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Good old frames for commuter

Old 08-14-19, 10:30 AM
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iamacat
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Good old frames for commuter

What are some good classic frames for commuting? Specifically interested in being able to fit larger tires (~30mm, hopefully more) with fenders because that's just what I need to do here in rain+pothole country (Seattle). There are lots of 70s and 80s frames for sale but not sure what to look for that would be a good fit for commuting needs.

The Trek 520 with cantilever brakes seem great. Just hard to find in my size. Any more like this?

Thanks!
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Old 08-14-19, 10:48 AM
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you should be able to find a high quality frame in good shape for 150-200 bucks, I recommend the Japanese made frames, they are very high quality and will generally have fender eyelets (you live in Seattle, you understand) and they are usually ISO threading so you won't have fit issues.

Are you confident that you can evaluate a frame for damage before buying it ? What size are you looking for ?

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Old 08-14-19, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by mpetry912 View Post
you should be able to find a high quality frame in good shape for 150-200 bucks, I recommend the Japanese made frames, they are very high quality and will generally have fender eyelets (you live in Seattle, you understand) and they are usually ISO threading so you won't have fit issues.

Are you confident that you can evaluate a frame for damage before buying it ? What size are you looking for ?

Mark Petry
Bainbridge Island, WA USA
I'm 6'2" so looking for at least 60cm, maybe up to 63cm.

Not super confident but I made a little checklist for myself:
-Check for dents on tubes by feel and visually
-Check that chainstays are not crushed by kickstand
-Check that seat tube not crushed by seatpost
-Checks for gaps in/around lugs
-Check that head tube is in line with fork
-Check that wheel splits fork blades evenly
-Check that fork blades line up from the side
-Check that rear dropouts are spaced correctly with ruler
-Check that rear dropouts are aligned visually
-Use string to check that seat tube and head tube are aligned
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Old 08-14-19, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by iamacat View Post
What are some good classic frames for commuting? Specifically interested in being able to fit larger tires (~30mm, hopefully more) with fenders because that's just what I need to do here in rain+pothole country (Seattle). There are lots of 70s and 80s frames for sale but not sure what to look for that would be a good fit for commuting needs.

The Trek 520 with cantilever brakes seem great. Just hard to find in my size. Any more like this?

Thanks!
Throwing in my vote for vintage steel mountain bikes; with the same geometry as today's adventure bikes, they're very versatile and quite inexpensive. Also, they'll take actual wide tires.
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Old 08-14-19, 12:14 PM
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Mid 80's Schwinn Voyageur and LeTour Luxe with cantis. If you can snag a Voyageur SP they came with Blackburn racks standard as did some of the LeTour Luxes.

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Old 08-14-19, 01:01 PM
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This is my mountain bike set up the way I like it and I DO like it. So far, got about sixty dollars Canadian into the bike and no need to spend any more, although I would like to find an inexpensive perfect feeling new unripped saddle for the machine...
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Old 08-14-19, 01:27 PM
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Hello,

Personally, I like better quality aluminum MTB frames less than twenty years old. They are light, don’t rust, durable and handle well in tight spots. My current one is a 2004 Giant Iguana with rigid forks, riser bars, disc brakes and 9 X 1 gearing. It’s about 25# with rack and basket. Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Van
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Old 08-14-19, 01:36 PM
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all of them
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Old 08-14-19, 01:45 PM
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I would also go with a good quality, older mtb for a commuter.
But nothing wrong with a classic Japanese steel road bike, either. I would look for something that takes long reach brakes, as well as the eyelets.

You know, now that Iím thinking about it, my favorite commuter is actually this old, dutch three speed cruiser.
Might be worth a look in that direction.

Last edited by Rage; 08-14-19 at 02:00 PM.
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Old 08-14-19, 01:50 PM
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+1 on vintage MTBs as they run fat tires with lots of room for fenders and most have a good selection of braze- ons.

Next week Bikeworks co-op in Columbia city is having their warehouse sale you might want to check that out or go to their warehouse most any Saturday (check their calendar) as they usually have a selection of project bike if your willing to do some basic maintenance you can find some good deals heck I even lucked into a Trek 520 there a few month back so you never know.
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Old 08-14-19, 01:54 PM
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Craigslist

If it were me, I'd favor an aluminum rigid with 26 inch wheels, rack & fender eyelets. But steel is just as well.

Then I'd junk whatever knobby hard rolling mountain bike tire was on it in favor of some 26x 1.1 slicks up to 26x1.5 commuter tires.

I favor 559-28 Continental Gatorskins (aka 26x1.1 or 26x1 1/8)

For in city use anything bigger that 1.5 or has knobs really isn't necessary, gets heavy, and rolls slow unless they are super light & thin; which disqualifies them from "commuter" purposes, IMO.
I'm sure many will have their own opinion.

I'd avoid vintage anything with suspension. That's just like asking for old, obsolete, worn, broken garbage. I'm not saying there might not be a true gem of garage queen wonderfulness out there. I am saying that the potential for problems & expense just isn't worth the risk or the trouble.

Good luck.

Oh, FWIW: check out Bike Works in Columbia City, on Ferdinand Street. What you are looking for is their specialty.

Last edited by base2; 08-14-19 at 02:06 PM.
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Old 08-14-19, 02:00 PM
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It's hard to argue with the old mountain bike advice, but I'm going to try.

I gave the rigid mountain bike thing a go with a 1989 Specialized RockHopper built up like this:



It was a decent bike, perfectly fine for commuting. I think I've got 26x1.75 tires on it in this picture. It would fit much over 26x2, but you don't need that for commuting. The problem, to the extent that there was a problem, was that I actually wanted a road bike, not a mountain bike, and even when you put drop bars on a mountain bike the geometry isn't road bike geometry.

I'd counter that what you actually want is some kind of sport touring bike. I think I saw a nice Miyata 310 on Seatle CL. There are many other options. It sounds like you have your preferences dialed in pretty well. I bet if you stop by Bike Works they'd have something that fit your needs.

Here's my 1982 Specialized Sequoia as an example of a sport touring bike built kind of like you seem to want.

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Old 08-14-19, 02:31 PM
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here's a good one that is looking for a home. Hardly ridden and your size. PM sent.

Mark Petry
Bainbridge Island, WA USA



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Old 08-14-19, 02:56 PM
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Early 80's Japanese mid level bikes like bike like Nishiki, Centurion, panasonic, bridgestone, univega get my vote you can keep them simple (friction or upgrade) easy to work on and good quality

easy to put a north style bar on for more upright commuting (and then use a thumb shifter)

both of these wold work, the bridgestone is a upper end model

and to be clear Steel frames are not heavier than aluminum

63 cm in bellingham $125 https://bellingham.craigslist.org/bi...945112402.html

loooks like a nice bridgestone $325 https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/b...953742405.html
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Old 08-14-19, 04:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
It's hard to argue with the old mountain bike advice, but I'm going to try.

I gave the rigid mountain bike thing a go with a 1989 Specialized RockHopper built up like this:



It was a decent bike, perfectly fine for commuting. I think I've got 26x1.75 tires on it in this picture. It would fit much over 26x2, but you don't need that for commuting. The problem, to the extent that there was a problem, was that I actually wanted a road bike, not a mountain bike, and even when you put drop bars on a mountain bike the geometry isn't road bike geometry.

An alternate view. Many tourers now come with 26 inch wheels, either as standard or an option. Bikes like the Surly Long Haul Trucker come to mind. Geometry of vintage MTBs are all over the map, so you do have to choose carefully. I find the fit on my 1988 Cimarron to be very similar the the 1990 Miyata 600 GT. Tire size is a huge plus on the MTBs, I've gone as high as 2.35 inches wide. Hard to get anything close to that with a traditional tourer or sport tourer.

The other advantage of a rigid frame MTB is cost. Nice rigid frame MTBs are typically around $100. Sure, the super desirable names like the early Stumpjumpers are much higher.

Do be careful on size. I've seen as much as 2 inch difference in top tube length, for the same size MTB, between models and brands.

My Cimarron was a garage sale pickup, in deplorable condition, but only $15. I recently picked up a lightly used 1990 Shogun MTB, full Deore XT, for $65 and did a "transplant". I like how it turned out.

Again, not all MTBs work out that well, and they are not for everyone. Doing an upright conversion, to North Road handlebars, is the cheapest option. That way you can use original shifters and brake levers. I've done a few of those for family and friends.


88 Cimarron 2019 Version by wrk101, on Flickr


Schwinn Sierra NR by wrk101, on Flickr
1988 High Sierra 3 by wrk101, on Flickr

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Old 08-14-19, 05:13 PM
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Interesting to see all these suggestions for sporty machines. Where I live the most important quality of a commuter bike is that you can just hop on in your suit and tie and pedal to work. Upright bikes with fenders and closed chain cases have a distinct advantage in that respect.

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Old 08-14-19, 05:19 PM
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How old are you looking? This is my hybrid to drop conversion. Frame dates to about 2000. 520 steel.

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Old 08-14-19, 05:45 PM
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Originally Posted by iamacat View Post
I'm 6'2" so looking for at least 60cm, maybe up to 63cm.
I think a 23" (58.4cm) was the biggest the Trek 520 was sold in, at least by going off the 90's catalogs I have seen. There may have been a larger size in the earlier years.

I'm 6'2" as well and fit a 23" 520 nicely. I have shorter legs, compared to my torso, so any larger and I wouldn't clear the top tube.


You didn't mention whether you want drop or flat bars so I'll echo either a vintage mountain bike or touring bike. Just note that rim brakes are not the best in wet conditions like Seattle, discs are better at that.

Last edited by katsup; 08-14-19 at 05:52 PM.
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Old 08-14-19, 05:58 PM
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Originally Posted by non-fixie View Post
Interesting to see all these suggestions for sporty machines. Where I live the most important quality of a commuter bike is that you can just hop on in your suit and tie and pedal to work. Upright bikes with fenders and closed chain cases have a distinct advantage in that respect.

I have a bike set up much like this (no chain case) and use a lot on weekend for errands (1 to 3 miles round trip typically)

But the question is how long is the average commute? My understanding is that it is not that far in the Netherlands.

over the last years my commute distance has varied from 5 to 10 miles one way, for me anything over 5 miles is better on a more "sporty" bike
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Old 08-14-19, 06:42 PM
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Originally Posted by iamacat View Post
I'm 6'2" so looking for at least 60cm, maybe up to 63cm.

Not super confident but I made a little checklist for myself:
-Check for dents on tubes by feel and visually
-Check that chainstays are not crushed by kickstand
-Check that seat tube not crushed by seatpost
-Checks for gaps in/around lugs
-Check that head tube is in line with fork
-Check that wheel splits fork blades evenly
-Check that fork blades line up from the side
-Check that rear dropouts are spaced correctly with ruler
-Check that rear dropouts are aligned visually
-Use string to check that seat tube and head tube are aligned
https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/b...951753751.html
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Old 08-14-19, 06:47 PM
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Agreed here... I just finished putting together a commuter using a mid-70ís Japanese frame and a Suntour Blue Line group (like this linked Univega has), as well as upright bars. Univegas are great bikes and easy to work on.
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Old 08-14-19, 07:14 PM
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Originally Posted by iamacat View Post
What are some good classic frames for commuting? Specifically interested in being able to fit larger tires (~30mm, hopefully more) with fenders because that's just what I need to do here in rain+pothole country (Seattle). There are lots of 70s and 80s frames for sale but not sure what to look for that would be a good fit for commuting needs.

The Trek 520 with cantilever brakes seem great. Just hard to find in my size. Any more like this?

Thanks!
Best to not over think it. Lots and lots of old frames would make fine commuters. It's the fit and build that counts, and that's all personal.

Mounting points for racks, bags, lights, bottles, etc., are all plusses.

If I had a daily commute, I'd ride this:

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Old 08-14-19, 11:04 PM
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Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
Early 80's Japanese mid level bikes like bike like Nishiki, Centurion, panasonic, bridgestone, univega get my vote you can keep them simple (friction or upgrade) easy to work on and good quality

easy to put a north style bar on for more upright commuting (and then use a thumb shifter)

both of these wold work, the bridgestone is a upper end model

and to be clear Steel frames are not heavier than aluminum

63 cm in bellingham $125 https://bellingham.craigslist.org/bi...945112402.html

loooks like a nice bridgestone $325 https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/b...953742405.html
+1 There were many Japanese mid-level road bikes sized for 27" wheels. Running 700c allows a bigger tire size and fenders. My winter/rain/city fix gear is almost one of those frames. (~1983 Trek 400 quite possibly Japanese tubing and manufacture). Previous editions of that bike had a Miyata 610 frame, ~1983 (with lost of tire room), a (I believe Canadian built) Sekine of roughly the same time and a Japanese built Schwinn, ~1981. These frames were not all Japanese, but they were all from that time period, all ISO standard, all horizontal dropout and all allowed reasonably big tires. The Miyata was purchased as a full bike, the rest as just frames.

On plus of this approach - things happen to commuters. Those frames were so similar that almost all the parts would just lift off one frame and go on the next. Even bottom brackets, headsets and seatposts. One evening of work and often nothing to buy beyond cables and the like.

Thankfully, the Japanese built thousands of those bikes and inspired makers in Europe and the US to do the same. Those bikes are out there to be had.

Ben
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Old 08-15-19, 01:07 AM
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Old 08-15-19, 01:08 AM
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