Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Electronics, Lighting, & Gadgets
Reload this Page >

3D Printed Accessories / Mounts

Notices
Electronics, Lighting, & Gadgets HRM, GPS, MP3, HID. Whether it's got an acronym or not, here's where you'll find discussions on all sorts of tools, toys and gadgets.

3D Printed Accessories / Mounts

Old 02-28-20, 12:57 AM
  #551  
Benzon
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by WheresWaldo View Post
As far as I know the only Madone models that are physically different are the SL vs. SLR and how they mount the rear reflector. For my adapters, I use the actual Trek reflector mount and replace the movable arm with a Varia mount.
Hi WheresWaldo, thanks for the response. Would there be a possibility to buy one from you?
Benzon is offline  
Old 02-28-20, 06:33 AM
  #552  
WheresWaldo
Ride it like you stole it
Thread Starter
 
WheresWaldo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Union County, NC
Posts: 4,888

Bikes: 2013 Cannondale EVO Ultegra Di2, Pedal Force Aeroblade, Rue Tandem

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 81 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Benzon Go to this link and take a look, I have Varia Adapters for both the SL and SLR Madone reflector mounts, https://www.shapeways.com/shops/revolutionaries

I don't sell anything directly, I just design and then put them on Shapeways site and they Sell, Print, then Ship it to you. I don't work for Shapeways, but get a small percentage of each sale of my designs.
__________________
"Never use your face as a brake pad" - Jake Watson
The Reloutionaries @ Shapeways
WheresWaldo is offline  
Old 02-29-20, 04:49 AM
  #553  
WheresWaldo
Ride it like you stole it
Thread Starter
 
WheresWaldo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Union County, NC
Posts: 4,888

Bikes: 2013 Cannondale EVO Ultegra Di2, Pedal Force Aeroblade, Rue Tandem

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 81 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I finally have mounts that are profile specific for Specialized SL and Pave 'D' seat posts. These are the posts used on both the Roubaix and Tarmac bicycles.
Here is the Varia mount, http://shpws.me/RM5t
__________________
"Never use your face as a brake pad" - Jake Watson
The Reloutionaries @ Shapeways
WheresWaldo is offline  
Old 03-09-20, 09:15 AM
  #554  
doubravsky 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Riverside, CA
Posts: 93

Bikes: Colnago Crystal, GT MTB, Fuji D6 TT bike, Breezer Beltway commuter

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
Iím looking for a garmin mount to attach to a spare battery. Iíve got a mount on my aero bars and on the battery. On the top Iíd like another mount so my garmin could go above it. Hereís a pic of the bars:



This is the aero bars with the first mount


what I was hoping to do was attach a mount to the top. Tried super glue- popped off gravel riding. Tried JB weld... no luck. Thereís (I think) not enough surface area on then mount for a secure bind. Hereís the mount and the battery:







is anyone aware of a mount like this I could order? What would be best I think is a solid flat surface on the bottom to make a solid attachment. Any thoughts?
doubravsky is offline  
Old 03-09-20, 11:57 AM
  #555  
ChrisAlbertson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Southern California
Posts: 146

Bikes: 70's frame, newer parts

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 32 Times in 23 Posts
Originally Posted by doubravsky View Post
Iím looking for a garmin mount to attach to a spare battery...
What would be best I think is a solid flat surface on the bottom to make a solid attachment. Any thoughts?
So the problem is that the mont does not stick to the battery? Why not design a loop of plastic that fully goes around the battery. Make it in two parts with screws (1) a bottom that has the Garmin mount and then a cover that screws on and the battery. I think you have foud that glue is not the way to attach the battery to the plastic mount.

Even better but, more work is to disassemble the battery and drill and tap holes on the case. Then design the mount with matching holes and counterbores for the hex head screws.

Zip ties could work too. Make a try that holds the battery and has a Garmin mount and put some slots in the tray for zip ties.

Of these, the screws would look the best but zip ties are the easiest.
ChrisAlbertson is offline  
Old 03-09-20, 02:47 PM
  #556  
doubravsky 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Riverside, CA
Posts: 93

Bikes: Colnago Crystal, GT MTB, Fuji D6 TT bike, Breezer Beltway commuter

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
Makes sense... thanks for the info! Looks like zip ties will work.....
doubravsky is offline  
Old 03-13-20, 09:48 PM
  #557  
ChrisAlbertson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Southern California
Posts: 146

Bikes: 70's frame, newer parts

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 32 Times in 23 Posts
Originally Posted by keyven View Post
I'm really interested in getting into 3D printing and printing bike mounting systems seem like a great place to start. Is there any sub-$1,000 3D printers that can do a decent job of this?
Absolutely. You can do wel with a $200 budget. $1000 does not get you much better results but does but much better customer service and support.

These are popular and work very well https://www.amazon.com/Printer-Deskt.../dp/B07B3RN6NG

What you also need is to kinds of software
(1) 3D Modeling or "CAD" Software so you can design parts. Here is a learning curve but in a few weeks you are up to speed and
(2) slicer software to convert the above design to the kind of file a printer needs.

I use Autodesk's Fusion360 for design work. It is free for hobby users and even commercial use if you company is making less then $100K/year. Fusion360 is completely professional quality. You could use it to design things like car or bike parts, power tools or whatever. For a slicer, I like "Cura" and Cura works well with my Anet A6 printer.

Do not hold off on getting a printer because of the cost. The cheap ones work then if you like you can upgrade the printers. The parts are standardized about like bike parts are with a few different "standards but many companies make the parts and they mostly interchange. The A8 is a "Prussia clone" and mostly can use Prussia-like parts so there is no vendor lock-in

$200 is actually a good enough working budget and you can make real parts. You will need to learn to tweek and adjust and experiment with temperatures and feed rates and what is the best way to get the plastic to slick to the built plat. It is not like a laser printer that you just plug-in and it works. These is a longer learning curve with 3D printers. People pay that $1000 to shorten the curve I'd not do that. Best to beat you head on the wall and learn how stuff works.

If you have the mechanical skills to build a bike or overhaul a bottom bracket you can work with a $200 printer. But if you are the guy who has the LBS fix flat tires for you you need the $2000 printer

Last edited by ChrisAlbertson; 03-13-20 at 10:49 PM.
ChrisAlbertson is offline  
Likes For ChrisAlbertson:
Old 03-17-20, 05:40 AM
  #558  
WheresWaldo
Ride it like you stole it
Thread Starter
 
WheresWaldo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Union County, NC
Posts: 4,888

Bikes: 2013 Cannondale EVO Ultegra Di2, Pedal Force Aeroblade, Rue Tandem

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 81 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
To add to what @ChrisAlbertson has already said there are a lot of printers in the $200 range that are very good machine. The Creality ENDER line is a well regarded printer as well as are the Anet's. The key though it patience, because a 3D printer is not a plug and play type of device. You will seem to forever tinker with it to bet the best prints possible out of it. Then there is the learning about CAD software and Slicing software and types of filament, etc.

Cad is generally classified by the knowledge set you already have and also whether it is free or comes with a real cost. I focus on the free ones, personally.

If you want a browser type of CAD (no need to install on your PC or Mac) there are products like Tinkercad (this does require you to have an online account with AutoDesk which is free). It is one of the most popular educational CAD tools and one of the best for beginners to use. Its interface is friendly and easy-to-use. Tinkercad is ideal for 3D printing because it saves objects as STL files and offers solid or box modeling parameters for 3D printing geometries. Another great feature is that it’s completely web-based, so no downloads are required.

Then another free CAD program is SketchUp. It is one of the most intuitive and powerful free CAD tools available on the market. The combination makes it ideal for beginners and intermediate users. The platform is also completely compatible with the needs of anyone looking to 3D print. SketchUp boasts a 3D Warehouse, which has lots of pre-made models, including ones made for 3D printing.

Fusion360 from Autodesk has already been mentioned and is also the same CAD software I use.

All of the above products are proprietary and their licensing models could change in the future.

Now a short list of the really free as in Open Source Software (OSS)

Probably the best of the OSS software is FreeCAD. FreeCAD is a free, open-source parametric CAD software modeler. It’s considered to be a great entry point for designers and mechanical engineers new to the modeling world. Parametric modeling means that one can modify a 3D model by browsing the model history and adjust or change individual elements (this is how Fusion360 modeling is based). The graphical user interface may not look as polished as its competitors, but FreeCAD is ideal for precision design, which is good for technical and replacement parts.

If you are mathematically inclined there is OpenSCAD. In OpenSCAD you are basically defining your models with mathematical equations rather than primitive shapes. It is more akin to programming than modeling. It is a script-only based modeller that uses its own description language; parts can be previewed, but it cannot be interactively selected or modified by mouse in the 3D view. An OpenSCAD script specifies geometric primitives (such as spheres, boxes, cylinders, etc.) and defines how they are modified and combined (for instance by intersection, difference, envelope combination and Minkowski sums) to render a 3D model. As such, the program does constructive solid geometry (CSG). OpenSCAD is available for Windows, Linux and OS X.

If you are a Right Brained person and into more artistic expression or organic shapes, there are a lot of people modeling with Blender. For many, Blender is the epitome of 3D computer graphics software, not necessarily because it’s the best but because it’s free, open-source, and has a plethora of features and use cases. Examples include 3D modeling, texturing, rigging, skinning, smoke simulation, particle simulation, animation, rendering, and video editing. Naturally, Blender is more than capable of producing models for 3D printing. That said, unless you’re keen on diving deep into the platform, you might want to consider a different tool. Blender is considered to be a difficult tool to master, and the many features can make it both intimidating and confusing.

Just some closing thought; If you get a 3D printer, visit the communities that support whatever printer it is, ask a lot of questions, watch YouTube videos about the printer. Learn about the different types of filaments (ABS, PLA, PET as examples). Pick a CAD software and stick with it. You can also go to file repositories such as Thingiverse to see, download and print thousands of models designed by other people like yourself. That is exactly how I started my journey.

One more thing, printing with these consumer grade printers for parts to fit on your bicycle can be challenging. so make sure you learn the ins and outs of your printer very well, 3D printing is the easy part, but getting a 3D print to be precisely the size you want is what is hard.
__________________
"Never use your face as a brake pad" - Jake Watson
The Reloutionaries @ Shapeways

Last edited by WheresWaldo; 03-17-20 at 05:47 AM.
WheresWaldo is offline  
Old 03-25-20, 02:13 PM
  #559  
SethAZ
Senior Member
 
SethAZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,087

Bikes: 2018 Lynskey R260, 2005 Diamondback 29er, 2003 Trek 2300

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 442 Post(s)
Liked 78 Times in 52 Posts
Originally Posted by kshepherd View Post
So here are the pictures of the GoPro -> Garmin Mount adapter I 3d printed so that I could mount my 360 camera to my bike.

First up, this is the adapter I 3D printed:

Hi all. I just wanted to point out that for designs like this one shown above, this is going to be a very fragile part. This was printed on an FDM printer, so the layers are built up with the plane of each layer perpendicular to those vertical surfaces where the GoPro mount would actually slot in. Notice the 90-degree corners at the base of each of those slots? Those are heavy stress risers, and are where the focus of any sideways force acting on the mount will want to crack the mount off at an orientation of the layers that makes this most likely.

A good way to handle things like this is to put very generous chamfers or fillets anywhere two planar surfaces meet in your design. Since the mount part that's fixed to the camera doesn't extend to the bottom of the spaces in between the mount as shown above, there's going to be room to put generous fillets there. PLA can be very brittle, and with 90-degree joints between planes, and especially with one of those planes also being the plane each layer is built up on, designs like this look like they work fine until they get bumped sideways and just snap off. A good fillet can make that much harder to happen. Machining metal is much easier without fillets, but a 3D printer doesn't care one way or the other, so there's no reason not to include them in any design. A 3D-printed part designed for maximum toughness will be much more "organic-looking" than what one would want to machine out of metal, simply because printing these organically blended surfaces costs nothing in terms of printing complexity.
SethAZ is offline  
Old 03-25-20, 11:15 PM
  #560  
tomtomtom123
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 791
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 248 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 81 Times in 55 Posts
Originally Posted by SethAZ View Post
Hi all. I just wanted to point out that for designs like this one shown above, this is going to be a very fragile part. This was printed on an FDM printer, so the layers are built up with the plane of each layer perpendicular to those vertical surfaces where the GoPro mount would actually slot in. Notice the 90-degree corners at the base of each of those slots? Those are heavy stress risers, and are where the focus of any sideways force acting on the mount will want to crack the mount off at an orientation of the layers that makes this most likely.

A good way to handle things like this is to put very generous chamfers or fillets anywhere two planar surfaces meet in your design. Since the mount part that's fixed to the camera doesn't extend to the bottom of the spaces in between the mount as shown above, there's going to be room to put generous fillets there. PLA can be very brittle, and with 90-degree joints between planes, and especially with one of those planes also being the plane each layer is built up on, designs like this look like they work fine until they get bumped sideways and just snap off. A good fillet can make that much harder to happen. Machining metal is much easier without fillets, but a 3D printer doesn't care one way or the other, so there's no reason not to include them in any design. A 3D-printed part designed for maximum toughness will be much more "organic-looking" than what one would want to machine out of metal, simply because printing these organically blended surfaces costs nothing in terms of printing complexity.
If you print it with the fins on the XY axis instead of what appears to be the Z axis in the photo, it will be slightly stronger, but still brittle with an FDM printer. If you printed it with SLS Nylon, it will be very strong, but also turning the fins to the XY axis will make it slightly stronger, as SLS nylon also has a slightly weaker Z-axis. And yes, fillets or chamfers on the corners will help.
tomtomtom123 is offline  
Old 03-26-20, 10:56 AM
  #561  
SethAZ
Senior Member
 
SethAZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,087

Bikes: 2018 Lynskey R260, 2005 Diamondback 29er, 2003 Trek 2300

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 442 Post(s)
Liked 78 Times in 52 Posts
Originally Posted by tomtomtom123 View Post
If you print it with the fins on the XY axis instead of what appears to be the Z axis in the photo, it will be slightly stronger, but still brittle with an FDM printer. If you printed it with SLS Nylon, it will be very strong, but also turning the fins to the XY axis will make it slightly stronger, as SLS nylon also has a slightly weaker Z-axis. And yes, fillets or chamfers on the corners will help.
I hear ya. My 3D printing experience is only with FDM, no SLS yet. I'm thinking about getting one of the really cheap new liquid resin printers though, to broaden my horizons. I think the liquid resin prints would be too fragile for functional parts like this, but it would be useful for figurines and other decorative stuff. I've printed some nylon on my printer before, and I'd 100% agree that it would be a better choice for parts like these mounts than PLA is.

I'm all good for mounts on my bike right now, but I've been thinking about trying to whip up a design for a better mount for my Niteryder light and Garmin. With my saddlebag under my seat I'm limited on mounting stuff to the seatpost, but my Brooks saddle has loops for hanging stuff from the back of the seat that I might tap into.

Rotating the print as you suggested would definitely lessen the fragility due to layer delamination across the thin cross sections of those mount flanges, but also would come with its own annoyances, like requiring support for them, since the flanges would start above the print bed. I think with a more durable filament that delaminates less like PETG or Nylon and some generous fillets the current print orientation would be fine.

I'd never use PLA for anything designed to hold parts onto a bike. I consider it way too fragile for something like that. I use PLA for figurines and decorative stuff like that, but any functional part I print I use PETG on. I've printed some stuff in ASA, which is designed to be UV-resistant for use on stuff that'll be outdoors.

Last edited by SethAZ; 03-26-20 at 08:16 PM.
SethAZ is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
edthesped
Electronics, Lighting, & Gadgets
8
12-07-17 08:33 AM
WheresWaldo
Electronics, Lighting, & Gadgets
2
12-10-15 10:41 PM
Buffalo Buff
Electronics, Lighting, & Gadgets
5
03-02-15 02:02 PM
rjc100
Electronics, Lighting, & Gadgets
0
01-17-10 03:06 PM
Cosmoline
Electronics, Lighting, & Gadgets
5
01-12-10 07:10 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.