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Moving to Racing geometry frame

Fitting Your Bike Are you confused about how you should fit a bike to your particular body dimensions? Have you been reading, found the terms Merxx or French Fit, and donít know what you need? Every style of riding is different- in how you fit the bike to you, and the sizing of the bike itself. Itís more than just measuring your height, reach and inseam. With the help of Bike Fitting, youíll be able to find the right fit for your frame size, style of riding, and your particular dimensions. Here yaí goÖ..the location for everything fit related.

Moving to Racing geometry frame

Old 01-15-19, 06:46 PM
  #1  
hythamfekry
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Moving to Racing geometry frame

HI ,
i had an endurance road bike "scott speedster 2015" with endurance geometry , headtube is 13.5 cm , stem spacers originally installed with bike is 4 cm .
I purchased a new frame "scott addict rc 2011" , it have racing geometry with 10.3 "cm head tube "3 cm more than the speedster" , slightly longer reach and top tube .
i feel that riding on the hood on my speedster had more upright position than i want , however i can't ride on the drops for long time .
now when i'm installing the new frame , i need to take measurements to cut the fork ( stack on new frame will be 3 cm lower) .. i'm not sure how much spacers i should use at first ..
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Old 01-15-19, 08:26 PM
  #2  
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Start high, & lower the bars as you feel like it.

No need to cut the steerer tube right away.

Some folks raise & lower bars depending on season, fitness, etc.
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Old 01-19-19, 10:28 AM
  #3  
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Don't cut the steerer just yet. Set the bike up and install stem at highest or lowest position using spacers to take up the slack above or below the stem. Ride it and over a few weeks add or subtract spacers to get the desired stem setting. Then mark and cut. I always leave at least 10mm extra steerer above the stem for a "just in case" scenario, and spring time break in of the back to the position after a long winter break.
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Old 01-20-19, 02:33 PM
  #4  
hythamfekry
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Originally Posted by TiHabanero View Post
Don't cut the steerer just yet. Set the bike up and install stem at highest or lowest position using spacers to take up the slack above or below the stem. Ride it and over a few weeks add or subtract spacers to get the desired stem setting. Then mark and cut. I always leave at least 10mm extra steerer above the stem for a "just in case" scenario, and spring time break in of the back to the position after a long winter break.
well the only problem is that 4cm of spacers on old frame + adding 3 more cm to maintain same stack to compensate headset length difference , it will be hard to start with a 7 cm spacers
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Old 01-21-19, 01:02 PM
  #5  
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You have a good start by understanding the stack and reach of your frames. If you know the reach of your handlebars and the angle of your stem and the amount of spacers then you can duplicate your position by using this online frame comparison tool www.velogicfit.com go to the products drop down menu and select frame comparison and scroll down to the bottom of the page for the free access. Input all the specs from your old bike (select in the drop down menu) and adjust the stem and spacer info to get to the new position you want on the new bike. You will need to know the specs of both frames. This will get you an Hx Hy measurement which is the center of the bore for the handlebars. If using the same bars then no problem, however if they are different then add or subtract the difference of handlebar reach measurements to your current setup ( add if new bars reach is greater than old, opposite if shorter). That will give you the position to the hoods! Makes the numbers equal as possible and your positions will be the same, if you want higher or lower, more reach or less, make adjustments within the calculator.
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Old 01-25-19, 04:49 PM
  #6  
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Just put spacers over the stem ride it a summer 4 months or more then decide,,...
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Old 01-28-19, 02:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Carverbiker View Post
You have a good start by understanding the stack and reach of your frames. If you know the reach of your handlebars and the angle of your stem and the amount of spacers then you can duplicate your position by using this online frame comparison tool www.velogicfit.com go to the products drop down menu and select frame comparison and scroll down to the bottom of the page for the free access. Input all the specs from your old bike (select in the drop down menu) and adjust the stem and spacer info to get to the new position you want on the new bike. You will need to know the specs of both frames. This will get you an Hx Hy measurement which is the center of the bore for the handlebars. If using the same bars then no problem, however if they are different then add or subtract the difference of handlebar reach measurements to your current setup ( add if new bars reach is greater than old, opposite if shorter). That will give you the position to the hoods! Makes the numbers equal as possible and your positions will be the same, if you want higher or lower, more reach or less, make adjustments within the calculator.
Thanks for the site , appreciate sharing it , however my frame year is not listed there so i had to do the work manually through geomtry chart data vailable online and manual measurements , as i have 4 cm of spacers already on old frame and around 3 cm difference in stack and head tube height , i will start with like 5 cm of spacers and other 2 cm above the stem , have sometime testing the frame as other members advised and decide later if i want to cut the fork more or not ..
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Old 02-14-19, 10:57 PM
  #8  
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Fore / aft

I know Iím late to the party, but pay attention to your saddle fore-aft position in relation to the bottom bracket. I just went from a gravel bike to a road bike and positioned my seat the same as the gravel bike. The difference in seat tube angle put my seat on the road bike more than 2.5cm too far forward, but I didnít realize this until I rode on some hilly terrain and trashed my knees.
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Old 02-15-19, 09:15 AM
  #9  
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Originally Posted by Narf View Post
I know Iím late to the party, but pay attention to your saddle fore-aft position in relation to the bottom bracket. I just went from a gravel bike to a road bike and positioned my seat the same as the gravel bike. The difference in seat tube angle put my seat on the road bike more than 2.5cm too far forward, but I didnít realize this until I rode on some hilly terrain and trashed my knees.
well , it's never late , thanks for giving your input , hope you got better ..
I had a zero setback seatpost in my older frame , i tend to move my hips back while i'm riding , so i thought i needed a more setback seatpost .
so to be in safe side i purchased a seat post with flip flop clamp "FSA SL-K ITC 0/15" ... which have both 0 and 15 mm setback option just in case "specially the new frame have 2 cm longer reach" ..
it's sold for around 50$/new on ebay , it's a carbon/alloy reinforced seatpost , really nice seatpost .
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Old 02-15-19, 09:39 AM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by hythamfekry View Post
well , it's never late , thanks for giving your input , hope you got better ..
I had a zero setback seatpost in my older frame , i tend to move my hips back while i'm riding , so i thought i needed a more setback seatpost .
so to be in safe side i purchased a seat post with flip flop clamp "FSA SL-K ITC 0/15" ... which have both 0 and 15 mm setback option just in case "specially the new frame have 2 cm longer reach" ..
it's sold for around 50$/new on ebay , it's a carbon/alloy reinforced seatpost , really nice seatpost .
Thanks, man. Not 100% yet, but getting there. My Kestrel has a seat post that can be flipped in either direction, but I can't imagine flipping it forward. I'm 5' 9-1/2" riding a 55cm frame, and because of my femur length, I have to slam the saddle all the way back to the "max" line.
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Old 02-15-19, 11:19 AM
  #11  
hythamfekry
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Originally Posted by Narf View Post
Thanks, man. Not 100% yet, but getting there. My Kestrel has a seat post that can be flipped in either direction, but I can't imagine flipping it forward. I'm 5' 9-1/2" riding a 55cm frame, and because of my femur length, I have to slam the saddle all the way back to the "max" line.
Hope you get there eventually ..
I'm short , but i have the same issue , relatively long femur compared to my body , FSA SL-K had 20/-10 setback seatpost .. but also i didn't imagine riding a negative setback , so i got the 0/15 version so i have the chance to set a zero setback in case i had any back issue or something and wanted to flip the saddle ...
there's a +25 and +35 setback posts as well ..
i had the specialized Romin evo saddle like in pic .. it help me to be in a more backward position comfortably ..
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Old 02-15-19, 12:53 PM
  #12  
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Got any photos of it fully assembled? Mine isn't so flashy. Just dark blue with white lettering. I'd post a photo, but I'm not allowed to yet. 😂😢
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Old 02-15-19, 01:49 PM
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hythamfekry
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Originally Posted by Narf View Post
Got any photos of it fully assembled? Mine isn't so flashy. Just dark blue with white lettering. I'd post a photo, but I'm not allowed to yet. 😂😢
my frame was shipped without the headset ex pander cap , too bad to wait for extra week or two for a small piece ..
it's on the way by post now , may post a pic when it's fully assembled .
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Old 02-18-19, 10:20 AM
  #14  
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It should be simple to get the bars to the same height as your old bike. Just take a vertical measurement from the floor to the center of the bars on the old bike and put enough spacer under the stem to get the same height on the new bike. The Addict has a 10mm lower BB, so the bars should also be 10mm lower to get the same fit.

All that said, it's not wise to be using 30-40mm of spacer under the stem. If you need the bars that high, then use a stem with more upward angle. Neither solution looks pretty, but the stem angle solution is sturdier.
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Old 02-18-19, 12:18 PM
  #15  
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Measuring stack and reach
Stack and reach are posted for most new bikes. It's a good way to compare different frames for fit.

Got an older bike?
Here's a simple method for measuring your bike's stack and reach. Link to my thread post.

And I commented on how I use stack and reach and a stem angle calculator in this post.

(It's probably a little late for this thread, but useful for other riders.)

Last edited by rm -rf; 02-18-19 at 12:22 PM.
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