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Have you ever see one fail like this?

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Have you ever see one fail like this?

Old 06-20-19, 01:56 PM
  #126  
redlude97
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Originally Posted by MyTi View Post
I just read the first post which gave no indication of what material the fork was. But my comments still stand. So you are saying there is some kind of prestige having a Made in Taiwan sticker versus Made in China sticker lol. I want some of that Koolaid.
Let's backtrack and double down on the ignorance by making this about prestige because we can't be bothered to read, but I guess we shouldn't be listening to someone who would be willing to change out parts on a whim based on anecdotal evidence on the internet
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Old 06-23-19, 02:24 PM
  #127  
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Originally Posted by redlude97 View Post
Let's backtrack and double down on the ignorance by making this about prestige because we can't be bothered to read, but I guess we shouldn't be listening to someone who would be willing to change out parts on a whim based on anecdotal evidence on the internet
I was being sarcastic. If I was serious I don't think I'd be riding on a carbon wheel set or carbon fork after all the exploding carbon parts I've seen on the interwebz. Seriously you thinking Taiwan is better than China is ignorant. Giant for one makes a lot of their stuff in China.
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Old 06-23-19, 07:09 PM
  #128  
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How is your cousin? Hopefully recovering well. I sure picked up the wire in the road I ran over, couldn't see it but sure heard it. And I don't run over the small branches either. So thank you for posting this, I didn't have to learn the hard way.
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Old 06-24-19, 11:39 AM
  #129  
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Originally Posted by MyTi View Post
Giant for one makes a lot of their stuff in China.
not anymore: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...-china-is-over

not that it matters to me...
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Old 06-24-19, 08:57 PM
  #130  
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Originally Posted by jideta View Post
Carbon is pretty tough.
Darn tootin. One of my bikes is rocking a 315g Time fork I scored for nix cause it had evidently come off a roof rack; one of the ally dropouts was bent pretty bad.

After riding it for a couple of years I think it's fair to say there's a bigger question mark over the dropout than the blades...
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Old 06-26-19, 09:59 PM
  #131  
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Originally Posted by edscott. View Post
Aluminium, carbon, steel, titanium: there is no way a plastic reflector would cause the break.
But the material being aluminium makes more sense: incorrect heat treatment with a cold spot at the height of the break would cause a discontinuity in the crystaline structure of the metal, creating a a weak spot prone to fracture. It makes sense that the fork broke at the same height on both sides, indicating fatigue along this weak spot finally gave way.

Also notice that broken steel forks in other images are not completely severed. This is due to the resilent quality of steel, completely lacking in aluminium.

I really don't get it why someone would use an aluminium fork instead of good quality steel or even CF, just because it is much cheaper to make for the manufacturer.
Resilience means springiness, before the yield point. In this case it would be about ductility (ability to plastically yield in tension, greatly, before fracturing) and malleability (ability to plastically yield in compression, greatly, before yielding). And steel IS great stuff. Ductility and malleability are fabulous in steel, in a low strength steel. Resilience is poor. As you increase the strength of steel, through cold working, or alloying and heat treating, or both, resiliency/spring without yielding goes way up, but the "spread" between the yield and ultimate tensile strength (fracture) is reduced. Steel makes great high strength springs, but you rarely see any plastic yield before fracture, rather, you get initiation of small fatigue cracks, those grow, until the stress is too high and then you have rapid fracture propagation. Also, harder steels are more "notch sensitive", a small scratch can act as a crack initiation point.

Aluminum is not as resilient as high strength steel, although low strength aluminum is as ductile as low strength steel. But high strength aluminum has quite a bit of resilience/spring to it, ask anyone who's tried to bend or form a piece of 6061-T6. But, even high strength aluminum would make poor springs (or a bike frame with a lot of flex) because it has poor fatigue strength, it doesn't like to be repeatedly flexed. But it can make good bike frames and forks if you use its lower density to allow larger geometry (big tubes) in order to make it rigid enough to last in fatigue. Good for race frames, but worse ride.
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Old 06-27-19, 01:02 AM
  #132  
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Originally Posted by MyTi View Post
I was being sarcastic. If I was serious I don't think I'd be riding on a carbon wheel set or carbon fork after all the exploding carbon parts I've seen on the interwebz. Seriously you thinking Taiwan is better than China is ignorant. Giant for one makes a lot of their stuff in China.
As a generalisation Taiwan definitely has a better track record for quality products than China.
Sure, you can get excellent stuff from China but I would still prefer Taiwan, especially if if wasn't a "name brand".
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Old 06-27-19, 06:08 AM
  #133  
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Originally Posted by superdex View Post
not anymore: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...-china-is-over

not that it matters to me...
They never moved their high end frame production like the TCR or Propel to Taiwan either...but I guess it's all the same...
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Old 06-28-19, 06:45 AM
  #134  
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Originally Posted by Duragrouch View Post
even high strength aluminum would make poor springs (or a bike frame with a lot of flex) because it has poor fatigue strength, it doesn't like to be repeatedly flexed. But it can make good bike frames and forks if you use its lower density to allow larger geometry (big tubes) in order to make it rigid enough to last in fatigue. Good for race frames, but worse ride.
You can have a great ride on a really stiff frame, if it's compact enough... Although my Roubaix is carbon, it only had a really plush ride after I put a carbon post on it. Pretty firm with a solid aluminum post, even at 27.2. I guess that's why later CAADs have a 25mm post.
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Old 06-28-19, 07:26 AM
  #135  
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Recovering

Originally Posted by Marci View Post
How is your cousin? Hopefully recovering well. I sure picked up the wire in the road I ran over, couldn't see it but sure heard it. And I don't run over the small branches either. So thank you for posting this, I didn't have to learn the hard way.
She needed some surgery to repair some facial bones, and she's done riding for a while, sorry to say.
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Old 06-29-19, 01:58 PM
  #136  
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Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post
You can have a great ride on a really stiff frame, if it's compact enough... Although my Roubaix is carbon, it only had a really plush ride after I put a carbon post on it. Pretty firm with a solid aluminum post, even at 27.2. I guess that's why later CAADs have a 25mm post.
I'm a retrogrouch, I like horizontal top tubes, not compact frames. Not just for looks, a long seatpost puts more bending moment into the frame. My 20" wheel folder has an ultra-ultra-long seatpost, and as a result, did develop a crack in the seat tube at the seatpost clamp. It sounds like you are having the carbon seatpost flex aft to absorb bumps, not sure I'd want that as it changes the seat angle a lot. My touring bike with a stiff aluminum frame has a slightly compacted frame in order to use a shock-absorbing seat post (that telescopes vertically with a spring inside), that is good design rationale and it makes a big difference in ride.
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Old 06-29-19, 04:30 PM
  #137  
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Originally Posted by Duragrouch View Post
I'm a retrogrouch, I like horizontal top tubes, not compact frames. Not just for looks, a long seatpost puts more bending moment into the frame. My 20" wheel folder has an ultra-ultra-long seatpost, and as a result, did develop a crack in the seat tube at the seatpost clamp. It sounds like you are having the carbon seatpost flex aft to absorb bumps, not sure I'd want that as it changes the seat angle a lot. My touring bike with a stiff aluminum frame has a slightly compacted frame in order to use a shock-absorbing seat post (that telescopes vertically with a spring inside), that is good design rationale and it makes a big difference in ride.
I would prefer a bit of post flex over a telescoping post which would give varying seat height.
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Old 06-29-19, 10:25 PM
  #138  
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Even when it's aluminum?
The worst kind of Chinese carbon - containing 0% carbon!!!!
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Old 06-29-19, 10:37 PM
  #139  
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Originally Posted by Dean V View Post
I would prefer a bit of post flex over a telescoping post which would give varying seat height.
It's way better. The fore/aft movement is barely noticeable, while the difference it makes to the ride is huge. I use a bare carbon seat, and it's plush, using a 23mm tyre. One day I'll get around to putting on a 25, but I'm not in a hurry.

A telescopic seatpost? Lol. Commuting forum is that way.
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Old 06-30-19, 12:32 AM
  #140  
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This was posted a few years ago.


At this point of the crash, one can see some road debris (tire iron?) that was picked up by the wheel, and it was all over.

One might expect that one would simply ride over the debris, but another vehicle or bike may have made it bounce some.

Near the end there is a picture of the front wheel and broken fork. Fork broken just at the inner edge of the rim, almost exactly like the OP's case. In the clip, the rim is out of round, but several spokes appear to be pulled out of the rim, similar to what happened to the OP.
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Old 06-30-19, 05:14 PM
  #141  
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I happen to have this picture handy.
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Old 06-30-19, 05:31 PM
  #142  
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
This was posted a few years ago.
Yeow! Nasty
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Old 06-30-19, 05:47 PM
  #143  
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Originally Posted by Doge View Post
I happen to have this picture handy.
Pbbbbbbth. Only 'cause it was carbon. Steel would've...
...
...












...
Well, uh, steel is real.
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Old 07-08-19, 04:32 PM
  #144  
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Originally Posted by Dean V View Post
I would prefer a bit of post flex over a telescoping post which would give varying seat height.
Think about what you said; Are the input (road) shocks coming vertically, or horizontally?

A telescoping post does change height, but you set it up so that when statically loaded (1G), the height is correct for you.
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Old 07-08-19, 08:51 PM
  #145  
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Is anybody here seriously contemplating an ugly, heavy, telescoping post?

The flex of a carbon post is an exponentially more elegant solution to ride comfort.
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Old 07-12-19, 03:07 AM
  #146  
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It is very tough, it seems to me that it cannot be repaired.
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