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Modernizing a Classic: 1984 Trek 760

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Modernizing a Classic: 1984 Trek 760

Old 08-06-19, 08:38 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by CV-6 View Post
I think you would be better served running fatter tires, but I am pretty sure you are going to be limited by the frame.
An '84 Trek 760 should handle 28mm wide tires no problem, maybe even 32mm.

What is the seat lug on the OP's bike? If it has the seat stays attached to the sides of the lug, 32mm should be fine. If it has the more modern investment cast "fastback" lug, it might be a little tighter. Measure the width of the stay separation at the tire radius to be sure.
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Old 08-06-19, 08:42 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by jethin View Post
Congrats, you’ve come a long way baby. Sell the Trek and get a Surly, prob a LHT. Build it, put fatties on it and ride. You’re welcome.
I bought an LHT about the time I was giving up on the 760. It was well made and very stable. However, it felt equally as "dead" to me as the 760. It was also HEAVY. Perhaps I would have loved it if I wanted a true Tourer, but I didn't.

People have different preferences, but I've found that 1970's Raleigh Internationals and Competitions are spirited riders that adapt to multiple configurations very readily - and which accommodate "fatties", and which go up hills and weigh 3-5 pounds less than did the LHT when all built up. They can be found for considerably less $$ than a new LHT also.
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Old 08-06-19, 08:55 AM
  #28  
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Yeah, well, that's just, like, your opinion, man. Do what you like, eh?

I suppose it's a terrible idea to call John out on fitting 32mm tires in a 760, but that's what I'm gonna do. Like most fools I will never admit to being wrong, but visual evidence of actual 32mm measured 700c tires might cause me to raise an eyebrow.

Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
An '84 Trek 760 should handle 28mm wide tires no problem, maybe even 32mm.

What is the seat lug on the OP's bike? If it has the seat stays attached to the sides of the lug, 32mm should be fine. If it has the more modern investment cast "fastback" lug, it might be a little tighter. Measure the width of the stay separation at the tire radius to be sure.

Last edited by jethin; 08-06-19 at 12:05 PM.
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Old 08-06-19, 10:58 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by USAZorro View Post
I bought an LHT about the time I was giving up on the 760. It was well made and very stable. However, it felt equally as "dead" to me ...
Yup. That's the deal with the LHT. People don't talk about it, but it's a real thing. Dead feel.
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Old 08-06-19, 11:19 AM
  #30  
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I'd recommend the 650B option. A nice 650Bx38mm tire like the Paris Moto or Compass (René Herse) Loup Loup pass would help smooth out our lousy, bumpy, pot holed, so-called streets. If you like the feel of them, order a custom that will fit 42mm tires from a local builder.
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Old 08-06-19, 12:16 PM
  #31  
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Ok, I’m going to clarify my points and then check out. 1) If you’re considering modding a race bike for more “general” riding (fat tires, carrying loads, upright position, etc) also consider trying a different frameset. 2) For many folks a modern frameset will offer some advantages (and some disadvantages). 3) Everybody is different — do what works for you. Good luck op, go for a ride!

Last edited by jethin; 08-06-19 at 12:27 PM.
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Old 08-06-19, 12:34 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by USAZorro View Post
I had one of these about 8 - 9 years ago. It wasn't a bad bicycle by any means. It was light and the frame was nicely finished, but I simply didn't enjoy riding it as much as I did riding other bikes that I had. The frame geometry and (lack of) fittings made the frame suitable for racing, and I had other, more comfortable bikes that I made better time on than I did on that Trek.

I do get the power of sentimentality, (I have a fleet of 1970's Raleighs of nearly every conceivable model to prove it) but a bike that's built with such a single purpose in mind truly limits your options, and is going to be more costly to modify than it would be to simply find another bike that better suits what you want it for. I've gone that route as well, so I'm simply offering perspective - not trying to push my viewpoint on you. I am simply suggesting that you may benefit from giving equal consideration to the option of what it would take to get you the bike that starts off meeting whatever your riding needs and desires are - as opposed to willing your beloved 760 to be "more suitable" for you.
Hi Zorro!

I'm pretty sure we interacted a fair bit when I built that bike the first time around almost 10 years ago. Hope you're well! I recall your bike I think. It was part of the inspiration for mine. I honestly did enjoy riding mine a fair amount back in the day, but it was definitely pretty flexy, especially compared to the CAAD9. I weigh 175-180 now vs the 150-155 I did when I raced in college.

Originally Posted by jethin View Post
I hear you, but there's something to be said for getting a modern frame that's compatible with contemporary components, well designed, in good/new condition and basically good to go out of the box. Even if one bought a brand new LHT if you ride it for ten years it's a good investment. I think they look pretty classic too.

Modding a 760 to be a "tourer" isn't a good idea IMHO. But hey, to each their own.
I sold my 1984 Trek 520 to a friend in Boston that had his commuter bike stolen. That bike was built up as a tourer. I used to get a metric ton of groceries on it using panniers. No delusions of doing that with this build.

It was sad to split up the 'twins' though... But I hadn't ridden the bike in ages and a friend needed a bike to get around. That was a great setup.
1X8 with a bar end shifter and a chainguard for a big ring with an old deore MTB RD. Ultegra crankset with octalink bb. Smooth as buttahhh.

But not for this bike.

Originally Posted by TenGrainBread View Post
The OP wants to put a carbon fork and newer Dura Ace on his bike. I think you're the first one to bring up the idea of making his Trek into a tourer
Haha yeah, not sure where that came from!

Originally Posted by jethin View Post
Ok, I’m going to clarify my points and then check out. 1) If you’re considering modding a race bike for more “general” riding (fat tires, carrying loads, upright position, etc) also consider trying a different frameset. 2) For many folks a modern frameset will offer some advantages (and some disadvantages). 3) Everybody is different — do what works for you. Good luck op, go for a ride!
Okay, those are some good thoughts.

1) Not looking to really carry loads unless you're referring to my caboose. The frame looks like it has space for 32's. I've ridden 28's on it for years. I don't think putting some slightly thicker road tires will ruin the geometry of the bike in any way. My thoughts are either to sell this bike as is or mod it so I can ride it again. I don't think I'm going to get much for it. I only got 500 for my CAAD9 with DA7800. I figure I might get 400-500 for this bike with SSFG setup.

2) Totally agree with you re: modern frames. I think I want that too... maybe. But if I'm going to sell this bike I want to atleast enjoy it again first and give it a new lease ya know?

Last edited by ridethecliche; 08-06-19 at 12:50 PM.
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Old 08-06-19, 12:51 PM
  #33  
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IMHO a carbon fork is a waste of money if the objective is a smoother ride.

For a real difference, change the tires. Go to 28 or even 32 if they fit. Some brands/models will feel smoother within the same size.

A Ti railed saddle also makes some difference, at least when seated. Titanium is springier than steel, and you can feel the difference.
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Old 08-06-19, 01:06 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
Okay, those are some good thoughts.

1) Not looking to really carry loads unless you're referring to my caboose. The frame looks like it has space for 32's. I've ridden 28's on it for years. I don't think putting some slightly thicker road tires will ruin the geometry of the bike in any way. My thoughts are either to sell this bike as is or mod it so I can ride it again. I don't think I'm going to get much for it. I only got 500 for my CAAD9 with DA7800. I figure I might get 400-500 for this bike with SSFG setup.

2) Totally agree with you re: modern frames. I think I want that too... maybe. But if I'm going to sell this bike I want to atleast enjoy it again first and give it a new lease ya know?
I hear ya brother. It sounds like you know what you're doing and what you want. So I'm going to go ahead and entrust your bike to you at this point.

PS: For my money tires are a good way to improve ride quality. Folks here generally seem to like Compass' offerings among others...
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Old 08-06-19, 02:18 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
Hi Zorro!

I'm pretty sure we interacted a fair bit when I built that bike the first time around almost 10 years ago. Hope you're well! I recall your bike I think. It was part of the inspiration for mine. I honestly did enjoy riding mine a fair amount back in the day, but it was definitely pretty flexy, especially compared to the CAAD9. I weigh 175-180 now vs the 150-155 I did when I raced in college.
Hi. I'm doing well. I passed along the Trek 760 I'd purchased from CL and got a free paint job from Dr. Deltron on quite a few years back. Despite the lightness and the Dura-Ace componentry that were on it, I never liked riding it as much as the Bob Jackson I had picked up for a song, Actually, both of them were a bit small for me, but for whatever reason, (maybe it was just the tires), I just never got the good feeling with that bike that I had with some others.

Now that I know what I DO like, I have built a bit of a themed collection around it. Getting settled in a new home this summer and have yet to get out on the road, but it will happen before we get far into fall.

Good luck sorting it out with your Trek. I have about 5 pounds on you at the moment, and I've become a bit fanatical about quality, higher volume tires. They are transformational - at least for me, and the way I prefer to ride.
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Old 08-06-19, 03:39 PM
  #36  
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I would strongly recommend against an LHT (or any beefy road tourer) unless you're planning on riding with a heavy rear load. Their frames are optimized for rear-load stability, not pedaling.

My VO Campeur handles lively enough, but when I use it for spirited riding, I can't find a power stroke that brings the frame to life.
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Old 08-06-19, 06:59 PM
  #37  
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Guys, the whole LHT thing started because of an offhand comment I made. I thought from a quick reading of the thread that the op was interested in more of an all arounder for longer rides. So I apologize for confusion, but maybe we could let it die? Maybe the touring forum would be a better place for opinions on the LHT?
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Old 08-06-19, 07:42 PM
  #38  
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I forgive you!

(If you help me find some parts that is!)
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Old 08-06-19, 09:03 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
An '84 Trek 760 should handle 28mm wide tires no problem, maybe even 32mm.

What is the seat lug on the OP's bike? If it has the seat stays attached to the sides of the lug, 32mm should be fine. If it has the more modern investment cast "fastback" lug, it might be a little tighter. Measure the width of the stay separation at the tire radius to be sure.
John, looking at the pictures of the bike it has the Investment Cast seat lug so might be limited to 28c.

One of the things that made the Trek 760/770 frame not as desirable for racing in the day was the geometry which was more road racing verses the Crit bike many were making at that time. This bike has more relaxed angles and a lower bottom bracket which looks to be the perfect set up for what the OP. This bike was very well made with a beautiful hand made fork. If build it up and ride the deal out of the think.☺

At the time this bike was built I was scheduled the production and John was building some of the awesome proto-types and we were scrounging up the parts for my Lunar Cycles track bike as an after hours moonlighting project.☺
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Old 08-06-19, 09:28 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by Paul J View Post
John, looking at the pictures of the bike it has the Investment Cast seat lug so might be limited to 28c.

One of the things that made the Trek 760/770 frame not as desirable for racing in the day was the geometry which was more road racing verses the Crit bike many were making at that time. This bike has more relaxed angles and a lower bottom bracket which looks to be the perfect set up for what the OP. This bike was very well made with a beautiful hand made fork. If build it up and ride the deal out of the think.☺

At the time this bike was built I was scheduled the production and John was building some of the awesome proto-types and we were scrounging up the parts for my Lunar Cycles track bike as an after hours moonlighting project.☺

I don't quite understand the last bit of your post, but wanted to thank you for the geometry info. I also wanted to add that I actually bought this bike out in PA. Possibly in lancaster area!
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Old 08-06-19, 09:32 PM
  #41  
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I don't think the pictures are showing up, but here's what I had the bike set up as when I raced on it in college a few times. Sorry about the obnoxious watermark.



Come to think of it... it'd be kind of nice to do this over again! I had the campy stuff working with shimano wheels/cassette and could get a shiftmate now to make it work even better.
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Old 08-06-19, 09:46 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
I don't quite understand the last bit of your post, but wanted to thank you for the geometry info. I also wanted to add that I actually bought this bike out in PA. Possibly in lancaster area!
Sorry, on the last part, John and I both worked at Trek when your frame was built and I was reminiscing a bit. Lancaster has a very active cycling community and great roads to ride.
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Old 08-07-19, 06:15 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Paul J View Post
At the time this bike was built I was scheduled the production and John was building some of the awesome proto-types and we were scrounging up the parts for my Lunar Cycles track bike as an after hours moonlighting project.☺
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
I don't quite understand the last bit of your post, but wanted to thank you for the geometry info. I also wanted to add that I actually bought this bike out in PA. Possibly in lancaster area!
Paul was also working at Trek at the time, and I built him a nice track frame:

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Old 08-07-19, 01:37 PM
  #44  
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OP +1 on give it a new lease and ride it, what do have to lose? As for parts you can check the sales forum here of course and the bay but if you have a Co-op near you (and I have to think there are a few in the Boston Metroplex) that may be a good source of parts for you. Have fun.
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Old 08-07-19, 08:44 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by ryansu View Post
OP +1 on give it a new lease and ride it, what do have to lose? As for parts you can check the sales forum here of course and the bay but if you have a Co-op near you (and I have to think there are a few in the Boston Metroplex) that may be a good source of parts for you. Have fun.
No longer in the Beantown area.

Sales forum here is pretty sparse but....

I just impulse bought used ultegra 6700 shifters with 105 FD/RD and a 11-32 cassette.

Now to find a compact crank!

The cassette might be a bit much, to be honest, so I'll likely end up using a 12-25 or 12-27. Too much space between gears I would think...

Hoping to find a 50/34 or 50/36. crankset.
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Old 08-07-19, 09:45 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by jethin View Post
Congrats, you’ve come a long way baby. Sell the Trek and get a Surly, prob a LHT. Build it, put fatties on it and ride. You’re welcome.
Jethin has a point. Whatever money you spend on a "racing" frame will never make much of a difference. Short chainstays and wheelbase and an upright geometry will do you in.
Turning a hybrid or sport bike into a tourer will be much easier, cheaper and more satisfying in the long run. Wider tires and a longer wheelbase will give you the comfort you crave. Here's a used Nashbar hybrid conversion that ended up costing a couple hundred.(minus the saddle).
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Old 08-07-19, 09:56 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by Cycle Tourist View Post
Jethin has a point. Whatever money you spend on a "racing" frame will never make much of a difference. Short chainstays and wheelbase and an upright geometry will do you in.
Turning a hybrid or sport bike into a tourer will be much easier, cheaper and more satisfying in the long run. Wider tires and a longer wheelbase will give you the comfort you crave. Here's a used Nashbar hybrid conversion that ended up costing a couple hundred.(minus the saddle).
I have zero interest in doing any of the things that you mention. We've already established this.

Glad you're enjoying that bike and that it's doing what you want of it!
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Old 08-07-19, 10:05 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by Cycle Tourist View Post
Jethin has a point. Whatever money you spend on a "racing" frame will never make much of a difference. Short chainstays and wheelbase and an upright geometry will do you in.
Turning a hybrid or sport bike into a tourer will be much easier, cheaper and more satisfying in the long run. Wider tires and a longer wheelbase will give you the comfort you crave. Here's a used Nashbar hybrid conversion that ended up costing a couple hundred.(minus the saddle).
Oops. I just read the comments about not wanting a touring bike. Oh well. I still see a "new"more laid back bike in your future.
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Old 08-07-19, 10:42 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by Cycle Tourist View Post
Oops. I just read the comments about not wanting a touring bike. Oh well. I still see a "new"more laid back bike in your future.
You mean like buying another 1984 trek 520 that I sold to a friend after his commuter got stolen?

I'll likely end up with a relaxed geometry modern bike like a synapse or domane in addition to this bike. I'd rather do it with this bike now instead of waiting though.

And no harm no foul. Input welcome!
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Old 08-08-19, 12:16 AM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post
You mean like buying another 1984 trek 520 that I sold to a friend after his commuter got stolen?

I'll likely end up with a relaxed geometry modern bike like a synapse or domane in addition to this bike. I'd rather do it with this bike now instead of waiting though.

And no harm no foul. Input welcome!
Thanks. I suppose your right about the 520. I'm not a modern bike guy. I'd more likely be looking for a Nishiki, Miyata, Univega, Panasonic type sport bike. I see them on CL sometimes for 1 or 1:50. The 520 is a bit sadate even for me. I prefer my Klein Performance.
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