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Can A Gravel Bike Be A Good Road Bike?

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Can A Gravel Bike Be A Good Road Bike?

Old 09-21-19, 06:17 PM
  #176  
Seattle Forrest
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Originally Posted by RiceAWay View Post
... but neither do I need someone other than my two brothers and my wife insulting me.
This made me laugh.
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Old 09-21-19, 07:21 PM
  #177  
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Originally Posted by RiceAWay View Post
A gravel bike is nothing more than a road bike with sufficient tire clearance for up to 32 or so gravel knobbys.
Clearance up to 32mm isn't at all the common max for what size gravel bikes take.

It's super neat that you ride gravel on 23mm or narrower tires. Just recognize that many others choose to use a different size tire for what are obvious reasons.

Me personally- a 23mm or narrower tire would not be fun to ride on gravel around me. I would deflect and bounce around more than what i do with a wider tire. I would absorb more vibration than what i do with a wider tire.
There is simply no upside to riding gravel with a 23mm or smaller tire, so bragging about how it was done without thought is funny.

Ultimately, what constitutes comfort for each rider is different. And what constitutes gravel for each region of the country is different. Some may find a 23mm tire at 120psi works for them in a certain area. Others may find a 40mm tire at 40psi works for them in a certain area.
Its bold to claim someone is 'doing it wrong'.
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Old 09-21-19, 07:35 PM
  #178  
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Originally Posted by RiceAWay View Post
Maybe you can explain to me what difference you believe there is between a CX and a road bike?
In general, a CX bike will have:

More stack
Longer wheelbase
Room for larger tires
Higher bottom bracket
No mounts beyond cage bosses
Lower standover height

...but it will still have two wheels, pedals in the middle, and all of the other bike bits, so it's mostly the same.
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Old 09-23-19, 07:20 AM
  #179  
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Interesting data point for me. Did a solo century on Saturday, same route I did about six months ago. First time out was on my aero road bike, this time was on the gravel bike with road tires. On most of my usual routes and group rides, I haven't noticed much difference between the two bikes. But riding solo for 100 miles, there is no doubt that the gravel bike is slower. Probably mostly due to rider position, then to a lesser extent, frame and gearing. But I was about 10 mins slower, and the kicker is that when I did it on the aero bike it stormed hard for the last 30 miles, so that slowed me down even more (weather was clear and perfect this past weekend). Not a big deal to me, just interesting to see the difference is much more apparent over a longer distance, which makes sense.

It'll be interesting to see how it goes when I do that route again with the new Tarmac.
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Old 09-23-19, 07:57 AM
  #180  
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Originally Posted by Rides4Beer View Post
Interesting data point for me. Did a solo century on Saturday, same route I did about six months ago. First time out was on my aero road bike, this time was on the gravel bike with road tires. On most of my usual routes and group rides, I haven't noticed much difference between the two bikes. But riding solo for 100 miles, there is no doubt that the gravel bike is slower. Probably mostly due to rider position, then to a lesser extent, frame and gearing. But I was about 10 mins slower, and the kicker is that when I did it on the aero bike it stormed hard for the last 30 miles, so that slowed me down even more (weather was clear and perfect this past weekend). Not a big deal to me, just interesting to see the difference is much more apparent over a longer distance, which makes sense.

It'll be interesting to see how it goes when I do that route again with the new Tarmac.
Not saying one is slower than the other but I've done a routine 40 mile route about 150 times. My moving times can be +-5 or more minutes and average speed +- 0.5 mph on any given day on the same bike.

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Old 09-23-19, 08:25 AM
  #181  
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Is a "gravel bike" just a more sturdily built CX bike with relaxed geometry and big tires? If so sure it can be a good road bike but it will likely be heavier and more difficult to get really aero so I think that some tradeoffs are inevitable compared with road bikes.
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Old 09-23-19, 09:04 AM
  #182  
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Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
Is a "gravel bike" just a more sturdily built CX bike with relaxed geometry and big tires? If so sure it can be a good road bike but it will likely be heavier and more difficult to get really aero so I think that some tradeoffs are inevitable compared with road bikes.
Some of the frames are a bit heavier than a typical road bike, but we're not talking about a huge difference. Once slicks are subbed for the knobbies they're, for the most part, endurance road bikes. Could a racing-oriented frame be set up more aero? Quite often, sure, but the rider also has to be able to take advantage of that more aggressive set-up, which is far from a given. So, can they be good road bikes? Undoubtedly. Can they be good crit bikes? No, they wouldn't be ideal.
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Old 09-23-19, 09:30 AM
  #183  
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Originally Posted by u235 View Post
Not saying one is slower than the other but I've done a routine 40 mile route about 150 times. My moving times can be +-5 or more minutes and average speed +- 0.5 mph on any given day on the same bike.
No doubt, always variables at play. I was surprised tho, I fully expected to be faster on Sat, given that my fitness has improved, and the weather was better (warmer, but that storm def slowed me down the last 30 miles of my previous ride).
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Old 09-23-19, 10:26 AM
  #184  
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Originally Posted by Rides4Beer View Post
Interesting data point for me. Did a solo century on Saturday, same route I did about six months ago. First time out was on my aero road bike, this time was on the gravel bike with road tires. On most of my usual routes and group rides, I haven't noticed much difference between the two bikes. But riding solo for 100 miles, there is no doubt that the gravel bike is slower. Probably mostly due to rider position, then to a lesser extent, frame and gearing. But I was about 10 mins slower, and the kicker is that when I did it on the aero bike it stormed hard for the last 30 miles, so that slowed me down even more (weather was clear and perfect this past weekend). Not a big deal to me, just interesting to see the difference is much more apparent over a longer distance, which makes sense.
The aero road bike certainly should be quicker, but 10 minutes on a century is only about a 3% difference. There are a lot of factors that could be responsible for that.
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Old 09-23-19, 12:38 PM
  #185  
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Originally Posted by Dirt Farmer View Post
Wait, there's gravel in Manhattan??

You learn something new every day!
The gravel IN Manhattan (the Bridle Path in Central Park) is reserved for runners and horses, but there's gravel CLOSE to Manhattan. The Old Croton Aqueduct Trail is wonderful and starts in the North Bronx. And it's easy to get to miles and miles of gravel (dirt) roads if you take MetroNorth to places like Cold Spring, Katona, etc. I also do rides that are mostly paved but with significant gravel sections – say up by Nyack.

Originally Posted by billyymc View Post
So back to the original post. Like most questions here that get asked in BF, the best answer is "it depends."

Whether a gravel bike will perform well as a road bike for you depends on what you want out of a road bike. From what the OP said (assuming he's still here after six pages of typical BF arguing), a gravel bike with a second wheelset seems like a very good option for him. The caveat being I don't know what his group rides are like. If he's struggling to keep up on group rides with an "actual" road bike, perhaps swapping to a gravel bike with road-oriented tires would put him off the pace. Perhaps. And perhaps not.
As I mentioned above, I bought a Fuji Jari 1.3 almost a year ago now. And this spring I got a 650B wheelset for it. I put 700C x 28s on when it's a paved route or mostly paved with some "polite" gravel (e.g. hard pack cinders), and I put 650B x 47s on when it's rougher or I just want a plusher ride that day and speed isn't an issue. On group rides people notice that it's a gravel bike when I have the 47s on. But it passes for a road bike when I have the 28s on. The only comments I get are along the lines of "Did you buy another bike? I thought your bike was a gravel bike…"

Originally Posted by pinsonp2 View Post
Depending on how fast you ride the road, the front chainrings on these bikes (48/32 or 46/30) as opposed to the standard compact (50/34) on a road may not be satisfactory. You may 'spin out' from time to time.
The lower gearing of my bike suits me. Honestly spinning out hasn't been a problem. I get close to it sometimes, but I'm not really a speed freak and I'm usually thinking about how to slow down in those moments.
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Old 09-23-19, 05:01 PM
  #186  
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Carbon frames exist for gravel because users find them to be a combination of the following-
- comfortable
- versatile
- light
- look good
- trendy
- innovative
Of that group of attributes the ONLY one that is legitimate is "Trendy".

Since the comfort on a gravel bike is almost entirely the tires (with minor part being the geometry) the frame material means nothing. Light? Who worries about that on a gravel bike - especially when heavier gravel bikes tend to ride better? In what universe does a carbon fiber bike look better than any other material? I hate to put it to you but carbon fiber has been around since 1989. That's likely to be your age so that means it ain't "innovative".
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Old 09-23-19, 05:32 PM
  #187  
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Originally Posted by RiceAWay View Post
Of that group of attributes the ONLY one that is legitimate is "Trendy".

Since the comfort on a gravel bike is almost entirely the tires (with minor part being the geometry) the frame material means nothing. Light? Who worries about that on a gravel bike - especially when heavier gravel bikes tend to ride better? In what universe does a carbon fiber bike look better than any other material? I hate to put it to you but carbon fiber has been around since 1989. That's likely to be your age so that means it ain't "innovative".
No, they are all legitimate if the user views them as legitimate.
I am unsure as to why you think your opinion is actually factual and correct. Those arent the same. You speak as if what you value and view is the one correct way- it isnt.

Many carbon gravel bike utilize various forms of suspension within the frame and components. Stems, seat tubes, seat stays- these can flex to absorb vibration and improve comfort.
You claim only tires provide comfort, but actual users of these frames may disagree.

As for weight, many people 'worry'(consider) about that on their gravel bike. Why wouldnt they? As for a heavier gravel bike riding better- define this. What is light and what is heavy? I dont know why a 28# gravel bike would ride 'better' than a 22# gravel bike based just on the weight since, you know, I and many others have actual experience on this issue.

With regards to aesthetics, once again you claim your opinion as the correct view when it is simply an opinion. Carbon gravel frames come in many shapes and a lot of people find them to look good. This is based on actual observation of posts in the gravel forum and isnt just my personal opinion(my gravel bikes have all been steel frame).

As to carbon fiber frames being around since '89, it was before that when main brands were selling carbon frame road bikes. Regardless, technology has changed since 30 years ago- obviously. Seen a car recently? Seen a computer recently? Carbon use in frames has changed in that time too.

Oh, and I'm older than 30, but man I wish I were still that age!
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Old 09-23-19, 06:57 PM
  #188  
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
No, they are all legitimate if the user views them as legitimate.
I am unsure as to why you think your opinion is actually factual and correct. Those arent the same. You speak as if what you value and view is the one correct way- it isnt.

Many carbon gravel bike utilize various forms of suspension within the frame and components. Stems, seat tubes, seat stays- these can flex to absorb vibration and improve comfort.
You claim only tires provide comfort, but actual users of these frames may disagree.

As for weight, many people 'worry'(consider) about that on their gravel bike. Why wouldnt they? As for a heavier gravel bike riding better- define this. What is light and what is heavy? I dont know why a 28# gravel bike would ride 'better' than a 22# gravel bike based just on the weight since, you know, I and many others have actual experience on this issue.

With regards to aesthetics, once again you claim your opinion as the correct view when it is simply an opinion. Carbon gravel frames come in many shapes and a lot of people find them to look good. This is based on actual observation of posts in the gravel forum and isnt just my personal opinion(my gravel bikes have all been steel frame).

As to carbon fiber frames being around since '89, it was before that when main brands were selling carbon frame road bikes. Regardless, technology has changed since 30 years ago- obviously. Seen a car recently? Seen a computer recently? Carbon use in frames has changed in that time too.

Oh, and I'm older than 30, but man I wish I were still that age!
I think that you need to slow your roll. Do you know who you're talking to? The man has a bag - nay! A LARGE bag - of Bontrager hats given to him by Kieth, himself. Show some respect!
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Old 09-23-19, 08:32 PM
  #189  
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
I think that you need to slow your roll. Do you know who you're talking to? The man has a bag - nay! A LARGE bag - of Bontrager hats given to him by Kieth, himself. Show some respect!
I wish someone would give me a large bag of Bontrager hats -- I could really use the bag.
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Old 09-23-19, 09:27 PM
  #190  
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Originally Posted by RiceAWay View Post
Of that group of attributes the ONLY one that is legitimate is "Trendy".

Since the comfort on a gravel bike is almost entirely the tires (with minor part being the geometry) the frame material means nothing. Light? Who worries about that on a gravel bike - especially when heavier gravel bikes tend to ride better? In what universe does a carbon fiber bike look better than any other material? I hate to put it to you but carbon fiber has been around since 1989. That's likely to be your age so that means it ain't "innovative".
Since I have to carry my bike up two flights of stairs every time I ride it, weight is important to me. Oh, and because mountain passes too.
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Old 09-26-19, 05:02 PM
  #191  
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
No, they are all legitimate if the user views them as legitimate.
I am unsure as to why you think your opinion is actually factual and correct. Those arent the same. You speak as if what you value and view is the one correct way- it isnt.

Many carbon gravel bike utilize various forms of suspension within the frame and components. Stems, seat tubes, seat stays- these can flex to absorb vibration and improve comfort.
You claim only tires provide comfort, but actual users of these frames may disagree.

As for weight, many people 'worry'(consider) about that on their gravel bike. Why wouldnt they? As for a heavier gravel bike riding better- define this. What is light and what is heavy? I dont know why a 28# gravel bike would ride 'better' than a 22# gravel bike based just on the weight since, you know, I and many others have actual experience on this issue.

With regards to aesthetics, once again you claim your opinion as the correct view when it is simply an opinion. Carbon gravel frames come in many shapes and a lot of people find them to look good. This is based on actual observation of posts in the gravel forum and isnt just my personal opinion(my gravel bikes have all been steel frame).

As to carbon fiber frames being around since '89, it was before that when main brands were selling carbon frame road bikes. Regardless, technology has changed since 30 years ago- obviously. Seen a car recently? Seen a computer recently? Carbon use in frames has changed in that time too.

Oh, and I'm older than 30, but man I wish I were still that age!
Well, in that case I believe aluminum frames are better because they have more colorful paint.
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Old 09-30-19, 08:39 AM
  #192  
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Originally Posted by RiceAWay View Post
I'm not sure what you're talking about. A gravel bike is nothing more than a road bike with sufficient tire clearance for up to 32 or so gravel knobbys. Most of the bikes before 1985 would do that. I can't say that I ever even used special tires to ride gravel roads and just went from asphalt to dirt road without even thinking about it. And that's when a wide tire was 23mm.

In general I'd agree.

I'd add that whereas I view disk/rim as a choice for road, gravel's really should be hydraulic disk. Mechanical disk should be outlawed because if you're going to do something...do it right.

I also went aluminum on my gravel vs. carbon with the thought that if used properly, it should have some smacks and dings over it's lifespan.
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Old 10-04-19, 08:44 PM
  #193  
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I didn't read the entire thread, so not sure if it has been mentioned already.

The answer to your question is yes, by that I mean you can get a 100% gravel bike and 90% of a road bike with a different set of wheels, all in one.

I recently bought the new Cervelo Aspero, I think you should check into that. It ticks all the boxes for both gravel and road with the only exception that it's a little heavier than a true road (climbing) bike.

I ended up building it as an Shimano 1x with 42t front and 11x42t rear, both my gravel wheelset (650b) and road (700c) run the same ratio cassette. In that setup as a road bike, I didn't missed much even when I was doing a pretty long climb and decent (12 miles) at 6% gradient on Blue Ridge Parkway. I guess it would be better if it's a bit lighter and I had bigger gears for the decent. Hence, I say it's 90% road bike.

On gravel, that thing flies, better than any I've had before, e.g. Santa Cruz Stigmata or Specialized Crux.
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Old 10-04-19, 08:46 PM
  #194  
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I don't think your "gravel" is the gravel people are talking about these days... the newer gravel bike can almost tackle nice single tracks. I don't think your pre-1985 bike would do that.
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Old 10-04-19, 09:08 PM
  #195  
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Originally Posted by dalava View Post
I didn't read the entire thread, so not sure if it has been mentioned already.

The answer to your question is yes, by that I mean you can get a 100% gravel bike and 90% of a road bike with a different set of wheels, all in one.

I recently bought the new Cervelo Aspero, I think you should check into that. It ticks all the boxes for both gravel and road with the only exception that it's a little heavier than a true road (climbing) bike.

I ended up building it as an Shimano 1x with 42t front and 11x42t rear, both my gravel wheelset (650b) and road (700c) run the same ratio cassette. In that setup as a road bike, I didn't missed much even when I was doing a pretty long climb and decent (12 miles) at 6% gradient on Blue Ridge Parkway. I guess it would be better if it's a bit lighter and I had bigger gears for the decent. Hence, I say it's 90% road bike.

On gravel, that thing flies, better than any I've had before, e.g. Santa Cruz Stigmata or Specialized Crux.
Oh man. I have a C3. If I could have a few more bikes, that would for sure be one of them. Since I can't, you sound lend me yours. 🤪
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