Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Specialized dropping women road specific designs

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Specialized dropping women road specific designs

Old 04-26-19, 09:06 PM
  #76  
MEversbergII
Senior Member
 
MEversbergII's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Lexington Park, Maryland
Posts: 1,239

Bikes: Current: Origami Crane 8, Trek 1200 Former: 2012 Schwinn Trailway

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked 19 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by NomarsGirl View Post
She's further up in this thread. Post 12.
Cheers; looked more orange than pink to me, so I figured it was a different bike.

Still sweet looking though.

M.
MEversbergII is offline  
Old 04-27-19, 08:57 PM
  #77  
a1penguin
Senior Member
 
a1penguin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Posts: 3,163
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 126 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
With sloping top tubes, stand over is less of an issue for finding a proper fitting bike. Women typically have smaller hands and brake reach and drop bar curl might also be problematic. Shops will often swap the stem at no charge, but no one wants to purchase a bike and then have to replace a lot of the parts. I suspect that these are more of a problem for people who fit the very small frame sizes, like 48s.

I am so tired of the mostly women's colors when trying to find cycling clothing to purchase. I don't want pink or aqua and I do not want flower patterns on my clothing. Often there is no high viz green/yellow in women's jerseys. While i don't see non-women specific bikes being much of a problem, it matters a lot with it comes to clothing.
a1penguin is offline  
Old 04-28-19, 09:47 AM
  #78  
Nachoman
well hello there
 
Nachoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Point Loma, CA
Posts: 14,951

Bikes: Bill Holland (Road-Ti), Fuji Roubaix Pro (back-up), Bike Friday (folder), Co-Motion (tandem) & Trek 750 (hybrid)

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 338 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by surak View Post
I think their marketing is pretty good, even the GCN show brought up this ad: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Be6RfwzwgRU
That's an awesome commercial. I sent that to my daughter to inspire her to get out there more.
__________________
.
.

Two wheels good. Four wheels bad.
Nachoman is offline  
Old 04-30-19, 06:36 AM
  #79  
Road Fan
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 14,203

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 805 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by AnthonyG View Post

A 24" wheel juvenile bike. Its a HUGE improvement geometry wise for short people over what came before it.
To toot again for Terry, this is the same message Terry gave in her early days in the market.
Road Fan is offline  
Old 04-30-19, 07:37 AM
  #80  
WizardOfBoz
Generally bewildered
 
WizardOfBoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Eastern PA, USA
Posts: 1,851

Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane 6.9, 1999 LeMond Zurich, 1978 Schwinn Superior

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 661 Post(s)
Liked 27 Times in 23 Posts
There should be big differences in frames for size and weight if one is optimizing for performance. That is, IMHO, frames for lighter people should generally be made with lighter gauge tubes or frame walls. To this end, "girls bikes" of the same size could be made with a bit lighter wall thickness than "boy's bikes". That's not just for weight: its for comfort and shock absorption. The geometry, to me, is a second order problem. You can adjust geometry with seat height and forward/rear positioning, handlebar width and stem length, and crank length. Color is funny. A 16YO girl might want a pink bike. A gal with a little more maturity might choose something more universal and classic and less "girly". So when a woman has the means to buy an expensive bike, she may not be looking for a hot pink frame, with unicorn decals.

The discussion of color reminded me: When I was young, I had a bike in a "girls color". Then, I was a strapping (6'2", 230#) college football player manly man - Nobody mentioned the color. I'd love to have that '71 Raleigh competition back again:

Last edited by WizardOfBoz; 04-30-19 at 01:57 PM.
WizardOfBoz is offline  
Old 04-30-19, 01:38 PM
  #81  
KraneXL
 
KraneXL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,173

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2811 Post(s)
Liked 64 Times in 54 Posts
Originally Posted by WizardOfBoz View Post
There should be big differences in frames for size and weight if one is optimizing for performance. That is, IMHO, frames for lighter people should generally be made with lighter gauge tubes or frame walls. To this end, "girls bikes" of the same size could be made with a bit lighter wall thickness than "boy's bikes". That's not just for weight: its for comfort and shock absorption. The geometry, to me, is a second order problem. You can adjust geometry with seat height and forward/rear positioning, handlebar width and stem length, and crank length. Color is funny. A 16YO girl might want a pink bike. A gal with a little more maturity might choose something more universal and classic and less "girly". So when a woman has the means to buy an expensive bike, she may not be looking for a hot pink frame, with unicorn decals.

The discussion of color reminded me: When I was young, I had a bike in a "girls color". Then, I was a strapping (6'2", 230#) college football player manly man - nobody mentioned it. I'd love to have that '71 Raleigh competition back again:
There's a guy I see at the gym that wears pink workout pants. Not sure if its now PC or his intimidating size that allows him to get away with it. Oh well, times change.
KraneXL is offline  
Old 04-30-19, 02:12 PM
  #82  
Riveting
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 478

Bikes: '13 Trek Madone 2.3, '13 Diamondback Hybrid Commuter, '17 Spec Roubaix Di2, '17 Spec Camber 29'er

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 164 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 16 Posts
My group has a woman who rides a murdered Venge. I've never once thought she was riding a "Men's" bike.
Riveting is offline  
Old 04-30-19, 02:28 PM
  #83  
KraneXL
 
KraneXL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,173

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2811 Post(s)
Liked 64 Times in 54 Posts
Originally Posted by Riveting View Post
My group has a woman who rides a murdered Venge. I've never once thought she was riding a "Men's" bike.
That's because we've grown accustom to accepting the change, and PC forbids any comment to the contrary.

There used to be women specific pant (the ones without front zippers) but today they don't exist anymore. The past generation would have balked at the similarities immediately.
KraneXL is offline  
Old 04-30-19, 02:59 PM
  #84  
livedarklions
Je suis Snap Motomag
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 3,832

Bikes: Trek FX 3; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; "Motobecane" Fantom CX

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1924 Post(s)
Liked 443 Times in 263 Posts
Originally Posted by KraneXL View Post
That's because we've grown accustom to accepting the change, and PC forbids any comment to the contrary.

There used to be women specific pant (the ones without front zippers) but today they don't exist anymore. The past generation would have balked at the similarities immediately.
So you think that women can ride black bikes because it's not PC to stop them? Do you actually read what you post?

What are you? 300 years old?
livedarklions is offline  
Old 05-01-19, 06:44 AM
  #85  
308jerry
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 179
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 80 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by TiHabanero View Post
Read with a chuckle the opinion piece at roadbikereveiw covering Specialized's decision to no longer market women's specific road designs. Going after the "white male roots" of the sport and the whole social justice nonsense gave me a chuckle and I chortled reading a response to the opinion piece framing the move as a cost cutting move and SBC spinning it to stink positive like a rose. Having been a dealer for 20 years, that is exactly what is going on here.

When SBC came out with the Ruby models they made sure we dealers understood the frame tubing was not the same as the men's models, and it was tailored to the lighter weight of a woman and the smaller frames. Apparently this is no longer a need. Marketing before truth. Makes good sense, no?


I'm late to this party and don't know if it's been brought up yet. Marketing is all about the sales and bottom line, they will tell an audience anything that will help increase sales, anything.... even if it's a little white lie. Sometimes they'll even tell an out and out lie, if they believe it will increase sales. How many times have we seen "New and Improved" on something like paper towels only to see its the packaging that's been changed.


If people are talking about the propaganda that the marketing department puts out, they all pat themselves on the back. It really doesn't matter if it's positive or negative, if it increases sales.


I look at the marketing/advertising as a pig. And hey I really like pigs by the way. Arguing about marketing is like mud wrestling with a pig, sooner or later you'll find out the pig really enjoys wrestling in the mud. And he doesn't care about who wins or loses .
308jerry is offline  
Old 05-02-19, 08:44 AM
  #86  
Craptacular8
Senior Member
 
Craptacular8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 504
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Wsd

Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
So basically, what made it a WSD is that they said so, and a splash of a rather subdued pink. Like I said before, Specialized should just offer the same range of colors and sizes and just let people choose whether or not they see it as appropriate for their gender.

It sounds to me like your bike would probably be a perfect fit for me, but I wouldn't have bothered to look at it because I would just assume there weren't any 56 cm bikes in the women's section. I really couldn't care less about the color. So basically, they probably cut off half or more of the potential buyers of that bike because they stuck it into a section where most men just wouldn't bother to look.

I do love that you got such a good deal off of a change in their marketing strategy.
For the Ruby, it was more than a splash of color. The Ruby had a longer head tube than the corresponding Roubaix. 52 Roubaix and 54 Ruby were identical in angles, and top tube length. Spec made the Ruby version more upright with the longer head tube than they did the corresponding Roubaix. And, like Trek, Spec also fitted them with a wider stock saddle than the men's (155 versus 143) and narrower bars (40 versus 42). It may just be my body type versus the "average," but I pretty much have always had to upsize when test riding a WSD bike versus the equivalent model in a men's. Whether that's been a Trek, Spec, or a Scott. I've nearly always been a 52 mens, and on all of the WSD I've either owned (Scott and Spec), I've needed to bump up to a 54. In all fairness, in the 2017 geometry, I also had to go with a 54 in the men's Diverge, but that's not typical.
Craptacular8 is offline  
Old 05-02-19, 08:54 AM
  #87  
Craptacular8
Senior Member
 
Craptacular8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 504
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by radroad View Post

Women spend money on yoga pants, shoes, makeup, stuff like that. Bicycles, not so much.
What total BS. I spend over a thousand a year on bike stuff alone, and that doesn't cover bike purchases. I don't think I haven't bought at least one new bike every year for that past 5 years. Have an entire stable of bikes I rotate through...walk into local bike shops where ever I travel for work, and typically buy "something" every time. Ride in two different regular club rides...one is mixed gender, the other is just women. They are buying new bikes, bike clothes etc every year too. I'm not an anomaly.
Craptacular8 is offline  
Old 05-02-19, 09:15 AM
  #88  
livedarklions
Je suis Snap Motomag
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 3,832

Bikes: Trek FX 3; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; "Motobecane" Fantom CX

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1924 Post(s)
Liked 443 Times in 263 Posts
Originally Posted by Craptacular8 View Post
For the Ruby, it was more than a splash of color. The Ruby had a longer head tube than the corresponding Roubaix. 52 Roubaix and 54 Ruby were identical in angles, and top tube length. Spec made the Ruby version more upright with the longer head tube than they did the corresponding Roubaix. And, like Trek, Spec also fitted them with a wider stock saddle than the men's (155 versus 143) and narrower bars (40 versus 42). It may just be my body type versus the "average," but I pretty much have always had to upsize when test riding a WSD bike versus the equivalent model in a men's. Whether that's been a Trek, Spec, or a Scott. I've nearly always been a 52 mens, and on all of the WSD I've either owned (Scott and Spec), I've needed to bump up to a 54. In all fairness, in the 2017 geometry, I also had to go with a 54 in the men's Diverge, but that's not typical.
That's kind of the point, though, there really isn't a "typical" man or woman's body, just some differences in the mean measurements for the two sexes. And those mean differences, other than height and weight really are pretty small. So designating some geometry differences as being "men" and others "women" is really arbitrary. A man is just as likely to need the more upright posture or the wider seat as a woman, in other words.

I've told this story before on BF, but the military discovered that a lot of pilot fatalities in WWII were caused by designing the cockpit to suit the measurements of the average male pilot, and when they studied this, they discovered that literally no one actually had those measurements. Thus, they were designing a cockpit that virtually no one could operate efficiently. Averages are useless in designing a product that has to fit an actual person.
livedarklions is offline  
Old 05-02-19, 09:21 AM
  #89  
livedarklions
Je suis Snap Motomag
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 3,832

Bikes: Trek FX 3; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; "Motobecane" Fantom CX

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1924 Post(s)
Liked 443 Times in 263 Posts
Originally Posted by Craptacular8 View Post
What total BS. I spend over a thousand a year on bike stuff alone, and that doesn't cover bike purchases. I don't think I haven't bought at least one new bike every year for that past 5 years. Have an entire stable of bikes I rotate through...walk into local bike shops where ever I travel for work, and typically buy "something" every time. Ride in two different regular club rides...one is mixed gender, the other is just women. They are buying new bikes, bike clothes etc every year too. I'm not an anomaly.
Totally anecdotal, but from what I've seen in the Boston area, the numbers of fully kitted-out, high-end bike-riding women are only a little less than men. It's certainly not anomalous.
livedarklions is offline  
Old 05-02-19, 02:23 PM
  #90  
MEversbergII
Senior Member
 
MEversbergII's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Lexington Park, Maryland
Posts: 1,239

Bikes: Current: Origami Crane 8, Trek 1200 Former: 2012 Schwinn Trailway

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Liked 19 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
Totally anecdotal, but from what I've seen in the Boston area, the numbers of fully kitted-out, high-end bike-riding women are only a little less than men. It's certainly not anomalous.
I haven't biked to work in ages, but there has always been people doing group rides in the evenings as well as individuals biking to and from the facility - I've started to notice more women now than when I rode (about four years back).

M.
MEversbergII is offline  
Old 05-03-19, 03:50 PM
  #91  
bbbean 
Senior Member
 
bbbean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Missouri
Posts: 2,063

Bikes: Giant Propel, Cannondale SuperX, Univega Alpina Ultima

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 319 Post(s)
Liked 27 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
That's kind of the point, though, there really isn't a "typical" man or woman's body, just some differences in the mean measurements for the two sexes. And those mean differences, other than height and weight really are pretty small. So designating some geometry differences as being "men" and others "women" is really arbitrary. A man is just as likely to need the more upright posture or the wider seat as a woman, in other words.

I've told this story before on BF, but the military discovered that a lot of pilot fatalities in WWII were caused by designing the cockpit to suit the measurements of the average male pilot, and when they studied this, they discovered that literally no one actually had those measurements. Thus, they were designing a cockpit that virtually no one could operate efficiently. Averages are useless in designing a product that has to fit an actual person.
Repeating and simplifying: "men" and "women" don't buy or ride bikes. Individual riders buy and ride bikes.
__________________

Formerly fastest rider in the grupetto, currently slowest guy in the peloton

bbbean is offline  
Old 05-03-19, 05:40 PM
  #92  
KraneXL
 
KraneXL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,173

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2811 Post(s)
Liked 64 Times in 54 Posts
Originally Posted by bbbean View Post
Repeating and simplifying: "men" and "women" don't buy or ride bikes. Individual riders buy and ride bikes.
To add to that line, sometimes its not just about the psychology (which is significant different, btw), but about culture and style. Both men and women wear pants, but aside from leggings, I don't believe they make women specific pants anymore either. At least none that I've seen.
KraneXL is offline  
Old 05-03-19, 06:59 PM
  #93  
bbbean 
Senior Member
 
bbbean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Missouri
Posts: 2,063

Bikes: Giant Propel, Cannondale SuperX, Univega Alpina Ultima

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 319 Post(s)
Liked 27 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by KraneXL View Post
Both men and women wear pants, but aside from leggings, I don't believe they make women specific pants anymore either. At least none that I've seen.
You’re going to want to ask a few of your female friends or relatives about that and reconsider.
bbbean is offline  
Old 05-03-19, 07:14 PM
  #94  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 6,735

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn

Mentioned: 99 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3592 Post(s)
Liked 161 Times in 121 Posts
Funny, all of my pants have pockets, but not all of wife's pants have pockets. Also, women's pants have more room in the back and less room in the front, for obvious anatomical reasons. Women's and men's clothing are still very different things.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 05-03-19, 09:40 PM
  #95  
KraneXL
 
KraneXL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,173

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2811 Post(s)
Liked 64 Times in 54 Posts
Originally Posted by bbbean View Post
You’re going to want to ask a few of your female friends or relatives about that and reconsider.
I was referring to casual pants, not the suits. For the record, jeans are a man's design (front zippers/pockets) adapted in some cases but not all to suit the female physique.

Having worked in retail, women can and most often do cross over to the men's department to buy jeans, work and uniform trousers.

Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
Funny, all of my pants have pockets, but not all of wife's pants have pockets. Also, women's pants have more room in the back and less room in the front, for obvious anatomical reasons. Women's and men's clothing are still very different things.
The point is, the female specific gap is closing. So to be fair, these bikes are just another item in that transition. There used to be a "lady like" component to behavior that's not taught to girls anymore these days. I think that's part of where the original bike sign came from.
KraneXL is offline  
Old 05-03-19, 09:47 PM
  #96  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 6,735

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn

Mentioned: 99 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3592 Post(s)
Liked 161 Times in 121 Posts
Y'all need to go to a department store sometime, because it seems like you haven't been out in awhile. Go to a Kohl's or a JC Penney-- the men's section is 1/4 the size of the women's. Forever 21 stores are massive, and only sell women's clothing.

My wife worked in the polo/khaki dress-coded places for about 15 years, and never once shopped the men's section. For all the same reasons I've never shopped in the women's section.

Don't get me started on shoes-- the women get 80% of the store. Men with big feet are lucky to get half an aisle.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 05-03-19, 11:36 PM
  #97  
AnthonyG
Senior Member
 
AnthonyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Queanbeyan, Australia.
Posts: 3,849
Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1614 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I'm actually wearing womens cut jeans precisely because they are cut differently from mens jeans. Mens jeans are pretty much all cut for tall and slim. For those of us who aren't tall and slim then by the time you get the waist right then its wrong everywhere else.

Womens jeans are much better for finding a wider fit and some stores stocking womens jeans will have a wide range of different fits.
For men two minor drawbacks to womens jeans are a short zipper and smaller/higher back pockets.

Anyway they are different.
AnthonyG is online now  
Old 05-04-19, 02:06 AM
  #98  
KraneXL
 
KraneXL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,173

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2811 Post(s)
Liked 64 Times in 54 Posts
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
Y'all need to go to a department store sometime, because it seems like you haven't been out in awhile.
You are right, its been a while, many box stores have popped up since then. But I spent many years there and I know that habits and the trends that began and continue in that direction even today.
Go to a Kohl's or a JC Penney-- the men's section is 1/4 the size of the women's. Forever 21 stores are massive, and only sell women's clothing.
It depends on the JC Penny, as their stores cater to the community. But they took a massive hit these past few years and have downsized greatly to survive.

Anyway, I'm tall, so I know JC Penny greatly (big and tall), and the ones I shop at have a huge men's department.

My wife worked in the polo/khaki dress-coded places for about 15 years, and never once shopped the men's section. For all the same reasons I've never shopped in the women's section.
Necessity is the mother of invention. When was the last time your saw a women specific uniform? Nurses? Flight attendants? Religious institutions? Now that I think about it, the military still uses them. But they're likely the last holdout.
Don't get me started on shoes-- the women get 80% of the store. Men with big feet are lucky to get half an aisle.
You're neglecting the athletic show section, and big feet (48) is one reason I spend so much time there. Athletic stores such as the Sports Authority and Oshman's (now defunct) were nearly completely male shoes.

Sporting good stores are similar which is why women get to transition. Although that is the one case were it absolutely doesn't matter as feet are feet.
KraneXL is offline  
Old 05-04-19, 11:32 AM
  #99  
JoeyBike
20+mph Commuter
 
JoeyBike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: New Orleans, LA USA
Posts: 6,855

Bikes: Surly LHT, a folding bike, and a beater.

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1053 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 16 Posts
Originally Posted by TiHabanero View Post
Read with a chuckle the opinion piece at roadbikereveiw covering Specialized's decision to no longer market women's specific road designs.
Money drives the market in a capitalistic society. Corporations are not philanthropic beings, unless it is somehow to their advantage at tax time. Women's cycling is certainly not driving the road bike market. So limited resources get funneled into money making departments. It's not just in the cycling industry. The auto industry has tinkered around with "women specific" car models. Mazda Miata comes to mind.

Money makes the world go 'round! Ask the Women's NFL players how much money they make.
JoeyBike is offline  
Old 05-04-19, 01:06 PM
  #100  
KraneXL
 
KraneXL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,173

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2811 Post(s)
Liked 64 Times in 54 Posts
Originally Posted by JoeyBike View Post
Money drives the market in a capitalistic society. Corporations are not philanthropic beings, unless it is somehow to their advantage at tax time. Women's cycling is certainly not driving the road bike market.
On the road I see men cyclist, and men riding bikes every day. Women riding bikes? Zero. Women cyclists? Only on the MUPs.

I'm sure there are enclaves where the portion is bigger, but certainly not a major economic segment. Women at local Bikeride events and rallies, however, number about 50 percent and about 1 in 5 at my LBS.
So limited resources get funneled into money making departments. It's not just in the cycling industry. The auto industry has tinkered around with "women specific" car models. Mazda Miata comes to mind.

Money makes the world go 'round! Ask the Women's NFL players how much money they make.
Then there's the WNBA or former WLB League? Nobody cares about women athletics unless the player look like they do on Baywatch. Husky girls just don't have the same appeal, for some reason?
KraneXL is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.