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Has there been any tech improvements on clunky brakes (2019)?

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Has there been any tech improvements on clunky brakes (2019)?

Old 06-16-19, 10:01 AM
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Aznman
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Has there been any tech improvements on clunky brakes (2019)?

Rim and disc brakes are mainstream in the West and disc brakes are the most researched from what I've been learning.

However, there are parts of the world where things like band brakes are (still) quite the mainstream.
Has there been any new development/ improvement when it comes to the 'clunky tech' of drum/coaster/band brakes in the year 2019?
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Old 06-16-19, 01:38 PM
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'

At Present time the Sturmey Archer manufacturing has mover To Taiwan. A division of Sun Race/ Microshift.

and the new company has expanded the offerings of Drum Brakes a 90 and a 70mm drum in several combinations ..

They are The remaining maker of Hybrid IGH and Cassette driver combo hubs after Sachs , bought our by Sram .. quit
to push the trendy 1 by And Race Bike components.

My British made S-A drum brakes have been reliable and service free for 30 years..
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Old 06-16-19, 01:54 PM
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You may consider them "clunky" but they have been around for decades and are still being manufactured, so they might be considered a mature technology.

Perhaps they sell better abroad because there are fewer racer wannabees and "weight weenies" and more folks who just need solid reliable transportation that that are easily maintained with simple tools, parts available for more than just this year's model, and which will last a lifetime.

They quite sensibly have no use for the latest and greatest 6kg delicate carbon fiber wonders with 33 speed computerized shift mechanisms, aerodynamic spokes and seatposts, when they just need to get to work or the pub.
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Old 06-16-19, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
'

At Present time the Sturmey Archer manufacturing has mover To Taiwan. A division of Sun Race/ Microshift.

and the new company has expanded the offerings of Drum Brakes a 90 and a 70mm drum in several combinations ..

They are The remaining maker of Hybrid IGH and Cassette driver combo hubs after Sachs , bought our by Sram .. quit
to push the trendy 1 by And Race Bike components.

My British made S-A drum brakes have been reliable and service free for 30 years..
Agree completely. But I do like my Magura hydraulic rim brakes...
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Old 06-16-19, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
Perhaps they sell better abroad because there are fewer racer wannabees and "weight weenies" and more folks who just need solid reliable transportation that that are easily maintained with simple tools, parts available for more than just this year's model, and which will last a lifetime.
I think there are at least as many wannabee racers and weight weenies in Europe as there are here, maybe more as bike racing is far more popular there. However there are far more bicyclists in total than here and, therefore far more utility riders.
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Old 06-17-19, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
Agree completely. But I do like my Magura hydraulic rim brakes...
Me too , HS 33 are reliable and need no post set up maintenance, other than new brake pads..
Kool Stop Salmon , red compound from Magura, are actually made for them by KS in Oregon ...


The SA drum brake wheels are on my winter bike, an old MTB, wearing Suomi made studded tires..

nothing goes clunk..






......
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Old 06-17-19, 08:33 AM
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Shimano makes 4 different roller 'drum' brakes for their Nexus and Alfine hubs, plus coaster brake versions, so i'd say, yes, there is some development going on.

As far as what companies like Sunrace, or any Asian manufacturers are making for their home markets, I don't buy bikes in China, so you'll have to do your own research on the ground there.
Doubtful that anyone is making drum brake upgrade kits for a 1962 Flying Pigeon, but you never know.
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Old 06-17-19, 08:52 AM
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Shimano has a roller brake its in a grease filled drum , coaster brakes are a smaller grease filled drum
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Old 06-17-19, 12:16 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
And disc brakes threw me over the handlebar and bruised my wrist...is it unnecessarily powerful for practical bicyclists.
Think you may want to reconsider your user name, for most users the frame will determine the type of brakes, with discs now being a very common type of brake on new bikes, If the brake threw you over the handlebars, you grabbed them too hard, learn how they work, and how much lever to pull for the required deceleration/stop.
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Old 06-17-19, 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
My cruiser has Taiwan Sturmey Arch drum brake hub. It must have very high quality or something. Because after all these days, it brake as good and roll as smooth as anything. And I leave it outside 24/7, 365 !!!

The drum brake is a genius design. It works on wet surfaces as well as dry. It keeps dirt and debrie out. Eventhough I ride alot on wet surfaces, the bike is completely maintenance free after all these years.

This is drum brakes are popular in Europe and Asia cities...for practical bicyclists.

Drum brake is a little heavier, however. For mostly sporting bicyclists in north America, they don't like the extra weight.
Drum brake hub also cost more...you get waht your pay for.

My bike with rim brakes stinks, it gets clogged with debry after riding on wet roads. I read that disc brakes have the same problem. I can see the debry already damaged my rim, after only two wet rides. So I ride my rim-brake bike only when the ground is dry and clean. And disc brakes threw me over the handlebar and bruised my wrist...is it unnecessarily powerful for practical bicyclists.
My disc brakes are debris free, always. The disc brakes grabbed you and threw you off the bike? Hmmm. Disc brakes work very good, maybe read up on the use first? They are great for mt biking and my bikepacking adventures. I'm 235, add a 60 lb bike full of gear. Add rain, mud and dirt roads. And some steep grades. Practical indeed.
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