Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Bike Comparisons- All $670

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Bike Comparisons- All $670

Old 08-18-19, 04:11 PM
  #1  
Alphonsus
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 37
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Bike Comparisons- All $670

Looking into getting a bike less than $700 that would be great for riding in the city (not a full out mtb). I wanted a hybrid bike since I'm not that comfortable in riding the dropbar however I do want to be able to go on graveled path as well as having a front suspension. Here are the choices:

Giant Roam 2- https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/roam-2-disc-2020
Specialized Crosstrail- https://www.specialized.com/us/en/cr...=237264-157825
Trek Dual Sport 2- https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...?colorCode=red

These 3 bikes are all $670, which is in my budget however are they all equal in term of quality, probably 75% of the time will be riding on a asphalt road and sidewalk, other $25 would be just going to a park and riding on grass and going down a flatish bumpy gravel path.
Alphonsus is offline  
Old 08-18-19, 04:39 PM
  #2  
tkamd73 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Menomonee Falls, WI
Posts: 497

Bikes: 1984 Schwinn Supersport, 1988 Trek 400t, 1977 Trek TX900, 1982 Bianchi Champione del Mondo, 1988 Trek 400 Elance, 1978 Raleigh Supercourse, 1991 PDG Paramount OS

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 165 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 20 Posts
Same bike basically, all asian, pick the components and color you like best.
Tim
tkamd73 is offline  
Likes For tkamd73:
Old 08-18-19, 06:11 PM
  #3  
guachi
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Posts: 108
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Liked 34 Times in 27 Posts
They are all fine. The primary difference I see is the crank. The Trek and Specialized are both 48/38/28 and the Giant is 44/28.

My wife has a Verve 2 that, I think, has the same drivetrain as the Trek and it works fine. I ride it on the turbo trainer as it's easier than swapping my bike on and off. The biggest issue is that being 8-speed some of the jumps are a bit large. But the bike is 1/4 the price mine is.
guachi is offline  
Old 08-18-19, 07:14 PM
  #4  
rangie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 50
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 4 Posts
The suspension on all three will be completely worthless. Nothing more than a gimmick that only makes the bike heavier. Get a rigid fork.

If you need a softer ride go to a bigger lower pressure tire.
rangie is offline  
Old 08-18-19, 08:04 PM
  #5  
bcpriess
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 261

Bikes: Masi Giramondo, Trek 830 monstercross build, Raleigh Gran Sport, Lemond Tourmalet

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 109 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 6 Posts
Crosstrails are nice. I rode one for a few thousand miles when I was getting into bigger tires and really only quit because the flat bars weren't working with my wrists and ribcage muscles. Some folks will diss on any suspension that isn't built for hard core mtb action, but it's perfectly fine for rough roads and gravel.

Last edited by bcpriess; 08-18-19 at 08:08 PM.
bcpriess is offline  
Old 08-18-19, 08:11 PM
  #6  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 5,178

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 718 Post(s)
Liked 89 Times in 70 Posts
Originally Posted by rangie View Post
The suspension on all three will be completely worthless. Nothing more than a gimmick that only makes the bike heavier. Get a rigid fork.

If you need a softer ride go to a bigger lower pressure tire.
The Trek and Giant have lockout forks.
dedhed is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 07:58 AM
  #7  
xroadcharlie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Windsor Ontario, Canada
Posts: 165

Bikes: 2018 Giant Sedona

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 60 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by rangie View Post
The suspension on all three will be completely worthless. Nothing more than a gimmick that only makes the bike heavier. Get a rigid fork.

If you need a softer ride go to a bigger lower pressure tire.
That was my thinking when I bought my 2018 Giant Sedona with it's 50mm tires. And might be true with cheap Walmart bikes, But these bikes have decent suspension forks. And I agree that a GOOD wide tire is a smart first step to a smooth ride, Too wide however (over 50mm) will slow you down. Since much of my riding is on broken cement and rough ash fault on MUP and roads. My next bike WILL have suspension forks. But decent ones like on these bikes. When properly adjusted, Not only do they make for a more comfortable ride, but a faster one too as I can ride more quickly over rough patches that would otherwise be too punishing for anything less then a FAT bike, And they aren't even in the same league as the Roam in terms of speed. The Roam is so much faster.

I can deal with the small weight difference (perhaps 1 - 1.5% of total weight) and if they wear out in 10 years (many have lasted longer then that) I'll be due for a new bike before that anyway.

For serous roadies, Well that's another matter, But for most average cyclist's and commuters I would highly recommend them.

I'm considering buying a Giant Roam 3 for myself, since I am so pleased with my Sedona. Giant seems to have a knack for building high quality bikes even at budget prices. I prefer the mechanical disc brakes. I really don't want to deal with hydraulic fluid.

BTY, Take a close look at the Giant and Trek bikes the OP is considering. Those frames look almost identical except for the color, I wonder if this Trek bike is one of the many other bikes that Giant supplies frames for.

Last edited by xroadcharlie; 08-19-19 at 08:36 AM.
xroadcharlie is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 10:16 AM
  #8  
livedarklions
Je suis Snap Motomag
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 4,441

Bikes: Trek FX 3; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; "Motobecane" Fantom CX

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2249 Post(s)
Liked 672 Times in 411 Posts
The Roam 2 has better derailleurs. It's the combo I have on my 2017 FX 3 (they changed it this year), and I really like the shifting on that.

Can you test ride these?
livedarklions is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 10:49 AM
  #9  
GrainBrain
Senior Member
 
GrainBrain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Central Io-way
Posts: 1,308

Bikes: LeMond Zurich, Giant Talon 29er

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 678 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 50 Times in 34 Posts
Giant. Giant really offers a good price point and quality, when talking about LBS bikes. Bikes direct may be cheaper.
GrainBrain is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 02:12 PM
  #10  
TiHabanero
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,494
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 776 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 55 Posts
The bikes are all very similar in design and components. I like double cranks vs. triples, less hassle in the long run. The sus forks on these machines are either coil spring or elastomer. Not the best for performance, but for just lolly gagging along, they are fine. Lock them out when the bobbing gets to you. Can't go wrong with any of them, however my vote is the Giant due to the crank.
TiHabanero is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 02:24 PM
  #11  
tyrion
Senior Member
 
tyrion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 2,369

Bikes: Breezer Radar

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1254 Post(s)
Liked 130 Times in 83 Posts
The Giant looks like it has a slightly better drivetrain.
tyrion is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 06:43 PM
  #12  
rangie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 50
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by xroadcharlie View Post
That was my thinking when I bought my 2018 Giant Sedona with it's 50mm tires. And might be true with cheap Walmart bikes, But these bikes have decent suspension forks. And I agree that a GOOD wide tire is a smart first step to a smooth ride, Too wide however (over 50mm) will slow you down. Since much of my riding is on broken cement and rough ash fault on MUP and roads. My next bike WILL have suspension forks. But decent ones like on these bikes. When properly adjusted, Not only do they make for a more comfortable ride, but a faster one too as I can ride more quickly over rough patches that would otherwise be too punishing for anything less then a FAT bike, And they aren't even in the same league as the Roam in terms of speed. The Roam is so much faster.

I can deal with the small weight difference (perhaps 1 - 1.5% of total weight) and if they wear out in 10 years (many have lasted longer then that) I'll be due for a new bike before that anyway.
Not trying to get all bike snob but its a spring in a tube design with no damping and 28mm stations. That means poor adjust-ability, almost no small bump compliance, stiction, flex and unnecessary weight. Decent suspension forks cost more than these bikes do.
rangie is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 08:26 PM
  #13  
wyd
Member
 
wyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: PA
Posts: 38

Bikes: 2019 Specialized Crosstrail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
I just bought a Specialized Crosstrail like the one you mentioned and been riding for 2 weeks now. So far I have about 35 miles on it and really enjoy riding it. Only change I made for it to really feel good to me with a pretty inexpensive adjustable stem to raise the handlebars up some and added a set of Shimano M324 clipless pedals (I really didn't need to do this but got a great deal on them so decided to give it a try) but I was plenty happy with just the stem. Overall it's a really fun bike. I enjoy having hydraulic disk brakes as I have never owned a bike with disk brakes and really like them. I have no issues with the front suspension fork as it soaks up the smaller stuff and don't give me any bounce when really pedaling hard so for me I like having it as the little extra weight isn't a big deal to me.
wyd is offline  
Old 08-19-19, 09:02 PM
  #14  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 5,178

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 718 Post(s)
Liked 89 Times in 70 Posts
Originally Posted by rangie View Post
Not trying to get all bike snob but its a spring in a tube design with no damping and 28mm stations. That means poor adjust-ability, almost no small bump compliance, stiction, flex and unnecessary weight. Decent suspension forks cost more than these bikes do.
People buying 30# hybrids to ride around town just want to take some of the crap out of the crap pavement. They're not looking for the performance of a $1K Fox. They're riding through the grass in the park, not doing technical downhill. It'll be fine.
dedhed is offline  
Old 08-20-19, 06:47 AM
  #15  
xroadcharlie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Windsor Ontario, Canada
Posts: 165

Bikes: 2018 Giant Sedona

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 60 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 20 Posts
Actually those suspension forks Giant, and others use in many of their entry level bikes do have hydraulic damping if they have a hydraulic lockout. One leg is the hydraulic damper that may be adjustable or lock, The other a spring with an adjustable preload and sometimes lock. Admittedly not the best set-up for say jumping off rocks, But perfectly fine for recreational riders. Those expensive ones likely have an adjustable spring, either air or steel, and an adjustable damper on each leg, as well as more travel.

Even the best suspension forks still change the geometry of the bike some when they work. Again, fine for recreational riders and jumping off rocks, But if your in a tight road race group going down hill at 40 mph in a curve on 25mm tires and have to brake, This might not be good. They probably do have suspension systems that work in this situation, But are much less intrusive then the conventional suspension forks you see on hybrid or mountain bikes.

Of the 3 bike the op is considering, The Specialized Cross Trail has the best suspension fork that has variable damping that allows the fork to almost simulate a rigid fork on little bumps, Improving peddling efficiency (over conventional sus forks) and soaks up potholes when necessary. Pretty cool if it works as advertised.

Last edited by xroadcharlie; 08-20-19 at 06:52 AM.
xroadcharlie is offline  
Old 08-20-19, 07:58 AM
  #16  
livedarklions
Je suis Snap Motomag
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 4,441

Bikes: Trek FX 3; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; "Motobecane" Fantom CX

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2249 Post(s)
Liked 672 Times in 411 Posts
This might sound like a joke but I'm serious--at that price point, the first question I would ask to help you figure out if suspension is for you is whether you have to carry the bike up a flight of stairs on a regular basis (not unusual for urban cyclist). If so, whatever margin of comfort you're getting from the suspension might be outweighed (literally) by the extra burden on the stairs.
livedarklions is offline  
Old 08-20-19, 08:19 AM
  #17  
subgrade
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Rīga, Latvia
Posts: 290

Bikes: Focus Crater Lake

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 110 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 19 Posts
When my previous bike got stolen, I would use my girlfriends Dutch bike for commuting for a while. It had a rigid alloy fork and 35mm tires, and I was soon convinced that my next bike would have suspension fork - and it does. I have to carry it only for two flights of stairs each time I get back home, so the extra 2-3 pounds don't upset me much (especially since I've lost over 20 lbs myself since having this bike).

Don't listen to all the haters, a semi decent suspension fork on a hybrid (i.e. one with hydraulic lockout and damping) is nice to have. Means also that you can put some more pressure in your tires, which helps on smooth roads.
subgrade is offline  
Likes For subgrade:
Old 08-20-19, 08:30 AM
  #18  
himespau 
Senior Member
 
himespau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 10,992
Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1438 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 27 Posts
Originally Posted by TiHabanero View Post
The bikes are all very similar in design and components. I like double cranks vs. triples, less hassle in the long run. The sus forks on these machines are either coil spring or elastomer. Not the best for performance, but for just lolly gagging along, they are fine. Lock them out when the bobbing gets to you. Can't go wrong with any of them, however my vote is the Giant due to the crank.
And I prefer triple cranks to doubles for their versatility. Not sure OP would need a 48, but if s/he ever decides to put slicks on there and try to ride fast in traffic, it might be useful.
himespau is offline  
Old 08-20-19, 08:46 AM
  #19  
livedarklions
Je suis Snap Motomag
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 4,441

Bikes: Trek FX 3; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; "Motobecane" Fantom CX

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2249 Post(s)
Liked 672 Times in 411 Posts
Originally Posted by subgrade View Post
When my previous bike got stolen, I would use my girlfriends Dutch bike for commuting for a while. It had a rigid alloy fork and 35mm tires, and I was soon convinced that my next bike would have suspension fork - and it does. I have to carry it only for two flights of stairs each time I get back home, so the extra 2-3 pounds don't upset me much (especially since I've lost over 20 lbs myself since having this bike).

Don't listen to all the haters, a semi decent suspension fork on a hybrid (i.e. one with hydraulic lockout and damping) is nice to have. Means also that you can put some more pressure in your tires, which helps on smooth roads.
It's not a matter of "haters", it's a matter of saying "here's a factor to consider". A few pounds difference might not be a big deal to you, but not everyone has a good back, or they might be carrying other stuff they also have to get up the stairs at the end of a ride a lot. Some people live in five story walk-ups with stairs that have a bunch of close, hard to navigate with a burden corners. I did it all the time, but I was not a fan of carrying the bike up four stories of stairs when I lived in San Francisco, and was very grateful I was riding a relatively light hybrid at the time.

I actually have a point here--people usually only consider weight as a factor for speed, which is actually quite marginal. I think it's a bigger factor in handling the bike before and after the ride, and I think I've heard "it's too much trouble to get the bike downstairs and back" as a reason why people don't ride the bikes they have just about more than any other.

Glad your suspension worked out so well for you and good on you for losing the 20 pounds.
livedarklions is offline  
Old 08-20-19, 11:19 AM
  #20  
TiHabanero
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,494
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 776 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 55 Posts
" Pretty cool if it works as advertised."

Invariably the "technology" does not work as advertised. Not sure how it is possible to take a bit from 3 grand plus bikes and use it on a 700 dollar bike and get similar results. Not much room to work with at a 700 dollar price point. Works great as marketing hype, but in application, it is a Suntour NeX fork.
TiHabanero is offline  
Old 08-20-19, 11:53 AM
  #21  
xroadcharlie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Windsor Ontario, Canada
Posts: 165

Bikes: 2018 Giant Sedona

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 60 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by TiHabanero View Post
" Pretty cool if it works as advertised."

Invariably the "technology" does not work as advertised. Not sure how it is possible to take a bit from 3 grand plus bikes and use it on a 700 dollar bike and get similar results. Not much room to work with at a 700 dollar price point. Works great as marketing hype, but in application, it is a Suntour NeX fork.

Actually it's a "SR Suntour NEX fork w/ Fitness Brain technology"

I agree it isn't possible either to get the same damping results with these sus forks on a $700 bike as we would with $500 - $1,000 forks alone. But it is possible to manipulate the flow valve assembly in the damping cartridge in such a way that it will be less sensitive to small vibrations and peddling forces, While still responding to sudden hits, Like potholes.

While my guess is this nearly identical fork, Just fine tuned is probably more effective then the other two contenders, I wouldn't base a purchase of a Specialized CrossTrail because of that alone. And while it looks like a fine bike, I would still buy the Giant Roam based on the outstanding job they did with my 2018 Sedona. They really know how to build entry level bikes as well as the $5K + bikes. Also the sus forks on the Roam are a proven design used on many bikes. Not what you get on a $5,000 bike, But I think most folks would welcome the improved ride over the rigid forks like on my Sedona.
xroadcharlie is offline  
Old 08-20-19, 11:54 AM
  #22  
roccobike
Bike Junkie
 
roccobike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: South of Raleigh, North of New Hill, East of Harris Lake, NC
Posts: 9,568

Bikes: Specialized Tarmac, Specialized Roubaix, Giant OCR-C, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR, Stumpjumper Comp, 88 & 92Nishiki Ariel, 87 Centurion Ironman, 92 Paramount, 84 Nishiki Medalist

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
After reading the specs on all three, there is one important factor that I could not determine, but you, OP, can. Which bike shop offers the best service/mechanics? If that doesn't matter because you work on your own bikes, then it's totally your call. If the shop performs the work, pick the shop that you are most comfortable with because those three bikes are very close in their build, components and quality. Can't lose with any of them.
__________________
Roccobike BF Official Thread Terminator
roccobike is offline  
Old 08-20-19, 01:37 PM
  #23  
rangie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 50
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 4 Posts
How many of these entry level forks will ever be serviced? What owner at this price point is either going to pay a shop to rebuild this turd or have the know how to diy it? Can you even find a seal kit?

A year from now it will be frozen solid or close enough.

For the real world use the build on these bikes really does suck. It would be much better to have your money go almost anywhere besides the fork . Better rims and tires would be my first choice. The cheap Shimano hydraulic brakes would be awesome. A wide range 1x8 drivetrain built with a heavy but bulletproof e-bike casette would eliminate 90% of the annoyance casual riders have with their bikes.
rangie is offline  
Old 08-20-19, 05:09 PM
  #24  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 5,178

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 718 Post(s)
Liked 89 Times in 70 Posts
Originally Posted by rangie View Post
How many of these entry level forks will ever be serviced? What owner at this price point is either going to pay a shop to rebuild this turd or have the know how to diy it? Can you even find a seal kit?
A year from now it will be frozen solid or close enough.
Such gloom & doom. Really? Yeah, they'll never get serviced. I have a number of entry level hybrids/Mt bikes here (because kids) with cheap suspension forks and not a single one is frozen solid and non have been serviced even those those kids are old enough to have kids. . Even my Raleigh hybrid which has seen probably 10K miles of commuting in all kinds of weather works just fine.

We get it, you don't like cheap hybrids with suspension forks. The fact is thousands (millions?) are sold every year and are still on the road. People like them and buy them, so manufacturers will continue to spec them. For most users commuting in the city and puttering around the park with an occasional gravel trail or camping trip they perform as intended.
dedhed is offline  
Likes For dedhed:
Old 08-20-19, 07:32 PM
  #25  
Alphonsus
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 37
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Would like to mention, this bike is not meant for offroading like a forest trail or something like that, primarily for urban commute, which ranges usually 3-10 miles in the city. If I want a bike for actual mountains and dedicated bike trails I'll probably would move my budget up to $1000. My question is bikes like gravel and cyclocross don't have suspension yet can handle 2 feet drops and things like that, so do I not need a bike with front suspensions?
Alphonsus is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.