Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Winter Cycling
Reload this Page >

Any way to warm up a bike faster when you bring it inside?

Notices
Winter Cycling Don't let snow and ice discourage you this winter. The key element to year-round cycling is proper attire! Check out this winter cycling forum to chat with other ice bike fanatics.

Any way to warm up a bike faster when you bring it inside?

Old 01-21-20, 05:09 PM
  #1  
bikerbobbbb
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 536
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 110 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Any way to warm up a bike faster when you bring it inside?

My bike's out in the cold, long enough to adjust/match that outside temperature.

If I bring my bike inside, is there any way to warm the bike up faster than just letting it sit? I'm trying to think of ideas. Maybe a space heater, but that might start causing more wear compared to just letting it warm up on its own. And I don't have a space heater....

It's an aluminum bike too. I've been experimenting with bringing (ie sneaking) it inside for about an hour before I need it. That seems to work fairly well. Outside cold, inside for an hour or so, and it's much nicer than the outside temps for sure.

Just fishing for ideas....
bikerbobbbb is offline  
Old 01-21-20, 05:33 PM
  #2  
wolfchild
Senior Member
 
wolfchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Posts: 5,975

Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1642 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 302 Times in 169 Posts
Why warm up a bike ??….What's the point ??
wolfchild is offline  
Likes For wolfchild:
Old 01-21-20, 05:58 PM
  #3  
jon c. 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 3,837
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1041 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 97 Times in 64 Posts
Bikes are people too?
jon c. is offline  
Old 01-21-20, 06:47 PM
  #4  
caloso
Senior Member
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 38,706

Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper

Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2104 Post(s)
Liked 601 Times in 334 Posts
This is a joke, right?
caloso is offline  
Old 01-21-20, 07:32 PM
  #5  
bikerbobbbb
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 536
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 110 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
It's not a joke. The bike is outside so it's literally ice cold. You sit on a cold bike seat and then grip cold handlebars. There's definitely a difference riding a bike that's sitting outside vs. one that's kept inside -- Cold butt and fingers go numb faster gripping the cold handlebars. Add in having to squeeze the handlebars more if I wear thicker gloves when it's colder out or when it's icier out and I grip the handlebars more. So if I bring the bike inside before I ride it when I'm stuck having to leave it outside, that helps. I'm wondering if I can get it to room temperature faster though.

A fan blowing air over it. Maybe an electric blanket. Laying something on it that's warmed. Putting it by something like an old boiler or oven.

But if it goes from an outside temp and then heats up faster than just sitting there at room temperature, I wonder what might do, in terms of the faster temperature change and also if that's repeated for wearing things. I would think even without speeding up the temperature change process that it's going to wear things out a little faster than if I kept the bike inside all the time and only had it outside while riding it.
bikerbobbbb is offline  
Old 01-21-20, 07:37 PM
  #6  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 7,731

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn

Mentioned: 116 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4303 Post(s)
Liked 814 Times in 492 Posts
Unless you're somehow crammed into an almost impossibly small space, I dunno... keep the bike inside? Our house is not large by any measure, but I could easily clear a space to store a bike if the need were to arise.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Likes For DrIsotope:
Old 01-21-20, 08:21 PM
  #7  
u235
Senior Member
 
u235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 1,039
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 384 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 45 Posts
Aluminum bike right? Do you have an electric dryer? Disconnect your electric dryer power cord and cut one of the wires. Attach one end of the cut wire to the chainstay and the other end to the right handlebar as close to the end as possible. Turn the dryer on but stay away from the bike. The dryer won't run because it's not plugged in but it has to be on. In about an hour the bike will be just about the same temperature as the air in the house. The earlier in the week you do this the better. Towards the end of the week it does not work as good. When you are done reconnect the wires and plug the dryer back in. You can limit wear on the bike by hooking the wires up the other way the next time to even things out.

Last edited by u235; 01-21-20 at 08:31 PM.
u235 is offline  
Likes For u235:
Old 01-21-20, 08:29 PM
  #8  
bobwysiwyg 
Senior Member
 
bobwysiwyg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: 961' 42.28° N, 83.78° W (A2)
Posts: 2,127

Bikes: Mongoose Selous, Trek DS

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 826 Post(s)
Liked 173 Times in 111 Posts
Originally Posted by bikerbobbbb View Post
It's not a joke. The bike is outside so it's literally ice cold. You sit on a cold bike seat and then grip cold handlebars. There's definitely a difference riding a bike that's sitting outside vs. one that's kept inside -- Cold butt and fingers go numb faster gripping the cold handlebars. Add in having to squeeze the handlebars more if I wear thicker gloves when it's colder out or when it's icier out and I grip the handlebars more. So if I bring the bike inside before I ride it when I'm stuck having to leave it outside, that helps. I'm wondering if I can get it to room temperature faster though.

A fan blowing air over it. Maybe an electric blanket. Laying something on it that's warmed. Putting it by something like an old boiler or oven.

But if it goes from an outside temp and then heats up faster than just sitting there at room temperature, I wonder what might do, in terms of the faster temperature change and also if that's repeated for wearing things. I would think even without speeding up the temperature change process that it's going to wear things out a little faster than if I kept the bike inside all the time and only had it outside while riding it.
Sounds like a bit of impatience, and this is from someone who lacks patience. Ask my wife.
__________________
"Skepticism is the first step in critical thinking." -- Me
bobwysiwyg is offline  
Old 01-21-20, 09:20 PM
  #9  
2manybikes
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 17,829

Bikes: 2 many

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1129 Post(s)
Liked 92 Times in 61 Posts
If it's cold outside and the bike is cold you bring into say 68 degrees, something like a bike will get condensation on it. The bigger the temperature difference the more condensation there is. The faster you warm it up the worse it is. If you need to go outside when there is still condensation on something it will turn to ice if it's cold enough.
If you get condensation in the frame you can't see it. if you get some in the cables it can freeze the cable solid if there was not enough time to dry the bike out.
If you bring the bike inside let it warm up slowly, and let it dry all night long. I've seen frozen cables from this a couple of times. I was deer hunting when it was about 20f, brought the shotgun inside, leaned it against the wall and the water was pouring off the weapon.
Or leave the bike in the cold. maybe a garage, or a shed, and wear the right clothing. I do it all the time.
2manybikes is offline  
Likes For 2manybikes:
Old 01-21-20, 10:02 PM
  #10  
308jerry
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 268
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 111 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 32 Posts
Originally Posted by u235 View Post
Aluminum bike right? Do you have an electric dryer? Disconnect your electric dryer power cord and cut one of the wires. Attach one end of the cut wire to the chainstay and the other end to the right handlebar as close to the end as possible. Turn the dryer on but stay away from the bike. The dryer won't run because it's not plugged in but it has to be on. In about an hour the bike will be just about the same temperature as the air in the house. The earlier in the week you do this the better. Towards the end of the week it does not work as good. When you are done reconnect the wires and plug the dryer back in. You can limit wear on the bike by hooking the wires up the other way the next time to even things out.

​​​​​​ Oh my......
308jerry is online now  
Old 01-21-20, 10:07 PM
  #11  
2manybikes
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 17,829

Bikes: 2 many

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1129 Post(s)
Liked 92 Times in 61 Posts
Originally Posted by 308jerry View Post
​​​​​​ Oh my......
I think it would be safer to build a bonfire in the living room and throw it in the fire. Just use a stick to get it out of the fire.
Bonus `~ you can make smores while cooking the bike.
2manybikes is offline  
Likes For 2manybikes:
Old 01-21-20, 10:12 PM
  #12  
Senrab62
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 326
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 78 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
Unless you're somehow crammed into an almost impossibly small space, I dunno... keep the bike inside? Our house is not large by any measure, but I could easily clear a space to store a bike if the need were to arise.
This plus look for a hook or system to store it vertically to reduce footprint of bike..
Senrab62 is offline  
Old 01-21-20, 10:18 PM
  #13  
sweeks
Senior Member
 
sweeks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 1,316

Bikes: Airborne "Carpe Diem", Motobecane "Mirage", Trek 6000, Strida 2, Dahon "Helios XL", Dahon "Mu XL", Tern "Verge S11i"

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 565 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 46 Posts
Originally Posted by 2manybikes View Post
Or leave the bike in the cold. maybe a garage, or a shed, and wear the right clothing. I do it all the time.
This ^^. With proper clothing and the heat you'll be generating within minutes, you won't notice the cold.
I commute by bike. My commuter sits in the garage where, lately, it's been in the teens. I can't imagine wasting the time to bring the bike in every night.
sweeks is offline  
Likes For sweeks:
Old 01-21-20, 10:44 PM
  #14  
WGB
WGB
 
WGB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Niagara Region
Posts: 1,553

Bikes: League Fuji, Ross Aristocrat and soon to be a Takara Tribute

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 441 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 39 Times in 34 Posts
Have a quick release for the seat. Bring it inside and keep warm. Reattach in the morning.
WGB is offline  
Likes For WGB:
Old 01-21-20, 11:10 PM
  #15  
HerrKaLeun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,604

Bikes: Giant Toughroad SLR1 and Motobecane Sturgis NX

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 763 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 78 Times in 67 Posts
Bicycles are people too. Like corporations....

If you have high ceilings, attach the bike up there since warm air rises.

Or give it a hot tub in the hot tub.

Stand it over the furnace vents. If you don't have a furnace, connect the hydronic heating supply to the head tube, and BOTH chainstays to the hydronic return line. If you only connect one chainstay, you get uneven heating of the frame and it will bend. That is how 126mm rearspacing happens.

Start a pottery hobby and put the kiln where the bike sleeps. have a batch of pottery ready to be burned before the bike comes home.
HerrKaLeun is online now  
Old 01-22-20, 10:19 AM
  #16  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 5,634

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1113 Post(s)
Liked 170 Times in 117 Posts
Getting the literally ice-cold bike inside is going to make your hands painfully cold. You might consider wearing the gloves you put on to bring the bike inside while you're actually riding the bike.

Similar process holds for the saddle, butt I'll leave that to your imagination.
pdlamb is online now  
Old 01-23-20, 02:58 PM
  #17  
ironwood
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Boston area
Posts: 1,903

Bikes: 1984 Bridgestone 400 1985Univega nouevo sport 650b conversion 1993b'stone RBT 1985 Schwinn Tempo

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 472 Post(s)
Liked 67 Times in 46 Posts
Originally Posted by u235 View Post
Aluminum bike right? Do you have an electric dryer? Disconnect your electric dryer power cord and cut one of the wires. Attach one end of the cut wire to the chainstay and the other end to the right handlebar as close to the end as possible. Turn the dryer on but stay away from the bike. The dryer won't run because it's not plugged in but it has to be on. In about an hour the bike will be just about the same temperature as the air in the house. The earlier in the week you do this the better. Towards the end of the week it does not work as good. When you are done reconnect the wires and plug the dryer back in. You can limit wear on the bike by hooking the wires up the other way the next time to even things out.
I'm surprised that you didn't suggest a small nuclear reactor.
ironwood is offline  
Old 01-24-20, 03:44 PM
  #18  
Buglady
Senior Member
 
Buglady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 2,383

Bikes: 2018 Ghost Square Trekking B2.8 e-bike; 2015 MEC Cote gravel/touring bike; 1985 Boyes-Rosser tourer, now outfitted as Winter Trundle-bike

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by ironwood View Post
I'm surprised that you didn't suggest a small nuclear reactor.
No, that's for the e-bike motor
Buglady is offline  
Old 01-24-20, 05:06 PM
  #19  
wolfchild
Senior Member
 
wolfchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Posts: 5,975

Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1642 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 302 Times in 169 Posts
Somebody need to invent heated handlebars and heated saddles.
wolfchild is offline  
Old 01-25-20, 08:05 AM
  #20  
BobbyG
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 4,731

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International

Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 987 Post(s)
Liked 447 Times in 231 Posts
bikerbobbbb I commute year round down to 5F. My three bikes sit outside in an unheated shed. Below 15F the bikes sometimes feel kinda stiff for a couple of minutes, and using the pump to top off the AirZound air-horn can be a little tough. Also, the cable locks can be stiff. But I've never felt like the seat or bars are cold. On the other hand, I've been wrapping my bars in 3/4" pipe insulation for a dozen years due to hand issues. And each bike has a padded gel-seat cover...well, my snow bike has an actual padded gel seat (with springs). That may have something to do with it.
BobbyG is offline  
Old 01-25-20, 10:23 AM
  #21  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 38,565

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 464 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6182 Post(s)
Liked 678 Times in 458 Posts
Originally Posted by WGB View Post
Have a quick release for the seat. Bring it inside and keep warm. Reattach in the morning.
This reminds me of the story my friend told me. On his winter break, he would stay with his grandparents in rural New Hampshire. They had an outhouse rather than an indoor toilet. The seats were kept above the fireplace inside. He would take one of the seats (I don't know why there were two) off the wall and carry it out to the outhouse. He said it was actually a fond memory.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 03-07-20, 08:49 PM
  #22  
Pouhana
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: South Bay
Posts: 43

Bikes: Fuji Nevada 29, Trek 820, SE BIG Mountain 29

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by bikerbobbbb View Post
It's not a joke. The bike is outside so it's literally ice cold. You sit on a cold bike seat and then grip cold handlebars. There's definitely a difference riding a bike that's sitting outside vs. one that's kept inside -- Cold butt and fingers go numb faster gripping the cold handlebars. Add in having to squeeze the handlebars more if I wear thicker gloves when it's colder out or when it's icier out and I grip the handlebars more. So if I bring the bike inside before I ride it when I'm stuck having to leave it outside, that helps. I'm wondering if I can get it to room temperature faster though.

A fan blowing air over it. Maybe an electric blanket. Laying something on it that's warmed. Putting it by something like an old boiler or oven.

But if it goes from an outside temp and then heats up faster than just sitting there at room temperature, I wonder what might do, in terms of the faster temperature change and also if that's repeated for wearing things. I would think even without speeding up the temperature change process that it's going to wear things out a little faster than if I kept the bike inside all the time and only had it outside while riding it.
I have same problem except for no cold saddle complaints.

I bought a Eddie Bauer hand warmer power bank device. I turn it on and put it in a pocket.I grab it in my pocket and it quickly warms the palm of my gloved hands.
I have a very short cord to re-charge my Garmin which only lasts 8 hours and I have a headlight that plugs into the power bank.

For the seat I suggest a reusable warmer/ice pack Just warm it in microwave and hold it onto the seat for a minute. In the summer freeze it and leave with it in the pocket of your Camelback
Pouhana is offline  
Old 03-08-20, 10:12 AM
  #23  
Daniel4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,351

Bikes: Sekini 1979 ten speed racer

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 880 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 114 Times in 82 Posts
I thought the World Naked Bike Ride took place in the summer.

If your bike seat and handlebars are ice cold, put on a pair of long johns and wear gloves.
Daniel4 is offline  
Old 03-11-20, 06:14 PM
  #24  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 22,049

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 108 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2968 Post(s)
Liked 414 Times in 292 Posts
Originally Posted by 2manybikes View Post
If it's cold outside and the bike is cold you bring into say 68 degrees, something like a bike will get condensation on it. The bigger the temperature difference the more condensation there is. The faster you warm it up the worse it is. If you need to go outside when there is still condensation on something it will turn to ice if it's cold enough.
While I agree that bring a bike into the house to warm it up is a little silly, condensation isn’t a problem. The outside of the bike is painted so any water that condenses there isn’t going to do anything...not that much water is going to condense on it to begin with. Water inside the tubes might be a problem but there simply isn’t much water inside the air in the tubes and there isn’t much air for the water to be in the first place. I haven’t done the calculations but I would estimate 500mL to a liter (about a quart) of air volume in a bicycle. I suspect that would be very high for a steel bike which has much smaller tubes. At 32°F, there is about 4 g (about a teaspoon) of water in a kilogram of air. The rub is that it takes 770 liters of air to equal on kg of air. In other words from about 700 times to 1400 times what you have in the tubes. In other words, you have to have a wind blowing through those tubes to get that much air through it.

Not that condensation would be much of an issue for the aluminum. It’s fairly inert to water corrosion.

Originally Posted by bikerbobbbb View Post
It's not a joke. The bike is outside so it's literally ice cold. You sit on a cold bike seat and then grip cold handlebars. There's definitely a difference riding a bike that's sitting outside vs. one that's kept inside -- Cold butt and fingers go numb faster gripping the cold handlebars. Add in having to squeeze the handlebars more if I wear thicker gloves when it's colder out or when it's icier out and I grip the handlebars more. So if I bring the bike inside before I ride it when I'm stuck having to leave it outside, that helps. I'm wondering if I can get it to room temperature faster though.

A fan blowing air over it. Maybe an electric blanket. Laying something on it that's warmed. Putting it by something like an old boiler or oven.
My bike is kept in my garage when I ride to work and is kept inside at work. I don’t really notice much difference when riding. It’s usually warmer in the evening, of course. That said, the type of handlebar tape or grips could make a difference. Thicker tape or foam rubber grips are warmer than thinner tape or plain rubber grips. They keep the heat from your hands being sucked into the metal of the bars quite so quickly. Carbon bars can also help. Carbon is an insulator and doesn’t transmit heat as much.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is online now  
Old 03-12-20, 05:12 AM
  #25  
nomadmax 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 1,296
Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 566 Post(s)
Liked 514 Times in 271 Posts
Just wear clothing appropriate for the weather conditions you're going to ride in. I used to ride in all weather conditions, including sub-zero ambient temps and my bike stayed outside in between calls. I can't say that I ever noticed a difference between stored inside and sitting out in the weather. Now a wet seat, that's a big difference but it's easily solved with a grocery bag or hotel shower cap.

Last edited by nomadmax; 03-12-20 at 09:15 AM.
nomadmax is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.