Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 07-31-19, 03:51 PM
  #3451  
iflyskyhigh
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Bikes: 2002 Serotta Legend Ti

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Afternoon

Just sitting here sweating my ass off in AZ and stumbled across this forum while looking for answers to burning questions.

I'm 6-04 and 228 pounds. I could probably be 10 pounds lighter if I starved myself, but I love BBQ so that's not gonna happen.

I ride 3-5 days week, maybe 100-150 miles on a custom built 2002 Serotta Legend Ti with the original Campagnolo Record 10 (albeit several cassettes, chains, and wheel sets later).

My old ass, but awesome bike is part of what brought me here. I'm trying to decide between a pretty major component upgrade or whole bike replacement. Not really a replacement cause I'm never getting rid of the Serotta, but more of a new addition. (to which forum should I direct this discussion?)

Bikes for big guys have come a long way in the past 17 years so I'm hoping if I go that route there will be some input to be had here.
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Old 07-31-19, 07:34 PM
  #3452  
ChuckD6421 
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Originally Posted by iflyskyhigh View Post
Just sitting here sweating my ass off in AZ and stumbled across this forum while looking for answers to burning questions.

I'm 6-04 and 228 pounds. I could probably be 10 pounds lighter if I starved myself, but I love BBQ so that's not gonna happen.

I ride 3-5 days week, maybe 100-150 miles on a custom built 2002 Serotta Legend Ti with the original Campagnolo Record 10 (albeit several cassettes, chains, and wheel sets later).

My old ass, but awesome bike is part of what brought me here. I'm trying to decide between a pretty major component upgrade or whole bike replacement. Not really a replacement cause I'm never getting rid of the Serotta, but more of a new addition. (to which forum should I direct this discussion?)

Bikes for big guys have come a long way in the past 17 years so I'm hoping if I go that route there will be some input to be had here.
Hi sky, welcome. And welcome to the others recently who found us and didn't get a proper welcome.

Your bike was built not far from where I live.

If you ride with decent form, that Serotta should be fine, even if it's got race wheels. I'm 6'1" now trending down toward 220 and have been riding a 2013 Trek Domane 5.2 for the past several years. This bike came with 24 spokes in the rear and 18 in the front and I put several thousand miles on paved rural roads before I built up another pair of wheels, mostly because I prefer tubulars. A large amount of that time I was actually pushing 240 nekkid. Throwing on all the winter gear needed for a Northeast winter I was probably well into 250 pounds. Did that many times.

Key will be (assuming proper frame fit which for you is probably 60" to 62") how you ride it. As I've said here before, ride light on it, meaning when you can't avoid bumps, get your arse up off the seat and make sure you're weight is centered fore-to-aft and on your pedals.

(The following may be known to you already, but I'm putting it here for others as well. I've built a lot of wheels including the all the ones I raced, toured and commuted on with 0 failures and very little tweaking once built).

Also make sure your spokes are evenly tensioned. If it were me, I'd first pluck each one like a guitar string and see if any seem way "out of tune" (Sheldon Brown has a page on musically tensioning a wheel). If you get a wide range of tones I'd loosen up each spoke till it separates from the nipple, swipe it with some grease and thread it back on a known number of turns (3 or 4). After you've done one revolution of the wheel (start at the valve opening so you remember where you started), then start turning them down a turn or two till you've made another rotation around the wheel, assess their tightness, and continue again a single turn to each and go on till you they're about right. At that point you can either use a spoke tension gauge, or go back to Sheldon's page for the musical notes you should be shooting for (remember the drive side spokes on the rear wheel are tighter than the non-drive side). Consistent spoke tension is critical to wheel strength. Once you've evened up the tension then start the actual truing. Since rims are not perfectly true to begin with, once you've then finished truing them you'll end up with some variation in tension, but at least you've started from even ground and the variations shouldn't be to radical. If you do find you need to overly tighten or loosen spokes, you should probably be looking to replace the rim.
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Old 08-01-19, 11:21 AM
  #3453  
iflyskyhigh
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Bikes: 2002 Serotta Legend Ti

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Wow, thanks for the introduction.

Tried to put a pic of the bike in, but it wouldn't let me till I have 10 posts.

Yes my Serotta is effectively a 63cm with a very traditional geometry. I built it when I was working at a bike shop while going through flight school back in the early 2000's. It's a Ti frame with carbon seat stays and fork.

I love the bike and will never get rid of it no matter what I do. It doesn't have the 53/39 on it anymore. I went with a Chorus 11 speed (which works fine with 10 speed by the way) 50/34 years ago. I sold the 53/39 record chainring, but now wish I'd have kept it so I'd have the set. For what I have no idea.

I do all my own wrenching, except for wheels. I don't have the tools needed, but may at some point.

I originally had mavic ksyrium sl's that lasted from when I put them on in 2002 till about 3-4 years ago. They were rebuilt a couple times, but where amazing wheels. 3-4 years ago I had a buddy build me some wheels with h plus son archetype rims and DT Swiss 350 hubs. They have been great wheels so far.

I think what I'm going to do for now is put a Chorus 12 speed group set on, along with a new bar and stem (still riding the original ITM bar and stem). I put a Selle SMP saddle on a couple months ago and love it. And with the relatively new wheels, it should be good for another 20 years.

Maybe I'll gave a new bike in the next few years to see what all the fuss is about.
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Old 08-03-19, 05:36 PM
  #3454  
dk63
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dk63 I'm new

Hello, I will be turning 63 this Sunday. I stand 5 foot 10 inches tall 330 pounds
I have not been on a petal bike since 1984; last bike was a 15 speed japan made racer that I rode while in Korea.
My question is more or less any recommendations on type or style of bikes.
Being short fat and bald has it set backs but even that can change.
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Old 08-20-19, 03:26 PM
  #3455  
Halloween Jack
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Can't remember if I did this when I joined, whenever that was, but here we go: 6'1/2", 280 lb. or thereabouts. I ride a twenty-year-old Specialized Crossroads city bike and a Nashbar no-name road bike, and have completed five RAGBRAIs, plus over half of two more, and a few centuries, plus the usual just farting around on the bike. (A local bike group has an annual ride called Tour de Taco that's a lot of fun.) Gets me out of the house and helps deal with the 'beetus.
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Old 08-20-19, 07:12 PM
  #3456  
dk63
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Nice meeting you Halloween Jack
Tour de Taco sounds good to me, after I get my wheel bearings straighten out and my leg strength up to speed, finding a ride group will be next on the list. So far so good I'm doing about 4 - 5 mile jots in the morning. Still working tune my bike a little more, still working on bar positioning I'm getting pain in my right thumb and palm area most likely artritise but what can I say I'am 63
Stay two up and safe
dk63
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