Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Good old frames for commuter

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Good old frames for commuter

Old 08-16-19, 01:55 PM
  #51  
Bad Lag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: So Cal, for now
Posts: 1,084

Bikes: 1975 Bob Jackson - Nuovo Record, Brooks Pro, Clips & Straps

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 362 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 23 Posts
Originally Posted by Korina View Post
Throwing in my vote for vintage steel mountain bikes... they're very versatile and quite inexpensive. Also, they'll take actual wide tires.

I agree 100%. It's what I did, too.

Get a high quality, steel frame (no suspension). The cantilever brakes will do everything you need.

Add a comfortable Brooks saddle (B67?) to go with the upright bars. This is the best position for negotiating traffic.

Ditch the knobbies and get some wide Schwalbe Kojak tires (smooth tread).
Bad Lag is offline  
Old 08-16-19, 02:16 PM
  #52  
3alarmer
******
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 17,476

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 238 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15038 Post(s)
Liked 147 Times in 126 Posts
Some examples that I have put together myself here:







3alarmer is offline  
Old 08-16-19, 04:21 PM
  #53  
iamacat
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 23
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
some more possibilites

univega touring cantilevers lots of room $160 https://seattle.craigslist.org/skc/b...957864338.html






centurion $200 could be 700c already has eyelets looks clean https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/b...935348758.html





miyata fully set up $200 https://seattle.craigslist.org/kit/b...956869308.html

The 58cms are a bit small. Will look into that Miyata (it's kinda far. To get to Bainbridge you need to take a ferry or drive a long way.)
iamacat is offline  
Old 08-16-19, 04:29 PM
  #54  
iamacat
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 23
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post






They look great! How about a brief summary of each one? Were these 27" to 700c conversions?
iamacat is offline  
Old 08-16-19, 04:55 PM
  #55  
squirtdad
Senior Member
 
squirtdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Jose (Willow Glen) Ca
Posts: 6,279

Bikes: 85 team Miyata (modern 5800 105) , '84 Team Miyata,(dura ace old school) '82 nishiski,

Mentioned: 60 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 877 Post(s)
Liked 75 Times in 59 Posts
Originally Posted by iamacat View Post
The 58cms are a bit small. Will look into that Miyata (it's kinda far. To get to Bainbridge you need to take a ferry or drive a long way.)
got confused 60 to 63 is what you are looking for

ok 63 cm centurion elite touring $229 https://seattle.craigslist.org/est/b...948750658.html

__________________
Looking for more time to ride what I have
squirtdad is offline  
Old 08-16-19, 05:38 PM
  #56  
3alarmer
******
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 17,476

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 238 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15038 Post(s)
Liked 147 Times in 126 Posts
Originally Posted by iamacat View Post
They look great! How about a brief summary of each one? Were these 27" to 700c conversions?
... a couple were, but if there were issues like cantilever brakes (like on the Bianchi Randonneur) I just went with new 27" rims as preferable because a lot simpler. The biggest problems with older 27" wheel rims is that they are heavier than today's box section rims, and a lot of the earlier ones have an inadequate bead hook, or none at all. Otherwise, 27" wheels work fine for commuting (someone already said this in the thread).

All of them are relatively decent frames with either butted tubing or straight gauge 531. They are either '70's frames (with their more open geometry and longer wheelbase), or in the case of stuff like the Cannondale, touring models as designed.

As someone else has already said, unless you have a ready source for parts to swap out and do a lot of work yourself, it will probably be cheaper in the long run to buy something already purposed to your needs.

But that Centurion pictured for sale would be an easy conversion if the wheel/rims are solid and have a decent bead hook. And it's a solid package.
3alarmer is offline  
Old 08-16-19, 06:40 PM
  #57  
Korina
Happy banana slug
 
Korina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Arcata, California, U.S., North America, Earth, Saggitarius Arm, Milky Way
Posts: 1,257

Bikes: 1992 Specialized Rockhopper Sport, 2016 Giant Liv Rove Lite, 2004 Giant OCR1, 1995 Trek Singletrack 930 1988 Specialized Rockhopper Comp (frame)

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 465 Post(s)
Liked 102 Times in 76 Posts
Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
got confused 60 to 63 is what you are looking for

ok 63 cm centurion elite touring $229 https://seattle.craigslist.org/est/b...948750658.html

Sweet. If I was a foot taller...
Korina is online now  
Old 08-16-19, 08:13 PM
  #58  
cudak888 
www.theheadbadge.com
 
cudak888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Southern Florida
Posts: 23,905

Bikes: http://www.theheadbadge.com

Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 484 Post(s)
Liked 220 Times in 160 Posts
Originally Posted by non-fixie View Post
Interesting to see all these suggestions for sporty machines. Where I live the most important quality of a commuter bike is that you can just hop on in your suit and tie and pedal to work. Upright bikes with fenders and closed chain cases have a distinct advantage in that respect.
I was about to say something similar to this effect. The ideal city bicycle where you don't have to think about the bicycle is one with a full chaincase, an IGH, and all-weather braking; not to mention a dynamo hub if one doesn't mind the weight.

The only thing that one can improve around the English roadster gestalt (or Dutch/Danish/Chinese roadsters or "city bicycle" - take your pick) is to build one around a lightweight steel frame. IIRC, there have been a few oddball offerings out there - not necessarily easily accessible in the US - that do combine the chaincase and IGH with lightweight frames, but not many.

I've often thought that it'd be nice if those one-size-fits-all fabric-covered chaincases could be purchased with an SKS-style mount that fits right behind the bottom bracket fixed cup/sealed BB drive side flange. It'd be the perfect way to chaincase up an IGH conversion on an old 531 frame.

Alas, every canvas-type chaincase repop I've seen has crappy chainstay clamps that will invariably slip, bend, and twist until the adapted chaincase becomes a bigger pain than it's worth. It makes more sense to use a modern-looking - but highly functional - SKS Chainboard partial chainguard and let it be at that.

-Kurt
__________________
cudak888 is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 11:44 AM
  #59  
KDR
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Almost anything built or sold by Rivendell. You might find a complete bike for less than you can buy and build an old mountain bike. My 1989 Bridgestone MB-3 checked all your boxes including eyelets for racks/fenders and it has handling that was quicker and closer to a road bike than most of its competitors of the same vintage. Plowing through deep sand/gravel I preferred my pal's Stumpjumper because its relaxed geos helped it go straight where my Bridgestone's front wheel wanted to hunt and weave. But, on pavement the MB-3 felt a lot more nimble and not twitchy at all. When I got a FS mtn. bike I replaced the stock flat bars on the MB-3 with some "Priest" bars from Riv. They are similar to their later "Albatross" bars. They worked well enough for me with the stock stem but I could have raised the bars a lot with a Nitto Dirt Drop stem or other high rise designs sold by Rivendell. I think you can find a lot of examples of this kind of bike set-up on the Riv site archives.
KDR is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 11:55 AM
  #60  
BurleyCat
Qfactor
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Nehalem, OR
Posts: 6

Bikes: Santa Cruz, Bridgestone, Raleigh, Rudge, Specialized, Burley, Schwinn

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by iamacat View Post
What are some good classic frames for commuting? Specifically interested in being able to fit larger tires (~30mm, hopefully more) with fenders because that's just what I need to do here in rain+pothole country (Seattle). There are lots of 70s and 80s frames for sale but not sure what to look for that would be a good fit for commuting needs.

The Trek 520 with cantilever brakes seem great. Just hard to find in my size. Any more like this?

Thanks!
26" wheels don't seem to roll as well to me, so I'm on a 27" steel frame English commuter...
BurleyCat is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 12:20 PM
  #61  
Korina
Happy banana slug
 
Korina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Arcata, California, U.S., North America, Earth, Saggitarius Arm, Milky Way
Posts: 1,257

Bikes: 1992 Specialized Rockhopper Sport, 2016 Giant Liv Rove Lite, 2004 Giant OCR1, 1995 Trek Singletrack 930 1988 Specialized Rockhopper Comp (frame)

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 465 Post(s)
Liked 102 Times in 76 Posts
Originally Posted by BurleyCat View Post
26" wheels don't seem to roll as well to me, so I'm on a 27" steel frame English commuter...
Interesting. I can reach the same speed with my '92 26" Stumpjumper as with my '16 700c hybrid, and the Stumpy has fatter tires and a more upright position. Fortunately we're all different, but we all enjoy our rides.
Korina is online now  
Old 08-19-19, 12:50 PM
  #62  
SilverSteve
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Boston, MA.
Posts: 28

Bikes: 2003 Iron Horse comfort bike (daily rider); 1985 (?) Centurion LeMans road bike; 198_ Puch/Austro Daimler road bike

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Commuter frame search...

Originally Posted by iamacat View Post
What are some good classic frames for commuting? Specifically interested in being able to fit larger tires (~30mm, hopefully more) with fenders because that's just what I need to do here in rain+pothole country (Seattle). There are lots of 70s and 80s frames for sale but not sure what to look for that would be a good fit for commuting needs.

The Trek 520 with cantilever brakes seem great. Just hard to find in my size. Any more like this?

Thanks!
Yah, check out a steel comfort bike, like Trek, Specialized, etc. with 35, 38 mm wide tires and cantilever brake.. good! I bought a Iron Horse comfort bike back in 2003 for $199 from a bike shop here and it's been nice and low maintenance. Added fenders, good to go! 7 speeds rear and triple rings front. 21" frame fits me and I'm 6'3" and long arms. Miles of smiles!
If you find one with suspension fork, better! Or you can add one to upgrade. ROCK ON..!
Boston, MA.
SilverSteve is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 12:56 PM
  #63  
ryansu 
Ride.Smile.Repeat
 
ryansu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 1,962

Bikes: 2009 Handsome Devil, 1978 Motobecane Grand Touring, 1987 Nishiki Cresta GT, Former bikes; 1986 Miyata Trail Runner, 1979 Miyata 912, 2011 VO Rando, 1999 Cannondale R800, 2012 Soma Smoothie, 1986 Schwinn Passage

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 517 Post(s)
Liked 87 Times in 71 Posts
Picked up this 93 Rock hopper in the Seattle area (Kent) for $65 back in June, it had a balky right trigger shifter which I replaced with friction, got a pair of nice Schwable City tires for $40 shipped from the UK, 26x1.95. Threw on a rack I had in the parts bin and bingo. I think this would make a great commuter and it has eyelets for fenders. YMMV

ryansu is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 01:09 PM
  #64  
BurleyCat
Qfactor
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Nehalem, OR
Posts: 6

Bikes: Santa Cruz, Bridgestone, Raleigh, Rudge, Specialized, Burley, Schwinn

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I don't ride with a speedo, so can't speak to relative speed. So 'seems' is as subjective as 'feels' when talking about rolling, but is a quality that definitely contributes to enjoyment. I wonder how a modern 700c hybrid compares to a vintage (upgraded) English 27"commuter? I can run 1 3/8" tires, with full coverage fenders, upright riding position and chainguard. Not all commutes are alike, but I appreciate an upright riding position for comfort, convenience and safety: any advantage to drops, or low, flat bars is offset by the need to keep an eye on traffic while staying clean and dry.
BurleyCat is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 02:00 PM
  #65  
Ged117
Senior Member
 
Ged117's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 166

Bikes: 1950 Raleigh Superbe, 1977 Peugeot AO8, 1990 Schwinn Voyageur

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 6 Posts
This is why I am excited to use my 1950 Raleigh Superbe for my 10km commute along paved cycle paths this fall. It has the 3 speed IGH with dynohub but also an external 3 speed derailer, so that'll make it a more versatile rider for fair season riding in the Ottawa valley hills. My Peugeot AO8 makes for a great commuter. I'm going to ride it in rainy weather (KoolStop pads) this fall, and build it a new alloy wheelset in October. I'll be able to use my studded winter tires once I build it 700c wheels - I just gotta set the frame and build my Sturmey four-speed hub into the new wheel. Folks really like the '70s Peugeots for commuting, and I am no different. I think it'll be much improved in terms of ride once I replace the steel wheels. It will be my winter or rough-weather, all around rider.

Yes it is French and can be difficult, but I have a cotter press for my British bike, so it helps already with the Peugeot and its cottered crank. Everything else is small potatoes by comparison. As this thread and others like it prove, there is no shortage of interesting old bicycles for general use. Steel is real
Ged117 is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 02:51 PM
  #66  
BurleyCat
Qfactor
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Nehalem, OR
Posts: 6

Bikes: Santa Cruz, Bridgestone, Raleigh, Rudge, Specialized, Burley, Schwinn

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
GED117, That sounds like an exceptional bicycle. Similar models are uncommon here in the USA. My 1950's Rudge Sports is all English construction, while my mid to late 60's Raleigh Sprite is a combination of English and French components. When Wheelsmith was still located in Palo Alto, CA, the Hjertberg brothers often commuted on stealthy, lightweight multi-speed, performance/commuter bikes from England and France. With the full fenders and chainguards, bicycle thieves didn't look twice.

Last edited by BurleyCat; 08-19-19 at 02:54 PM. Reason: grammar
BurleyCat is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 03:44 PM
  #67  
gugie 
Crapmaster Emeritus
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 7,469

Bikes: JP Weigle'd Raleigh Competition reconstruct, 73 Raleigh Competition 650b'ed, 96 Bike Friday NWT, 83 Lotus Classique, 78 Centurion ProTour, 73 Raleigh Grand Sports

Mentioned: 811 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2283 Post(s)
Liked 84 Times in 61 Posts
Haven't been following along too much on this thread, but has it been decided that the best old frame for a commuter bike is one that you can put two wheels, a drive train, brakes, cockpit and saddle on and when you pedal it, the thing goes forward, when you turn the handlebars it goes where you point it, and the brakes work?

In other words, the best old frame for a commuter bike is just about any old frame?
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is offline  
Old 08-20-19, 09:50 AM
  #68  
bark_eater 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Eastern Shore, MD
Posts: 513

Bikes: Road ready: 1993 Koga Miyata City Liner Touring Hybrid, 1989 Centurion Sport DLX, "I Blame GP" Bridgestone CB-1. Projects: Yea, I got a problem....

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 182 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 4 Posts
I like my Bridgestone CB-1. Its got a lower bottom bracket than a mountain bike and with the tires swapped for Tioga Power Blocks, I've surprised some of the skinny tire matching spandex folks.
bark_eater is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.