Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
Reload this Page >

I failed this year. Ideas to succeed next?

Notices
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

I failed this year. Ideas to succeed next?

Old 12-07-19, 12:39 PM
  #26  
zjrog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,367

Bikes: 1986 KHS Fiero, 1989 Trek 950, 1990 Trek 7000, 1992 Trek 1400, 1998 Cannondale R200, 2010 Performance Access XCL9R

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 179 Post(s)
Liked 112 Times in 84 Posts
@TinyBear, I did not meet all my goals for this year. But I refuse to say I failed.

Goals are good, but allow some flexibility. So I didn't meet all my goals this year. I did much better than years past.

Is it possible for you to get your bike on a trainer and get some time indoors? That was what got me going this past year. 20 minutes, 30 minutes at a time. Yesterday I decided I need 135 miles before the end of the month. 5.4 miles a day is all I need. Wife has been in the hospital the last 2 days. So I am already behind. But I can make that up. I had part of a toe amputated last week. But I can ride indoors all the same.

Last edited by zjrog; 12-07-19 at 09:04 PM.
zjrog is offline  
Old 12-07-19, 12:51 PM
  #27  
downtube42
Senior Member
 
downtube42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 2,041

Bikes: Volae Team, '74ish Windsor Carrera Sport, Priority Eight, Nimbus MUni, Trek Roscoe 6

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 109 Post(s)
Liked 89 Times in 56 Posts
Years ago I taught knot tying to boy scouts. They thought I was a knot expert, but in reality I was just one knot ahead of them.

Likewise, to ride with your daughter, you don't need to be any more than one day ahead of her.

Consider that success, and take it as far as you can and want beyond that.
downtube42 is offline  
Likes For downtube42:
Old 12-08-19, 06:15 AM
  #28  
TinyBear
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
TinyBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 113

Bikes: Giant Boulder SE, Giant Seek1

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 3 Posts
I have goals. My ultimate fitness goal is. I’d like to get to 200lbs. I’d like to be able to manage a 10km ride 5 days a week and longer weekend trail rides, without needing my Cain again the next day. I also want to get off all meds for my diabetes. But most of all I want to be better physically able to keep up with my 3YO Daughter and the next baby that’s on the way.

My issue is getting there. Before when I started this journey I was Fat and had zero cardio. BUT I was strong and could max out any of the gyms leg press machines. So back then it was a matter of 6 months on a exercise bike to build a bit of cardio and then buying and starting riding a bit further every day. Along with a diet change. Over course of three years I dropped nearly 100lbs. Today my cardio is week and body is battered and week so I still learning how to deal with both.

But am stubborn though. And refuse to just give up. Docs say I have more ability and flexibility than was projected and I’m determined to have more strength than projected as well.

I have been on the exercise bike 5 days a week after work. Between 15-30 mins. Level 1 or 3 respectively. The few days were the roads were clear of ice and snow I actually got out on the real bike for about 3kms (felt good but god I hate hills). I feel I just need to keep this going and not get too ambitious, just take it slow.

One mistake I commonly make that I’m trying to not repeat is letting my stubbornness push me too far. Last couple years I’d push to meet a time or difficulty goal. I could feel it being too much and push on anyways. Usually setting me back further. During early recovery I was really bad for that and often would push and cause swelling to the point of skin splitting (for work reasons I actually got rid of all my white socks so no one would see the blood and have me sent home, as I could not afford any more time off I only just barely kept my house).
TinyBear is offline  
Old 12-08-19, 06:39 AM
  #29  
TinyBear
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
TinyBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 113

Bikes: Giant Boulder SE, Giant Seek1

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 3 Posts
The complete list lf injuries resulting from my accident is long.

My left leg was almost completely severed above the ankle (had 2” of tissue and ligaments remaining). There was not enuff tissue to close the wound so I was sent home with packing and home care nursing for months until ultimately the 3rd surgeon was able to close it (of course in a few more months infection set in and my leg quite literally exploded (looked like a crime scene). I was then rushed to surgery to remove the metal as it harbours the dangerous infection. After a month of anti biotics being pumped into my heart I was brought back in for surgery #5 . My leg was re broken And metal put back in.

Additionally My right leg was also cut wide open and suffered some nerve damage. My left shoulder was dislocated for the 2nd time and I had a major concussion with some minor memory loss. And of course sprains and deep tissue bruising every were. I also had some road rash to contend with but honestly that was not all that bad in grand scream of things.

Today my shoulder and left leg bother me most of all. With my shoulder mostly being trouble some for sleeping and certain times lifting. My leg is a bit week, my left ankle can’t turn in or out more than couple degrees. My lower leg is very narrowed with a section of the inner leg missing (lol kinda looks like something took a bite out of my leg). This causes the tendons to be pressed togeather causing pain and swelling daily. More I do more it swells. I also have arthritis in my knee that’s advancing but is still manageable. And lastly the left legs an inch shorter than the right resulting in my shifting my hip to compensate.

Overall im very lucky and can manage most day to day stuff mostly unnoticed. The few limitations I have is obviously I’m a bit weaker and a bit slower. I can not kneel on my left and crouching down is painfull. Running is also awkward and much much slower.
TinyBear is offline  
Old 12-08-19, 08:52 AM
  #30  
berner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bristol, R. I.
Posts: 3,716

Bikes: Specialized Secteur, old Peugeot

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 408 Post(s)
Liked 130 Times in 92 Posts
As Tom pointed out in post #3 , you already have shown a measure of success. I can add that just being a survivor of a horrific accident puts you in the success camp. As one who spent considerable time and effort in my attempt to quit smoking, my eventual success was due to shear persistence. No matter how many times I failed, I stayed with it.

On losing weight, you are on the right road and should be glad of that accomplishment. I've been cutting out sugar from my diet wherever it can be found and this has made a difference in getting rid of inches off the middle. The tricky part is that sugar is added to everything that comes in a package. Shop the perimeter of food stores where the real food is. The stocked shelves have noting good.
berner is offline  
Old 12-08-19, 02:52 PM
  #31  
TinyBear
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
TinyBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 113

Bikes: Giant Boulder SE, Giant Seek1

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 3 Posts
This may seem like a dumb question but what’s a trainer? How does it differ from an exercise bike? Other than using your normal bicycle? What’s the benefit to it again over a exercise bike?

I have a decent exercise bike I use daily. My real bicycles remain in the garage for the nicer weather.

And lastly thank you all for advice and words of encouragement.
TinyBear is offline  
Old 12-09-19, 03:25 AM
  #32  
zjrog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,367

Bikes: 1986 KHS Fiero, 1989 Trek 950, 1990 Trek 7000, 1992 Trek 1400, 1998 Cannondale R200, 2010 Performance Access XCL9R

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 179 Post(s)
Liked 112 Times in 84 Posts

Yes. A regular bike on an indoor trainer stand. They come in several styles. Magnetic trainers, fluid trainers and now smart trainers. Magnetic, most are adjustable for resistance. About the cheapest you can go. Fluid trainers, use a viscous fluid that provides a non-linear but predictable resistance to your speed. Smart trainers are available in several styles now. Wheel on and wheel off. Wheel on, is like mine above. It is a Kurt Kinetic fluid trainer, originally just a "dumb" trainer. Kurt Kinetic has an add on iNride sensor that estimates power output. This useful on it's own in the app or, for use in the online world of Zwift, Rouvy and others. But, it's not a full smart trainer, as the apps available, can control resistance of the smarter trainers in response to hills. Wahoo makes a good wheel on smart trainer, as do others. Next up, in price as well as efficiency, are the wheel off trainers. As the name suggests, you pull the wheel off, and the trainer has gearing on it.

Are these better than a good indoor exercise bike? A lot depends on the bike. Is your exercise bike for spin classes and acts like a fixed gear bike? Or does the flywheel spin free if you stop pedaling? The advantage to using your bicycle, is it is fit to you already. But none of them are any good if they aren't used.

In my case, I have a bike dedicated to the trainer. I crashed on this bike, breaking my back 8 years ago. I have a mental block about riding it outdoors. So it is my dedicated trainer bike. To this, I have a way to hold my laptop where I can use it, and have an HDMI cable to a tv for Zwift or Rouvy. The iNride sensor is ANT+, so I have an ANT+ USB dongle on the floor by the trainer and a USB extension cord to the laptop. My bikes all have speed and cadence sensors, and I use a heart rate monitor chest belt. These all connect to the laptop as well. It makes it easy to see the days I'm not doing as well, or days that I am doing very well. Zwift is a bit more of a social environment, Rouvy has real world video of thousands of locations worlwide... Both are good ways to bide the time on the trainer and sort of feel like you are going somewhere. Just make sure to grab a towel and at least one good fan.

I have 2 other roadbikes, and my fit is nearly identical between the 3. My 29er MTB has drop bars, and I've come close to a matching fit to my other bikes. I do drop the seat almost 2 inches when trail riding the 29er. Riding the 4 bikes, the only significant difference are in bike weight and available gearing.
zjrog is offline  
Old 12-09-19, 10:32 AM
  #33  
TinyBear
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
TinyBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 113

Bikes: Giant Boulder SE, Giant Seek1

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by zjrog View Post

Yes. A regular bike on an indoor trainer stand. They come in several styles. Magnetic trainers, fluid trainers and now smart trainers. Magnetic, most are adjustable for resistance. About the cheapest you can go. Fluid trainers, use a viscous fluid that provides a non-linear but predictable resistance to your speed. Smart trainers are available in several styles now. Wheel on and wheel off. Wheel on, is like mine above. It is a Kurt Kinetic fluid trainer, originally just a "dumb" trainer. Kurt Kinetic has an add on iNride sensor that estimates power output. This useful on it's own in the app or, for use in the online world of Zwift, Rouvy and others. But, it's not a full smart trainer, as the apps available, can control resistance of the smarter trainers in response to hills. Wahoo makes a good wheel on smart trainer, as do others. Next up, in price as well as efficiency, are the wheel off trainers. As the name suggests, you pull the wheel off, and the trainer has gearing on it.

Are these better than a good indoor exercise bike? A lot depends on the bike. Is your exercise bike for spin classes and acts like a fixed gear bike? Or does the flywheel spin free if you stop pedaling? The advantage to using your bicycle, is it is fit to you already. But none of them are any good if they aren't used.

In my case, I have a bike dedicated to the trainer. I crashed on this bike, breaking my back 8 years ago. I have a mental block about riding it outdoors. So it is my dedicated trainer bike. To this, I have a way to hold my laptop where I can use it, and have an HDMI cable to a tv for Zwift or Rouvy. The iNride sensor is ANT+, so I have an ANT+ USB dongle on the floor by the trainer and a USB extension cord to the laptop. My bikes all have speed and cadence sensors, and I use a heart rate monitor chest belt. These all connect to the laptop as well. It makes it easy to see the days I'm not doing as well, or days that I am doing very well. Zwift is a bit more of a social environment, Rouvy has real world video of thousands of locations worlwide... Both are good ways to bide the time on the trainer and sort of feel like you are going somewhere. Just make sure to grab a towel and at least one good fan.

I have 2 other roadbikes, and my fit is nearly identical between the 3. My 29er MTB has drop bars, and I've come close to a matching fit to my other bikes. I do drop the seat almost 2 inches when trail riding the 29er. Riding the 4 bikes, the only significant difference are in bike weight and available gearing.
Oh ok. No my stationary bike has no free wheel. But it does have electronic adjustments and a computer to simulate hills and such and a basic computer with estimated calories burned ,distance ridden, and heart rate (taken from your hands on the grips.
TinyBear is offline  
Old 12-09-19, 11:48 AM
  #34  
zjrog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,367

Bikes: 1986 KHS Fiero, 1989 Trek 950, 1990 Trek 7000, 1992 Trek 1400, 1998 Cannondale R200, 2010 Performance Access XCL9R

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 179 Post(s)
Liked 112 Times in 84 Posts
Originally Posted by TinyBear View Post
Oh ok. No my stationary bike has no free wheel. But it does have electronic adjustments and a computer to simulate hills and such and a basic computer with estimated calories burned ,distance ridden, and heart rate (taken from your hands on the grips.
I sat in on a spin class recently, and the lack of freewheel was tough on my ankle. I'm facing either replacement or fusion in the next year or so. Obviously, this rules out getting a fixed gear bike as well.

Having the heart rate at the handlebars is good, but when I was in cardiac rehab gym, I was told they are not as accurate as true HRM. I use the Wahoo Tickr. But the TickrX offers a lot more for other exercise. The fun part, if you will, is having one app that lets you see the pertinent basic info. Speed, cadence HR. On the trainer it adds power...

The above is from my phone...


This is off my laptop.

It is possible to overthink the numbers and there are more metrics available. I also track my weight and BP. I never had a heart attack, but was on my way to one. At my heaviest, my resting HR was 100+. Now, I'm back in the 58 to 65 range.
zjrog is offline  
Old 12-09-19, 05:13 PM
  #35  
cyclist2000
Senior Member
 
cyclist2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Up
Posts: 3,893

Bikes: Masi, Giant TCR, Eisentraut, Jamis Aurora Elite, Zullo (trainer bike), Cannondale, 84 Stumpjumper, 2 Waterfords, Tern D8, Bianchi, Gunner Roadie, looking for a Ti frame and Brompton M6R

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 156 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 41 Times in 35 Posts
Originally Posted by TinyBear View Post
Also one more slightly different question due to the accident and resulting 5 surgeries. My left leg is a full 1 shorter than my right leg (height difference is knee down) Normal day to day stuff I can adapt for this but wonder if for cycling this could cause issues. I keep meaning to go to a orthotics doc to get special insoles but never got round to it as I walk almost without a limp most days.

Just a thought but you may try a shorter crank arm on the left side, I don't know if that would work or not.
cyclist2000 is offline  
Old 12-09-19, 05:46 PM
  #36  
cyclist2000
Senior Member
 
cyclist2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Up
Posts: 3,893

Bikes: Masi, Giant TCR, Eisentraut, Jamis Aurora Elite, Zullo (trainer bike), Cannondale, 84 Stumpjumper, 2 Waterfords, Tern D8, Bianchi, Gunner Roadie, looking for a Ti frame and Brompton M6R

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 156 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 41 Times in 35 Posts
I have a few goals to keep me motivated

1) I ride for my health, I see a significant difference in my blood sugars when i ride at least 25 miles a day.
2) I normally do an annual week long tour, in order to be in good riding shape I ride daily when i have a bike at my disposal
3) I have a rule that if I go through the effort to go out for a ride, I ride for at least 20 of miles, no excuses (except for lightning)

if your going to watch TV, spend some time on the exercise bike while watching. I am typing this while riding on my trainer.
cyclist2000 is offline  
Likes For cyclist2000:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.