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Old 02-24-15, 08:54 AM
  #2001  
queerpunk
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I know a guy who's about 5'5" who tells stories about his old leadout man, who was like waaaaay over 6 feet. He says he'd have to maneuver another rider in between them and conduct the leadout like that.
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Old 02-25-15, 01:13 AM
  #2002  
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How is it legal for Bauge to wear the Giro Air Attack with the ear flaps? Doesn't that go against the rule of commercially available equipment (article 1.3.007 of the Clarification Guide of the UCI Technical Regulation)

Last edited by taras0000; 02-25-15 at 01:31 AM.
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Old 02-25-15, 03:32 AM
  #2003  
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Originally Posted by taras0000 View Post
How is it legal...
Saw a CZE female rider during the elimination of the Omnium with a PC7 on the handlebars and the screen not covered too!
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Old 02-25-15, 02:10 PM
  #2004  
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What timing systems are people using out there at their tracks? We bring out the physical loops that we tape down but we do not leave it out and apparently didn't have the foresight to make it permanent.

Is there an IR/beacon system out there? Something that grabs a transponder as it goes by? I used something like this in my race car a few years ago but it was a little bulky.
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Old 02-25-15, 02:57 PM
  #2005  
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Doing my first race on a 333 track this weekend (have previously only raced on a 400). One of the events is a flying 200. As I'm used to it, I would basically dive out of the top of turn 2 towards the 200 meter line, which was between turn 2 and 3, and then ride the line from there on out.

Any basic advice for a flying 200 on a 333 track?

Thanks!
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Old 02-25-15, 04:18 PM
  #2006  
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Originally Posted by gtrob View Post
What timing systems are people using out there at their tracks? We bring out the physical loops that we tape down but we do not leave it out and apparently didn't have the foresight to make it permanent.

Is there an IR/beacon system out there? Something that grabs a transponder as it goes by? I used something like this in my race car a few years ago but it was a little bulky.
Most use stopwatches by hand.

At DLV a volunteer has been building a timing strip system using Arduinos that's he's been maturing over the last 3 years. We've even laid underground cabling for his system. It's very mature now.

Originally Posted by dudeyagnarbro View Post
Doing my first race on a 333 track this weekend (have previously only raced on a 400). One of the events is a flying 200. As I'm used to it, I would basically dive out of the top of turn 2 towards the 200 meter line, which was between turn 2 and 3, and then ride the line from there on out.

Any basic advice for a flying 200 on a 333 track?

Thanks!

Advice: Get there early and ask a couple of locals about how many laps you get during the windup, the line to take, and when to accelerate. It's a common mistake for visitors to do the wrong number of windup laps and either accelerate too late or too early.
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Old 02-25-15, 05:51 PM
  #2007  
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Originally Posted by gtrob View Post
What timing systems are people using out there at their tracks? We bring out the physical loops that we tape down but we do not leave it out and apparently didn't have the foresight to make it permanent.

Is there an IR/beacon system out there? Something that grabs a transponder as it goes by? I used something like this in my race car a few years ago but it was a little bulky.
I'm was working on a system that reflects an IR beam, self contained on the bike except for the reflectors. Can't use it in Milton anyways tho because the track doesn't allow anything on the bike. Originally had the intention of producing it for a friend that's the head mech there. May go ahead with it anyway, just not a pressing matter for me at the moment.
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Old 02-25-15, 06:18 PM
  #2008  
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Originally Posted by dudeyagnarbro View Post
Doing my first race on a 333 track this weekend (have previously only raced on a 400). One of the events is a flying 200. As I'm used to it, I would basically dive out of the top of turn 2 towards the 200 meter line, which was between turn 2 and 3, and then ride the line from there on out.

Any basic advice for a flying 200 on a 333 track?

Thanks!
I also started on 400's and now live near Hellyer. You gotta start your effort father back, you start the acceleration at the 100m line (mid point of 3 and 4), keep accelerating down the fall from 4 at the rail, and start your jump basically just after you get to the top of turn 1 on your final lap. You will be doing a good portion of your acceleration along the rail from 1 to the end of turn 2, with no assistance from the banking, then you start your drop at the end of 2 as you would on a 400, but now (on a 333) you will hit the start line in about 10 meters. It's something that has taken me a while to get used to, doing it on a 400 is extremely straightforward in comparison.

Which 400 were you riding?
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Old 02-25-15, 06:21 PM
  #2009  
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Was previously racing at Kissena, and doing this weekend's Hellyer race.
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Old 02-26-15, 01:51 AM
  #2010  
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Three small questions:
1. Where do you buy your chain rings from?
2. Is buying used chainrings - bad idea?
3. Why are chainrings so expensive?!?
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Old 02-26-15, 07:33 AM
  #2011  
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Originally Posted by TurtleRacer View Post
Three small questions:
1. Where do you buy your chain rings from?
2. Is buying used chainrings - bad idea?
3. Why are chainrings so expensive?!?
2. Not if its straight and the teeth aren't worn. The life of a chainring is much longer than the life of a cog.
3. Generally chainrings are made out of stronger more expensive aluminum like 7075 to reduce wear and extend life. There is considerable amount of machine time to cut out all the tooth profiles, and then you have heat treating. I imagine there is a considerable amount of waste factored into the cost after all the excess metal is removed.
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Old 02-26-15, 07:41 AM
  #2012  
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Originally Posted by nspace View Post
2. Not if its straight and the teeth aren't worn. The life of a chainring is much longer than the life of a cog.
3. Generally chainrings are made out of stronger more expensive aluminum like 7075 to reduce wear and extend life. There is considerable amount of machine time to cut out all the tooth profiles, and then you have heat treating. I imagine there is a considerable amount of waste factored into the cost after all the excess metal is removed.
+1.

Id add to that make sure its round. Although that might seem like a ridiculous statement, the lower end chainrings can be ever so slightly ovalled. very difficult to spot just looking at them, but get them on the bike and you'll have hard time getting your chain tension right. At one point it will be loose, and another tight. PITA!
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Old 02-26-15, 11:54 AM
  #2013  
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Originally Posted by nspace View Post
2. Not if its straight and the teeth aren't worn. The life of a chainring is much longer than the life of a cog.
3. Generally chainrings are made out of stronger more expensive aluminum like 7075 to reduce wear and extend life. There is considerable amount of machine time to cut out all the tooth profiles, and then you have heat treating. I imagine there is a considerable amount of waste factored into the cost after all the excess metal is removed.
Machining and heat treat time is so much more expensive than material, but if you want really good rings you'd machine them after heat treat, which increases Machining time and tool wear generally
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Old 03-01-15, 10:33 AM
  #2014  
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Anybody knows where to buy FSA Track Rings in Europe? Or what is a comparable brand that is more widely available?
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Old 03-01-15, 11:05 AM
  #2015  
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Originally Posted by rndstr View Post
Anybody knows where to buy FSA Track Rings in Europe? Or what is a comparable brand that is more widely available?
Here
Track Chainrings from Velodrome Shop

I would pick Campy rings because they are not that much more expensive than FSA from this supplier.
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Old 03-01-15, 02:29 PM
  #2016  
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Evans cycle and Wiggle both have some track chainring selection. Evans currently have all dura-ace size in stock and Wiggle has the best variety available with TA track chainrings.
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Old 03-01-15, 03:29 PM
  #2017  
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I would be weary of ordering from velodromeshop.net. Have heard many horror stories about parts ordered not arriving, small items from same order being shipped separately and being charged twice for the shipping, as well as non-notification of backordered items. A friend had ordered a Casco Warp helmet and they didn't have it in stock. Was charged for the order, waited a month, called them and was told that they didn't have it in stock and were waiting for it to ship from the warehouse. I haven't personally ordered from there, but have friends that have had problematic dealings. No-one got ripped off, just really bad customer experience from all the things I have heard.
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Old 03-01-15, 04:01 PM
  #2018  
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Originally Posted by 700wheel View Post
Here
Track Chainrings from Velodrome Shop

I would pick Campy rings because they are not that much more expensive than FSA from this supplier.
I wasn't aware the Veldrome Shop is in the UK, thanks! But the price is mighty steep, £85 for the FSA (which they only have a 45T of). For £75 (+taxes) I get Sugino Zen rings at dolan-bikes.co.uk

I guess if I want FSAs I should be importing them from Retrogression

Originally Posted by Godsight View Post
Evans cycle and Wiggle both have some track chainring selection. Evans currently have all dura-ace size in stock and Wiggle has the best variety available with TA track chainrings.
How do the DAs compare to FSAs? I'd get the DA for ~$90 and the FSA for ~$75

Last edited by rndstr; 03-01-15 at 04:11 PM.
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Old 03-01-15, 04:25 PM
  #2019  
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Originally Posted by rndstr View Post
I wasn't aware the Veldrome Shop is in the UK, thanks! But the price is mighty steep, £85 for the FSA (which they only have a 45T of). For £75 (+taxes) I get Sugino Zen rings at dolan-bikes.co.uk

........................
I cited the velodrome shop because they stock FSA rings (according to their ad) but I have never used them. Probikekit has TA track rings for $59 and also a Campy pista crankset for $211. Probiekit and Wiggle have a been reliable for my buys.
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Old 03-01-15, 04:37 PM
  #2020  
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Originally Posted by rndstr View Post
How do the DAs compare to FSAs? I'd get the DA for ~$90 and the FSA for ~$75
DA and Sugino zen are probably the most used and close to the best rings you can get. Being in Europe, i would buy from Dolan straight to encourage a track bike company.
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Old 03-01-15, 08:42 PM
  #2021  
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One of those "velodrome shop" websites is known for having really long delays. Research before you buy from them.

Retrogression is owned by BikeForums member/admin Scrodzilla. I've purchased several items from him at great prices.

Edit:

http://www.bikeforums.net/track-cycl...eshop-net.html

https://www.trustpilot.com/review/www.velodromeshop.net

Last edited by carleton; 03-01-15 at 08:48 PM.
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Old 03-01-15, 08:45 PM
  #2022  
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Originally Posted by rndstr View Post
How do the DAs compare to FSAs? I'd get the DA for ~$90 and the FSA for ~$75
Dura Ace are considerably lighter than the FSA.

The FSA are a big aluminum disc. The Dura Ace are obviously CNC'd out to shave weight. Performance wise, the FSA would be stronger. I've heard that the Dura Ace will warp under the strongest of riders. But, 99.9% of us won't have that problem.

The quality control of the two are top notch. I've owned a complete set of FSA and later a complete set of Sugino Zen and the FSA were just as round as the Zen.
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Old 03-02-15, 01:07 AM
  #2023  
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Originally Posted by rndstr View Post
...
How do the DAs compare to FSAs? I'd get the DA for ~$90 and the FSA for ~$75
Originally Posted by carleton View Post
Dura Ace are considerably lighter than the FSA.

The FSA are a big aluminum disc. The Dura Ace are obviously CNC'd out to shave weight. Performance wise, the FSA would be stronger. I've heard that the Dura Ace will warp under the strongest of riders. But, 99.9% of us won't have that problem.

The quality control of the two are top notch. I've owned a complete set of FSA and later a complete set of Sugino Zen and the FSA were just as round as the Zen.
I have a full set of both FSA and DA rings. Some observations:

DA ring teeth are hobbed. FSA's teeth are machined. This gives the DA teeth a more accurate profile for better chain meshing (there is a lot of backlash with FSA rings; very little with DA) and makes the rings rounder. They are also nickel plated which seems to make them last longer. Because less attention is paid to the tooth profile with FSA rings, they take a bit of time to break in. There is no such break-in period necessary with DA rings.

DA rings are made from beefy aluminum stock. I've never heard of anyone warping one.

The machined out bits are really helpful for weight. DA rings are easily half the weight (for, say, a 50 tooth) of the FSA.

The FSA rings work well. The DA rings are really nice. I'd go DA (or Campy or Sugino) if you can afford them. The FSAs are yeoman rings. I don't know why anyone would go to any great lengths to find them. I got them because in the States, they are the cheapest option amongst legit track racing chainrings and freely available from many sources. They worked really well for me for a number of years, but they aren't anything special.
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Last edited by Brian Ratliff; 03-02-15 at 01:24 AM.
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Old 03-02-15, 01:45 AM
  #2024  
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Originally Posted by Brian Ratliff View Post
I have a full set of both FSA and DA rings. Some observations:

DA ring teeth are hobbed. FSA's teeth are machined. This gives the DA teeth a more accurate profile for better chain meshing (there is a lot of backlash with FSA rings; very little with DA) and makes the rings rounder. They are also nickel plated which seems to make them last longer. Because less attention is paid to the tooth profile with FSA rings, they take a bit of time to break in. There is no such break-in period necessary with DA rings.

DA rings are made from beefy aluminum stock. I've never heard of anyone warping one.

The machined out bits are really helpful for weight. DA rings are easily half the weight (for, say, a 50 tooth) of the FSA.

The FSA rings work well. The DA rings are really nice. I'd go DA (or Campy or Sugino) if you can afford them. The FSAs are yeoman rings. I don't know why anyone would go to any great lengths to find them. I got them because in the States, they are the cheapest option amongst legit track racing chainrings and freely available from many sources. They worked really well for me for a number of years, but they aren't anything special.
My experience with FSA, Campy and Sugino Mighty (as a pure road fix gear rider). I set my custom fix gear up 3 years ago with 1/8" for the first time, going 48t FSA for a start. I was pleasantly surprised at how round ir was compared to any 3/32" road chainring I had ever used fixed. Then I was given a Campy BMX 43t. Wow! Much rounder. Bought a 42t Sugino Mighty. Like the Campy. I'll stick to Campy and Sugino Mighty or better from now on.

(You guys would laugh at my skinny thighs and zero snap, probably asking why this guy even cares. But I have serious issues with chain slack descending hills on a 42-17 when I cannot remotely keep either the top or bottom of the chain consistently tight. And throwing chains at 40+ just isn't fun. Also on real hill rides, I flip the wheel or change cogs, sometimes often. Having a real window of slack makes for easier and faster hub adjust with round rings; never going tight but staying within a 1/2" slack.)

Ben
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Old 03-02-15, 08:02 AM
  #2025  
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Originally Posted by Brian Ratliff View Post
I have a full set of both FSA and DA rings. Some observations:

DA ring teeth are hobbed. FSA's teeth are machined. This gives the DA teeth a more accurate profile for better chain meshing (there is a lot of backlash with FSA rings; very little with DA) and makes the rings rounder. They are also nickel plated which seems to make them last longer. Because less attention is paid to the tooth profile with FSA rings, they take a bit of time to break in. There is no such break-in period necessary with DA rings.

DA rings are made from beefy aluminum stock. I've never heard of anyone warping one.

The machined out bits are really helpful for weight. DA rings are easily half the weight (for, say, a 50 tooth) of the FSA.

The FSA rings work well. The DA rings are really nice. I'd go DA (or Campy or Sugino) if you can afford them. The FSAs are yeoman rings. I don't know why anyone would go to any great lengths to find them. I got them because in the States, they are the cheapest option amongst legit track racing chainrings and freely available from many sources. They worked really well for me for a number of years, but they aren't anything special.
Thanks for explaining.

Baranoski's dad was the one telling me about DA rings warping under his son (the 0.1%).

You are definitley right about the FSA rings requiring a break-in. After about a year or two on my set of FSA rings, if I ever used one of the lesser used rings, I could feel the difference in smoothness.

I'd say that the FSA rings are to track chainrings are what the 105 Group is to road groups. Affordable, reliable, does what you expect, no complaints. If you have the extra money, then feel free to move up. But, FSA rings won't hold you back.

To OP:

Here is how the Zen rings are lighter than FSA:

The back-side of the FSA is solid:



Sugino Zen



I'm sure that more things go into making the Zen what it is, but that's one way that they (literally) shave weight.
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