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Old 10-20-18, 02:11 PM
  #1  
Donstu
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Copied over from 'Introductions'

Hi Guys,

I am new here and thought I'd introduce myself I'm a 47 year old ex army lad based in the North West, UK, who has just gone through a Heart Bypass 1 week ago.
I have been in hospital 6 weeks, now at home for the last few days and contemplating my healthy future. I work pretty much 7 days a week with a full time job and also a Photographer of Weddings etc...
I have always had a 'Can do' attitude and although i can ride a bike, I have only done a distance ride on a mountain bike once, in Austria whilst in the Army.
So... I have decided that I want to do a long distance ride, for charity, Lands end to John o Groats, on a mountain bike/tourer? I don't know bikes so I was hoping someone could give me pointers, something not Overly expensive..
Also if anyone could give any advice, that would be brilliant, nutritional info, realistic target to do it (I was thinking Sept 2019), things to carry, support team needed? etc....

Any help would me hugely appreciated

All the best

Stu
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Old 10-20-18, 03:45 PM
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fietsbob 
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Now you get the same bikes , From Taipei to Southampton
we get from there via LongBeach and Tacoma

the big container ports

Surly Trek/Specialized etc . chat up the shops near you ..


Very nice UK builder Mercian , is still making classic steel bikes..

consult your wallet.


....
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Old 10-20-18, 07:43 PM
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And spend a lot of time riding before setting off on this adventure. Day after day of cycling is quite different from a few hours squeezed in here and there. It will also help you confirm that your bike fit is correct.

Your body will thank you.
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Old 10-20-18, 09:05 PM
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If you are not a regular cyclist, consider doing the JOGLE (John O'Groats to Lands End) rather than the LEJOG. The hills in Cornwall are truly horrendous, and if you start off with them, you'll probably give up on the first two days. The hills in Scotland are longer, but not as steep, so it isn't as bad a way to start off, and by the time you get to Cornwall, you'll be naturally ride fit from the prior 900 miles or so. Just my suggestion, ymmv.
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Old 10-21-18, 05:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Donstu View Post
....just gone through a Heart Bypass 1 week ago....

don't even think about getting near a bike for at least a month. and avoid potholes for the next month. stretching your sternum where the bone saw sliced you open is, well, a tad unpleasant. stick with long hikes for the time being.


and do watch "crank." see jason statham doing kung fu a few hours after waking up following surgery. try not to laugh. that would be painful.


as to september '19, that would be doable, depending on your cycling conditioning/experience. i got on the bike a month after valve replacement, did a century a month after that, then rode china-thailand after six months.
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Old 10-21-18, 05:28 AM
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Originally Posted by RobSN View Post
If you are not a regular cyclist, consider doing the JOGLE (John O'Groats to Lands End) rather than the LEJOG. The hills in Cornwall are truly horrendous, and if you start off with them, you'll probably give up on the first two days. The hills in Scotland are longer, but not as steep, so it isn't as bad a way to start off, and by the time you get to Cornwall, you'll be naturally ride fit from the prior 900 miles or so. Just my suggestion, ymmv.
Cheers everyone for your valuable advice, I will be taking points on all of them. RobSN the JOGLE sounds like a seriously good bit of advice that I will certainly take into account. I won't be getting on a bike for some time yet but I will definitely be putting some riding hours in well in advance.

Thanks Guys
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Old 10-21-18, 08:53 AM
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Have you discussed your plans with the medical professionals? Perhaps discuss with them if you should get a heart rate monitor or one of the new fitness/medical trackers? When climbing up a hill on my bike loaded down with camping gear, I like to check my heart rate to see if it is getting up higher than it should.
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Old 10-21-18, 10:51 AM
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Iím not in favor of single person charity rides in general. Why not just be an example for family and friends of how to recover from heart surgery and live a healthy lifestyle? The amount of time and energy spent raising money as an individual is significant for little return, and distracts from your positive message.
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Old 10-21-18, 01:15 PM
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Speak to your physician They probably already have you lined up with a nutrition program. I had a heart attack a few years ago and the doctors told me to keep riding. But you will want to talk to your doc to see when they think you will be healed up enough to be able to ride.

Once you get on the bike, stick with it.
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Old 10-21-18, 06:18 PM
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howdy stu, given that you dont bike, I'd slowly over the winter start to become more active and then come spring, see how you like this whole push bike thing. I'm someone who has commuted by bike forever, and just plain love being on two wheels, so starting touring about 30 years back was a natural thing for me, but even then it was hard at times.
The most important thing is that you ride regularly, and sort out all the stuff that we regular cyclists have to sort out--bike fit, seats, bike shorts etc so we dont have a sore arse etc, and slowly develop strength and stamina--I reckon its pretty important to take it slowly and be realistic about what you can and want to do.
Certainly not to be pessimistic, but you have to start slowly and work your way into fitness and riding ability and being able to ride day after day.
All the best with this winters plans to get moving more and make sure the ol ticker is doing ok.
cheers from the colonies.
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