 PM
  #26  
doctor j
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Louisiana
Posts: 3,055
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 40 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 1 Post
I bonked a couple of times last year and ended up with an ambulance ride to the ER each time. I had gotten progressively dehydrated during those weeks with riding and other outdoor activities, and my blood pressure was in the dirt each time. Each episode was my fault for not paying attention to hydration.

After a lot of miles, I've figured out what works well for me with regard to fuel and fluids. So far, after 3,100 miles in 2017, I've had no issues.

Currently my average ride is about 31 miles. Just before each ride, I take an Endurolyte, a tablespoon of honey, a "stress B" vitamin, and wash it all down with 20 ounces of water. I take one bottle of water and one bottle of water with Skratch hydration mix with me on the bike. I may or may not consume all of both depending on my speed, distance, heat, and humidity. I'm in central Louisiana, and we get the heat/humidity here.

For longer rides, I'll take along some combination of dried pineapple, Endurolytes, honey, peanut butter&crackers, a Clif Bar, and a bag or bags of Skratch powder depending on length/duration of ride. I've learned that those foods and my stomach play well together on longer rides.

For me, starting each ride as specified above has helped. As mentioned above by another respondent, Skratch is pretty good stuff. It seems to work for me.

Good luck. The bonk is frustrating. Stay with it, and experiment with methods of fueling and hydration that will work for you.
doctor j is offline  
Old 06-05-17, 01:17 PM
  #27  
memebag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,597

Bikes: 2017 Cannondale CAAD12 105, 2014 Giant Escape City

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 820 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Just so we're all on the same page, these are the symptoms of hypoglycemia, aka "bonking":

Heart palpitations
Fatigue
Pale skin
Shakiness
Anxiety
Sweating
Hunger
Irritability
Tingling sensation around the mouth
Crying out during sleep
Confusion, abnormal behavior or both, such as the inability to complete routine tasks
Visual disturbances, such as blurred vision
Seizures
Loss of consciousness

I bonked once, when I went on my first 2 hour ride. I will never bonk again.
memebag is offline  
Old 06-05-17, 05:21 PM
  #28  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 10,544

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 179 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3344 Post(s)
Liked 720 Times in 494 Posts
If you've experienced a hypoglycemic bonk the worst thing you can do for your body is rely on simple sugar as fuel. That's a guaranteed rebound bonk in 30-60 minutes. Usually it follows a deceptive burst of energy but it doesn't last and the rebound effect can be even worse. It's an indicator for metabolic problems and possible onset of diabetes. For folks with hypoglycemia, simple sugars should be used only for emergency purposes to recover from a bonk and regain muscle coordination to get to a safe place to rest and recover, not for continuing a ride.

Another indicator or signal: If you experience an energy burst from a single beer or similar alcoholic beverage (around 4%-9% ABV) that lasts 30-60 minutes. If that refreshes your energy level comparably to a sugary drink or snack, followed by sudden drowsiness and loss of energy, you may have metabolic indicators for hypoglycemia.

If you've experienced those symptoms it's probably going to be a lifelong battle. You can use simple sugars to recover for emergency purposes, but don't rely on this as fuel to continue a bike ride or other activities. You need to consider a long term solution, including an overall dietary change.

For long term improvement to avoid hypoglycemia the easiest and most efficient diet for long lasting fuel includes more meat and fats, including butter. Tough assignment for vegetarians and vegans.

Carbs are fine for short to moderate term fuel but eventually you'll bonk again without a solid foundation diet that includes the fuel most efficiently provided by meats and fats.

There are many opinions and experts on this stuff. I'm not an expert on anything other than my own body. At age 59 I've been through the hypoglycemia routine since childhood so I know what works for me.
canklecat is offline  
Old 06-05-17, 07:32 PM
  #29  
memebag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,597

Bikes: 2017 Cannondale CAAD12 105, 2014 Giant Escape City

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 820 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
No, the way to avoid bonking is keep consuming sugar. The treatment for bonking is consume sugar. Simple sugars work best as long as you keep consuming them.
memebag is offline  
Old 06-05-17, 07:46 PM
  #30  
MikeOK
Yo
 
MikeOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Ozark Mountains
Posts: 1,609

Bikes: 2003 Yeti AS-R, 2018 Waltly ti

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 429 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by memebag View Post
No, the way to avoid bonking is keep consuming sugar. The treatment for bonking is consume sugar. Simple sugars work best as long as you keep consuming them.
For most people this is true. When I was completely bonked I ate a gu and it made me feel worse.
MikeOK is offline  
Old 06-05-17, 09:34 PM
  #31  
exmechanic89
Senior Member
 
exmechanic89's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Richmond VA area
Posts: 2,717

Bikes: '00 Koga Miyata Full Pro Oval Road bike.

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 474 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
Try an experiment: When you wake up, have a banana and maybe a piece of toast. Then go for a 25 mile ride, and keep fully hydrated with just water. I am going to go out on a limb here, but I think you will feel perfectly fine at the end of it.
Yep. 25 miles isnt very far on a bike - that should be adequate.

On the sugar drinks, I say to avoid. You're trying to lose weight and those are just empty calories. Use a Sugar-free version of Powerade or similar if you want a sports drink. Otherwise drink water. I ride 40-50 miles daily at a decent pace and normally stop in the middle to eat an energy bar and drink a bottle of water. Or sometimes a banana and I do just fine.

I wouldnt go crazy on carbs as you're not really riding very far, and you are as mentioned, trying to lose weight. Imo your newness to cycling is probably what caused the bad feelings that day. Just hang in there and continue to ride/practice.
exmechanic89 is offline  
Old 06-05-17, 10:24 PM
  #32  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 10,544

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 179 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3344 Post(s)
Liked 720 Times in 494 Posts
Originally Posted by memebag View Post
No, the way to avoid bonking is keep consuming sugar. The treatment for bonking is consume sugar. Simple sugars work best as long as you keep consuming them.
I hope you'll reconsider that dietary philosophy. It's dangerous for routinely treating hypoglycemia. We're not hummingbirds. Save the simple sugars/glucose for emergencies, which should be rare.

The best way to avoid bonking is a diet that provides for short term and long term energy. That ain't simple sugar or glucose.

Most people have experienced at least one episode of low blood sugar. If you know anyone who gets hangry -- suddenly irritable from hunger -- that's hypoglycemia. But if it happens more often it's probably due to other underlying illnesses and/or chronic dietary problems. But that requires a medical diagnosis.

I carry gel packs, snacks and glucose tablets for emergencies. Glukos tablets from sporting goods stores are good and usually cheaper than the same thing marketed to diabetics in pharmacies. But I don't take 'em unless I feel a bonk coming on, which I try to avoid by eating properly.
canklecat is offline  
Old 06-05-17, 10:51 PM
  #33  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,799

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3088 Post(s)
Liked 276 Times in 175 Posts
Originally Posted by bscarpenter View Post
I've been back to cycling for about 4 months. My goals are to 1) lose weight 2) improve my cardio health 3) work my way up to a 50 mile ride for my 50th birthday 6mo from now.

I've been riding three evenings per week with one longer ride on the weekend trying to improve my stamina and speed. I live in the sub-tropical climate of South Florida. Right now, my weekday evening rides are a 10mi loop and I've worked up to a 25mi weekend ride down the beach. This Saturday, I did my 25mi ride and averaged 10.5mph including traffic lights and 2 draw bridges. It was overcast and rained most of the time so heat wasn't really an issue. I drank 2.5 bottles of water on the ride.

I ate oatmeal before I left on the 25mi ride. When I got home, I stretched and showered and felt so low energy that I might fall down. I had a banana and went to get breakfast with my family. I ate an egg white omelette, two pieces of toast and a fruit cup and some juice. I still felt like crap. I had plenty of water.

I started to think electrolytes may have been the issue. What are your suggestions for not bonking on these longer rides?
Bonking is essentially low blood sugar. In other words, you need to eat. What did you eat before you went out on the ride?
Machka is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 03:11 AM
  #34  
coominya
Senior Member
 
coominya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Brisbane Aust
Posts: 1,643

Bikes: Giant ToughRoad Giant talon

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 703 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Very difficult to suggest anything because everyone's metabolism is different. I know if I don't have a decent dinner the night before I will be stuffed but I never eat the morning before I ride. Crazy as it sounds after I wake up I might have 2 or 3 cups of coffee with a level teaspoon of honey in them, then I'm off on a 40km loop. If I have breakfast I wouldn't get out the door, I'd be too lethargic, so it's horses for courses.
coominya is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 04:42 AM
  #35  
luddite_68
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
luddite_68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: South Florida
Posts: 154

Bikes: GT Zum & Fuji Gran Fondo

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 82 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Bonking is essentially low blood sugar. In other words, you need to eat. What did you eat before you went out on the ride?
I ate oatmeal before I left on the 25mi ride.
luddite_68 is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 05:37 AM
  #36  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,799

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3088 Post(s)
Liked 276 Times in 175 Posts
Originally Posted by bscarpenter View Post
I ate oatmeal before I left on the 25mi ride.
Oatmeal works well for Rowan (my husband) but not for me. I'm really hungry about half an hour after I eat it.

Maybe you needed a granola bar mid ride.
Machka is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 05:42 AM
  #37  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 11,287

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, Catrike Speed

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1063 Post(s)
Liked 152 Times in 108 Posts
Must be just fatigue. At 35 Calories per mile, you only burned 875 Calories; easily covered by your body's existing stores. And at 10-11 mph in the flatlands of Florida, even a couple of bridges won't make enough difference to say so in the final Calorie count.

I'd say, your body isn't used to the extended exertion, so don't be afraid to take a nap afterward.
BlazingPedals is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 05:50 AM
  #38  
memebag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,597

Bikes: 2017 Cannondale CAAD12 105, 2014 Giant Escape City

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 820 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
I hope you'll reconsider that dietary philosophy. It's dangerous for routinely treating hypoglycemia. We're not hummingbirds. Save the simple sugars/glucose for emergencies, which should be rare.

The best way to avoid bonking is a diet that provides for short term and long term energy. That ain't simple sugar or glucose.

Most people have experienced at least one episode of low blood sugar. If you know anyone who gets hangry -- suddenly irritable from hunger -- that's hypoglycemia. But if it happens more often it's probably due to other underlying illnesses and/or chronic dietary problems. But that requires a medical diagnosis.

I carry gel packs, snacks and glucose tablets for emergencies. Glukos tablets from sporting goods stores are good and usually cheaper than the same thing marketed to diabetics in pharmacies. But I don't take 'em unless I feel a bonk coming on, which I try to avoid by eating properly.
Your diet off the bike can give you 90 minutes of glycogen. That's all the long term energy you can take with you, and just about any diet will do that. After that you need sugar consumed on the bike. And we are just like hummingbirds that way. Sugar transfers energy to our muscles.

Humans break down different sugars and carbohydrates at different rates, at different efficiencies. The fastest and most efficient is glucose. You can consume less of it than the others and use that energy more rapidly. It's easier to auto-titrate or self regulate because the feedback loop is shorter.

I don't understand the opposition to simple sugars while biking.
memebag is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 10:00 AM
  #39  
supton
Cries on hills
 
supton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Central NH
Posts: 1,088

Bikes: 2007 Trek Pilot 1.2, 1969 Raleigh Sprite 5

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm trying to avoid sugar, at least when I can. It might be quackery but there seems to be enough quacks saying it's bad for you. I figure, when Gatorade tastes good (let alone great) then I'm doing something wrong (ridden too far, too little in, whatever). I think I'd rather bump fat intake if I really need more calories (eggs, nuts).

But I'm not trying to ride at 90% effort for hours at a time either.
supton is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 10:10 AM
  #40  
hueyhoolihan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Above ground, Walnut Creek, Ca
Posts: 6,681

Bikes: 8 ss bikes, 1 5-speed touring bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
one would think that, from some of the things written here, that mammals hadn't evolved over millions of years a natural inclination to eat sensibly by virtue of a thing called 'appetite'. but rather to consciously decide what foods to and when to eat them.
hueyhoolihan is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 10:34 AM
  #41  
supton
Cries on hills
 
supton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Central NH
Posts: 1,088

Bikes: 2007 Trek Pilot 1.2, 1969 Raleigh Sprite 5

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I dunno, when I eat according to my appetite, I tend to put on weight. Other times I know I must force myself to drink water, I might not be thirsty but I know I'm dehydrated.

It's a weird thing, sometimes the mind needs to take control over what the body "thinks" it needs. Furthermore, I'm not sure evolution could have predicted the subsidies given to the food industry (nor could it predict that we'll all have couches and TV's someday).
supton is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 11:02 AM
  #42  
MikeOK
Yo
 
MikeOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Ozark Mountains
Posts: 1,609

Bikes: 2003 Yeti AS-R, 2018 Waltly ti

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 429 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by supton View Post
(nor could it predict that we'll all have couches and TV's someday).
Lol, and remote controls, I have 4 remotes on the table next to my recliner, one for the tv, one for the firestik, one for the chromecast and one for the cd player.
MikeOK is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 11:28 AM
  #43  
supton
Cries on hills
 
supton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Central NH
Posts: 1,088

Bikes: 2007 Trek Pilot 1.2, 1969 Raleigh Sprite 5

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by MikeOK View Post
Lol, and remote controls, I have 4 remotes on the table next to my recliner, one for the tv, one for the firestik, one for the chromecast and one for the cd player.
Lucky you. My two remotes keep saying "no daddy, you go do it." Ingrates!
supton is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 12:41 PM
  #44  
OldTryGuy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: SW Fl.
Posts: 4,660

Bikes: 1981 Custom Touring Paramount, 1983 Road Paramount, 2013 Giant Propel Advanced SL3, 2018 Specialized Red Roubaix Expert mech., 2002 Magna 7sp hybrid, 1976 Bassett Racing 45sp Cruiser

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 749 Post(s)
Liked 146 Times in 100 Posts
My FUELING for a ride begins the day before......I eat properly to top off glycogen stores for overnight sleeping. Sleep does happen to consume some of those stores and thus a proper early morning re-topping is in order if a long ride is planned. Topping off with OATMEAL an hour before going out on a ride MIGHT CAUSE ISSUES because the oatmeal will still be digesting (90 minutes) in the stomach requiring the use of oxygenated blood to be digested.

Helpful digesting times.....

Digestion Time Of Foods Is The Time Spent In The Stomach Before Emptying.

While riding if I have that helping of nuts, pb&j, cheese, a potato, some chips, pretzels...etc it all requires oxygenated blood to be digested and the longer it takes to digest-the less blood is available for my leg muscles and BRAIN ACTIVITY. Quick, easily digested foods i.e.- sugars(candy), gels, water laden fruits quickly provides energy to prevent bonking but I follow with proper continuation of fueling so as to NOT CAUSE AN ISSUE after consuming. NOTE--that burger might taste great and fill my stomach BUT it will not taste great if it finds itself coming up when attacking a climb shortly after consumption.

NOTE--gels have been formulated to pass on the energy within minutes of consumption. One can make one's own gel to reduce the cost per serving and garbage factor.

The harder and more intense the activity, the greater the need for proper and adequate fueling. Once one gets behind in fueling/hydration it becomes harder to maintain levels of higher physical output.

My prostate cancer treatment protocol has me taking Metformin which is often prescribed for diabetes. It prevent the digestion/absorption of carbs to create glycogen. EVERY DAY I wake up without the stores needed for normal daily activity and even worse when heading out for a good day's ride. I rise 4 to 5 hours before riding to take my thyroid meds. allowing 1 to 2 hours before eating which then gives my system enough time for digestion/topping of the reduced carbs for glycogen production.
OldTryGuy is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 12:49 PM
  #45  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 25,285
Mentioned: 189 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10397 Post(s)
Liked 1,813 Times in 1,051 Posts
As noted in post 14, true bonking is the depletion of glycogen supplies. The term has been bastardized to include any time one feels tired or otherwise not right during or after a ride (e.g. as a result of becoming dehydrated).
indyfabz is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 12:50 PM
  #46  
memebag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,597

Bikes: 2017 Cannondale CAAD12 105, 2014 Giant Escape City

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 820 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by supton View Post
I'm trying to avoid sugar, at least when I can. It might be quackery but there seems to be enough quacks saying it's bad for you.
Eating a lot of sugar while sedentary is bad for you, sure. But replenishing sugar while riding a bike is good for you. It prevents hypoglycemia, the topic of this thread.

Originally Posted by hueyhoolihan View Post
one would think that, from some of the things written here, that mammals hadn't evolved over millions of years a natural inclination to eat sensibly by virtue of a thing called 'appetite'. but rather to consciously decide what foods to and when to eat them.
We didn't evolve to ride bikes. We evolved to walk very long distances slowly, punctuated by sprints, so we're very efficient at that and the feedback loops in our gut and nervous system work well at that frequency. Riding a bike at 20mph for 70 miles can make you hypoglycemic before your brain registers hunger. We also need to drink before we're thirsty under those conditions.

We have consciously decided to live in a way that isn't exactly what we evolved for, so we have to consciously decide how to eat and drink (and sometimes breathe).
memebag is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 01:06 PM
  #47  
nycphotography
NYC
 
nycphotography's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 3,628
Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1094 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by bscarpenter View Post
I think next weekend, I will mix a bottle of gatorade in my 2 water bottles and see if that helps. I didn't think i should need anything to eat on a 2hr 15min ride.
If you are/tend to be hypoglycemic, then do say so. otherwise....

25 miles shouldn't be over 1000 calories, probably closer to 800. "Bonking" (ie burning all the sugar from your blood and liver, and overtaxing your energy production systems to where they go into shock and shut down) is unlikely.

You are probably just teaching your body that it has to burn fat instead of sugar, and when it burns sugar it has to replenish by converting back from fat.

Also, you were probably dehydrated. drink more water. no just on the bike. the night before, and after the ride too.

You can try gatorade on the bike... half strength, with an added pinch of morton lite (potassium + sodium). that way you arent taking on as much sugar as full strength gatorade.
nycphotography is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 01:14 PM
  #48  
supton
Cries on hills
 
supton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Central NH
Posts: 1,088

Bikes: 2007 Trek Pilot 1.2, 1969 Raleigh Sprite 5

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by memebag View Post
Eating a lot of sugar while sedentary is bad for you, sure. But replenishing sugar while riding a bike is good for you. It prevents hypoglycemia, the topic of this thread.
Fair enough. I'm going to run the risk, it's taken a while to get rid of my sweet tooth, and I don't want to encourage it to come back. I'm going to limit myself to a serving of fruit, maybe two, while on the bike, nothing more. Don't have time to ride for hours on end anyhow; and if I do... I might as well pace myself a bit and let the digestive tract do what it's good at.
supton is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 01:19 PM
  #49  
memebag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,597

Bikes: 2017 Cannondale CAAD12 105, 2014 Giant Escape City

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 820 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by supton View Post
Fair enough. I'm going to run the risk, it's taken a while to get rid of my sweet tooth, and I don't want to encourage it to come back. I'm going to limit myself to a serving of fruit, maybe two, while on the bike, nothing more. Don't have time to ride for hours on end anyhow; and if I do... I might as well pace myself a bit and let the digestive tract do what it's good at.
How long do you ride? Bonking is really only a problem for novice riders around 1 hour, experienced riders around 1.5 hours.
memebag is offline  
Old 06-06-17, 01:26 PM
  #50  
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Posts: 30,977

Bikes: 2010 Expedition, 03 GTO

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 710 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by memebag View Post
How long do you ride? Bonking is really only a problem for novice riders around 1 hour, experienced riders around 1.5 hours.
Bonking is Low Blood Sugar in your Brain.
It can occur anytime the Sugar level goes Down
__________________
Fred "The Real Fred"
10 Wheels is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.