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AAA against bike lanes? yes...

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AAA against bike lanes? yes...

Old 10-03-10, 03:20 PM
  #26  
tjspiel
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Originally Posted by whitecat View Post
If every cyclist was packing, I bet there would be no drivers so keen on arguing with them. Let's call it evening the odds - on one side there is a couple of tons of metal, on another a ready clip of stored lead to be used if need be. It might sound crude, but the reality is that in that case, we would hear about motorists harassing cyclists once in a blue moon, if that.
Sorry, the occaisional honk and even off color remark is not worth the hassle of packing.
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Old 10-03-10, 05:07 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by whitecat View Post
Yes, why is that hard to believe? It's obvious. It cuts down on their sales of oil products, and the larger number of people that ride bikes, the more they loose in sales.
Funny; my current client is a major producer of oilfield products, and one of the few employers in the county with a large bike rack. I contracted for one of the oil giants at a remote site once, and they had a policy in place to allow company trucks to be used to pick up bike commuters at the turnoff from the paved road since the last 3 miles of poorly maintained dirt county road would have been really tough even on a hybrid.
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Old 10-05-10, 10:21 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by tjspiel View Post
Anyway, in spite of all that, and the fact that my only collision with a car happened in a bike lane, I'm still mostly in favor of them. Why? Because they make cyclists feel safer and give motorists less reason to hassle them. This puts more cyclists on the road and creates more cycling advocates. More cyclists on the road IMO ultimately leads to better conditions for cyclists if for no other reason than drivers get used to them being there.
* Sorry, I prefer to BE safe than to "feel" safe.
* Mandatory use laws, like we have here, force cyclists to ride in poorly designed bike lanes where it is not safe.
* I get much more harassment on roads with bike lanes, when I must (unlawfully) leave them to achieve an acceptable level of safety.
* I'm sick and tired of hearing about the "lemming" myth wherein unsafe facilities attract more users to make us all safer.
 
Old 10-05-10, 12:44 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Arcanum View Post
You're not understanding bhop's question. Why do you think AAA is against bike lanes?
Well if city planners are making room for bike lanes by eliminating an auto lane of course the auto-holics reaction is going to be, what I'm losing one of MY lanes!! (not thinking if the bike lane is full of people that would have otherwise drove how clear their other lane will be!)
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Old 10-05-10, 01:09 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by kraftwerk View Post
Kojak

Have you thought about helping plan bike lanes in your community so they will be a lot more useful for everyone?
True, Europe is better but we must start somewhere.

In NYC if a street is shared with a bike lane the cyclist is required to use it or risk getting a ticket.

You say AAA are "ostensibly acting on behalf of the opinions and wishes of those who make their existence possible. " Hey I am a memeber thats why i get their dumb magazine. But their sentiment is not in my best interest at all. That is like saying " Corporations are just looking out for their best interest" Which is the attitude which has almost ruined the modern world.

Full disclosure : I own two old clunkers but only use them if I need to go further than 25 miles, otherwise I take one of my bicycles which I much prefer.

ps. I love my Schwalbe Stelvios 451 on my folding bike.
I have seriously considered getting involved with the local area Bicycle Coalition; maybe sooner than later.

My time here is coming to an end as we are losing our child care provider, and it looks like I'm on deck (my wife is a University professor which trumps tire huckster 999 times out of a 1,000). If I can eek out the time, I'd like to get involved, and see where it leads me. My career has taken so many twists and turns in the last 5 years I'm not sure what to expect other than the unexpected. I may eventually land back here once the kids are in school full time, then again, I may not.

To clarify my position, I'm not against bike lanes per se, I'm just not thrilled about the current state of affairs, and as a confident cyclist, I feel safer taking up a lane rather than being shunted to the side of the road. The inference I get is "you don't belong on the road, you belong out of the way". A sentiment which is backed up by laws (as you mentioned) which require me to be in a bike lane if there is one. Does this mean that I can't merge into the left lane so that I can turn left? Will it be my word vs. a law enforcement officer in this situation if I get a ticket for not being in the bike lane? I have that very situation on my commute into work in the morning and have been verbally abused several times for "not being in the bike lane". Fortunately, the laws here do not require me to use the bike lane..... maybe I'd better check on that..........

Last edited by Kojak; 10-05-10 at 01:13 PM.
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Old 10-06-10, 06:43 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Kojak View Post
My time here is coming to an end as we are losing our child care provider, and it looks like I'm on deck...
I'm a full-time dad. It's not a huge burden, as long as you train the kids to be somewhat self-sufficient. The trick is to get them to do stuff for themselves as soon as they're old enough. It's easy to get drawn into being at their beckon call whenever they want anything - even if it's stuff they can easily do for themselves. The first three years are a lot of work (although nap time gives you a break), but as the kid gets more independent it gets a lot easier. By 6 or 7 they are pretty self-sufficient except for meal times. My daughter is 7 now and she dresses herself in the morning, gets herself snacks, drinks etc., and since she's at school, that whole block from 9 to 3 is free time for me.
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Old 10-06-10, 06:50 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by soho2009 View Post
Dont really understand the issue of debris. I ride by two junk yards on my commute and have "learned" to equip my bike with tires and tubes that can handle the debris. Why somone would commute with a tire set that would keep them from riding in bike lanes is beyond me.
It's more the slippage issue that makes debris a danger, not the puncture issue. Sand and glass in the gutter (or the bike lane) makes it just that little bit more slippery, and larger debris or holes in the surface can cause loss of control if you come upon them unexpectedly. Anyway, I prefer to ride in the traffic lane, so for me, the debris issue simply allows me to do that legally in a state that mandates bike lane use when one is present on the road. So it's not a question of debris 'keeping me' from using a bike lane - it's an issue of debris 'allowing me' to use the road (as I feel I should have the same right to as any other vehicle).
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Old 10-06-10, 12:47 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by ianbrettcooper View Post
I'm a full-time dad. It's not a huge burden, as long as you train the kids to be somewhat self-sufficient. The trick is to get them to do stuff for themselves as soon as they're old enough. It's easy to get drawn into being at their beckon call whenever they want anything - even if it's stuff they can easily do for themselves. The first three years are a lot of work (although nap time gives you a break), but as the kid gets more independent it gets a lot easier. By 6 or 7 they are pretty self-sufficient except for meal times. My daughter is 7 now and she dresses herself in the morning, gets herself snacks, drinks etc., and since she's at school, that whole block from 9 to 3 is free time for me.
Thanks for the pep-talk. Our son will be 5 in January, our daughter is 6 months old. Our son is pretty self-sufficient when he's pressed to do so, and is generally a great kid (every 4 yo has his/her moments). Our daughter... not so much on the self sufficiency side but she is an unbelievably happy baby so that's definitely going to help.
The initial adjustment is probably going to be the most difficult part. I've been working at some sort of paying job since I was 13, so after nearly 40 years of employment, to not have that will be something very different for me. It will also be interesting to me to see how I deal with having very limited adult interaction for 9-10 hours a day. But, come October 29..... the madness begins.
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Old 10-06-10, 01:48 PM
  #34  
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Hey, just a quick note -- it's worth reading about the history of Europe's transition <i>to</i> bikes from cars in the 50s-90s. There are a lot of different things that worked, but there are also some common themes.
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