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Clincher vs Tubular tires, Which is more Puncture Resistant & Cost Effective to Fix?

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Clincher vs Tubular tires, Which is more Puncture Resistant & Cost Effective to Fix?

Old 08-23-19, 04:50 PM
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Clincher vs Tubular tires, Which is more Puncture Resistant & Cost Effective to Fix?

I will be riding bicycle to work and home a lot. I will be getting my road bike fixed up or buy a new one. Tubular is tubeless right? And the Clincher is the one with a tube inside the tire.. Which one is more puncture resistant? and more cost effective to fix? And which one is easier to patch up flat tire?

Thanks
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Old 08-23-19, 08:05 PM
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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tubular_tyre
Both tubular and clinchers traditionally have inner tubes.
A more recent type is the tubeless tire. Don’t think the term clincher is used much these days.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tubeless_tire
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Old 08-23-19, 09:07 PM
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Thanks for clearing that up for me..
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Old 08-24-19, 01:50 PM
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I think you are asking about the difference between tubeless and standard clinchers. Tubular is something else.

Puncture resistance depends mainly on how thick or belted the tire is, but also on the size. Larger tires get fewer flats, so if getting a new bike, look for one that will fit them.

Tubeless is more complicated but good where there are lots of thorns, as the small punctures are stopped by the sealant in the tire. Problems beyond that are harder to deal with due to sealant mess, sometimes tight-fitting tires, sometimes hard to inflate initially, and the tires tend to be more expensive.

Regular tires with tubes are easy to fix if you get a flat and the stuff is all readily available, so the default choice more most folks.
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Old 08-25-19, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post
I think you are asking about the difference between tubeless and standard clinchers. Tubular is something else.

Puncture resistance depends mainly on how thick or belted the tire is, but also on the size. Larger tires get fewer flats, so if getting a new bike, look for one that will fit them.

Tubeless is more complicated but good where there are lots of thorns, as the small punctures are stopped by the sealant in the tire. Problems beyond that are harder to deal with due to sealant mess, sometimes tight-fitting tires, sometimes hard to inflate initially, and the tires tend to be more expensive.

Regular tires with tubes are easy to fix if you get a flat and the stuff is all readily available, so the default choice more most folks.
Thank you. I think I'm gonna stick with clincher with good puncture resistant tires..
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Old 08-25-19, 08:35 AM
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FWIW, after 40 years, I went from clinchers to tubeless. I'm not going back.

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Old 08-25-19, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post
Tubeless is more complicated but good where there are lots of thorns, as the small punctures are stopped by the sealant in the tire. Problems beyond that are harder to deal with due to sealant mess, sometimes tight-fitting tires, sometimes hard to inflate initially, and the tires tend to be more expensive.
This is an excellent summary of tubeless. If you live in an area where flats are not a common occurrence, stick to tubes. Cheaper, less futzing. But I live in the thorn capital of the world-- I rode 21 miles on Friday, and pulled nine thorn tips out of my tires, 4 of which bubbled sealant. So with tubes, I would have gotten at least four flats. Tubeless here by pure necessity.

And every day I wish the tires were cheaper.
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Old 08-25-19, 09:10 AM
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Thanks for the insight guys. Tubeless tires I'm intrigued... I just checked on tire pressure for both clincher and tubeless tires for road bikes and there is huge difference between the two. Clincher @ 80- 120 psi, Tubeless @ 26- 30 psi. Are you saying it will be THAT much easier to inflate the tubeless tires via portable hand pump?
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Old 08-25-19, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post

Tubeless is more complicated but good where there are lots of thorns, as the small punctures are stopped by the sealant in the tire. Problems beyond that are harder to deal with due to sealant mess, sometimes tight-fitting tires, sometimes hard to inflate initially, and the tires tend to be more expensive.

Regular tires with tubes are easy to fix if you get a flat and the stuff is all readily available, so the default choice more most folks.
Al tubeless are not created equal. My experience with Mavic does not reflect the difficulties most tubeless wheels/tires have. GCN seems to agree.
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Old 08-25-19, 12:52 PM
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FWIW, I’m running my first set of road tubeless. In terms of feel and weight they are on a par with tubulars and the best clinchers, but I haven’t found sealant to be fully effective at eliminating flats. I’ve had one flat that set up a slow leak that wouldn’t seal from sealant alone, and another one that left me on the side of the road installing a tube.
To be fair, clinchers would have flatted in both cases, and installing a tube was only a little messier than repairing a clincher flat. But the hassle factor is higher, given the necessity to use a compressor to seat the tubeless and the mess of sealant.
The jury is still out for me on whether I’ll continue to run tubeless when I’ve worn these out.
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Old 08-26-19, 05:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Cheez View Post
Thanks for the insight guys. Tubeless tires I'm intrigued... I just checked on tire pressure for both clincher and tubeless tires for road bikes and there is huge difference between the two. Clincher @ 80- 120 psi, Tubeless @ 26- 30 psi. Are you saying it will be THAT much easier to inflate the tubeless tires via portable hand pump?
You're not comparing tires of the same width. Tubeless tires of the same width do get run at lower pressure than tubed tires, but not that much lower. 80-120 PSI sounds like the pressure range for narrow road clincher tires, i.e. 23-25mm at most. 26-30 PSI is the pressure range I'd expect for cyclocross or gravel tires of at least 32mm width.

I don't actually run road tubeless yet. For a 25-28mm road tire, I run 65-70 PSI with tubes. I'd expect to drop that by 5-10 PSI for a tubeless version - someone please correct me if this is wrong.

My impression is that for mountain biking and gravel biking, run tubeless. It's very clearly an improvement over tubed setups. For road biking, the tradeoffs don't clearly favor tubeless yet.
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Old 08-26-19, 05:24 AM
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Originally Posted by weiwentg View Post
My impression is that for mountain biking and gravel biking, run tubeless. It's very clearly an improvement over tubed setups. For road biking, the tradeoffs don't clearly favor tubeless yet.
Yeah. I have been riding road tubeless for many years and am torn. I love the ride quality, but...Despite using top of the line tires, I have had a few punctures that would not seal above 60 psi or even less, which is too low for me. Moreover, it can be difficult to put in an emergency tube when using some rim/tire combinations. Had to do it this spring. Ended up with a bulge by the valve stem that caused a wobble. Second time that happened. Fortunately, I was able to limp the 6 miles back to my car.
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Old 08-26-19, 06:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Cheez View Post
Thanks for the insight guys. Tubeless tires I'm intrigued... I just checked on tire pressure for both clincher and tubeless tires for road bikes and there is huge difference between the two. Clincher @ 80- 120 psi, Tubeless @ 26- 30 psi. Are you saying it will be THAT much easier to inflate the tubeless tires via portable hand pump?
As another poster noted, those comparisons are not between tires of the same size and purpose.

For road tubeless, you CAN run tubeless lower than tubes, but the differences won't be that dramatic. The big difference is that if you run very low you don't have to worry about pinch flats.

As a specific example, I run 25mm clinchers with latex tubes at 70-75 lbs, and run 25mm tubeless at the same pressure. If I am racing in the rain, I'll drop clinchers to 65, but I will drop tubeless to 60. I did finish a ride on tubeless at 40 psi (I had a slow leak), but I wouldn't start a ride that low.
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Old 08-26-19, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
Yeah. I have been riding road tubeless for many years and am torn. I love the ride quality, but...Despite using top of the line tires, I have had a few punctures that would not seal above 60 psi or even less, which is too low for me.
Which sealant are you using? My friends running road tubeless are all swearing by Orange sealant, and I'm running it in my rear tire. I was running Stan's, but had a flat that, like yours, wouldn't hold pressure. Even if I'm running my tires at 70psi, I'm not comfortable unless they hold 100 psi or better.
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Old 08-26-19, 10:58 AM
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Originally Posted by bbbean View Post
Which sealant are you using? My friends running road tubeless are all swearing by Orange sealant, and I'm running it in my rear tire. I was running Stan's, but had a flat that, like yours, wouldn't hold pressure. Even if I'm running my tires at 70psi, I'm not comfortable unless they hold 100 psi or better.
Can't remember what's in there now, but I have used Orange Seal with the same problem. One time I had an unknown puncture with Orange Seal. Didn't discover it until a day later. Some had sprayed on the seat stays and left faint stains on my Cerakote finish.
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Old 08-26-19, 02:06 PM
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I run road tubeless at my 369 pounds in Goat head (nasty thorns) territory. I use the Maxxis Padrone 700 x 25mm tires at 110 psi, and I seat the bead when I install the tires with the Giant "Control Tank" which is a reservoir I can fill with my bike pump, and when I have 160psi in the reservoir I do an air dump into the tire to seat the bead.

Yes I have had flats where I needed to install a tube, and yes I always carry a tube, but I have also had punctures that I was able to get sealed and was able to keep riding.
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Old 08-26-19, 11:10 PM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
This is an excellent summary of tubeless. If you live in an area where flats are not a common occurrence, stick to tubes. Cheaper, less futzing. But I live in the thorn capital of the world-- I rode 21 miles on Friday, and pulled nine thorn tips out of my tires, 4 of which bubbled sealant. So with tubes, I would have gotten at least four flats. Tubeless here by pure necessity.

And every day I wish the tires were cheaper.
If i were getting 9 thorns a day, I'd consider getting a solid tire for short rides (under 20 miles). Bonus, solid tires roll faster than pneumatic tires
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Old 08-27-19, 06:38 AM
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As with so many things, it depends! I've been thinking about switching to tubeless recently. But then I realised that punctures aren't really a problem for me. However, riding regularly in London I sometimes have to do emergency stops, and it's very hard not to lock up your rear wheel when you do. When that happens you tend to tear a big chunk of the outer tyre off, exposing the cords. So I thought I'd rather stick with tubes as the tyres are cheaper - at the moment. That may well change, though, as tubeless is only going to grow in popularity.
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Old 08-27-19, 07:32 AM
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My solution: pay a bike shop to deal with mounting tubeless tires, reap the benefits on the road. Once you ride quality tubeless 28s at 85 psi, you're not going back.
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Old 08-27-19, 07:52 AM
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Is it very difficult to install tubeless tires myself? Is it easy to mess up the tire if the installation is not perfect? If that's the case then I'm sticking with the clincher...but it sounds like it's easier to patch up flat on the tubeless... so I should take them to the bike shop to do the install job?
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Old 08-27-19, 07:59 AM
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There's definitely a learning curve for installing tubeless. Now that I've done it hundreds of times, I find it no more difficult or time consuming than mounting a normal clincher. But there have definitely been some tire wrestling matches in the past.

For where I ride, the difference between a clincher and tubeless is that in many cases, I have to get the tubeless on the rim just once. I've had numerous tires go their entire tread lives without ever having to break a bead-- and the goatheads here are so bad, you see them sticking to the outsides of car tires in parking lots.
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Old 08-27-19, 08:21 AM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
There's definitely a learning curve for installing tubeless. Now that I've done it hundreds of times, I find it no more difficult or time consuming than mounting a normal clincher. But there have definitely been some tire wrestling matches in the past.

For where I ride, the difference between a clincher and tubeless is that in many cases, I have to get the tubeless on the rim just once. I've had numerous tires go their entire tread lives without ever having to break a bead-- and the goatheads here are so bad, you see them sticking to the outsides of car tires in parking lots.
That's a good info. Thank you
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Old 08-27-19, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by bbbean View Post
But the hassle factor is higher, given the necessity to use a compressor to seat the tubeless and the mess of sealant.
With Mavic UST you use a floor pump.
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Old 08-27-19, 06:40 PM
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I bought a set of Mavic Ksyrium Elite USTs. Inflate them with your floor pump. Ride away.
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Old 08-27-19, 11:38 PM
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Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
If i were getting 9 thorns a day, I'd consider getting a solid tire for short rides (under 20 miles). Bonus, solid tires roll faster than pneumatic tires

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