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custom build, or pre made?

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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

custom build, or pre made?

Old 12-14-14, 04:16 PM
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spinuchi
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custom build, or pre made?

I'm looking to buy a new single speed my last was a pure fix.. I know **** quality, but it was my first purchase and introduction to cycling. I rode it for over a year, and I'm looking to buy something of a way better quality. I have about 1000 to spend, my question is am I better off buying from a factory, or should I do a custom build. No preference on frame, steel is nice, but I'm open to aluminum frames as well. I want the best quality that I can get for that price. I know that opinions vary on best brands, etc.. but I'm open for any suggestions.
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Old 12-14-14, 04:22 PM
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define custom, do you mean getting it designed & built specifically for you, or just taking an of the shelf frame and putting a select groups of components on it?

If real custom, you probably need to triple your budget at least (regardless of currency) and research frame builders.
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Old 12-14-14, 04:30 PM
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Obviously I can't get custom built frame etc. For that price range, I meant custom off shelf parts. Factory frame, or even vintage frame bought from ebay.. honestly I'm more concerned about components opposed to frame. And I also should add that this will be my everyday commuter.
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Old 12-14-14, 04:34 PM
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Usually, you can get better deals on components buying a whole bike as a package than buying the pieces and putting (or having it put) together.
If you don't know what components you need, there's not a lot of motivation to piece a bike together.
I've got friends that build up their own bikes, but they scavenge Ebay for used parts continually to get the best deals there and know exactly what they want. Something I can't very well do.
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Old 12-14-14, 04:58 PM
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I have a general idea of what I would be looking at, I'm just curious if I could find a good quality facfactory made bike, or if im better off piecing together my own. The customization would be nice, but if I could save a little money and find a factory bike I would prefer that.
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Old 12-14-14, 05:02 PM
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if you want to learn more about bikes i'd buy a nice frame and move over whatever you can from the purefix. do some research to figure out what parts won't switch over, because you'll have to buy some stuff. But that way you can see the differences with the frames and learn a lot. Then down the road you can do the same with wheelset, crankset, pedals, etc. You'd learn a lot about bikes and get to pick exactly what you want. plus you could do it slowly, allowing you to spend more on a nice frame/fork/headset if they rest of you parts you can switch from the purefix.

If you couldn't give two ****s about learning anything about bikes or don't have the time and just want a better bike, then just go buy a better bike. You get more for your money if you go used off of ebay or cl usually, but if you want new there are a lot of options if you have $1000.

Wabi Cycles Special fixed gear bike specs
someone will probably tell you to get that.
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Old 12-14-14, 05:30 PM
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As long as there are no specific parts that you must have regardless of buying complete or building it up. I would buy complete. But if, for example, you must have a certain crank or wheelset, then i would just start from scratch.
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Old 12-14-14, 05:36 PM
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You will definitely do better on a custom build, price-wise. Shop around and find what you like. Many shops will allow you to swap out components, so like if you really wanted that Leader 725 but with Omnoms, the shop can price it out as a complete with an upgrade. You still come out much farther ahead than if you attempt to assemble a bike from retail parts you bought.
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Old 12-14-14, 05:53 PM
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Complete, and then the money you save can be spent on replacing something that you may want to change out, wheels, cranks, etc.
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Old 12-14-14, 08:35 PM
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I know a fair deal about bikes, and have swapped a few parts on the pure fix myself. Ie. The bottom bracket for a sealed bearing, a higher quality 48t crank, replaced the headset.. however my Fram and all the parts were stolen so I can't just swap into a new frame.
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Old 12-15-14, 10:38 PM
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I wouldn't worry about the components till you find the right frame. You want something comfortable and well built that is a material that is going to be comfortable for commuting. Aluminum gives a harsher ride, carbon is awesome for soaking up the road but I wouldn't want to commute in traffic with carbon, steel would be my favorite of them all but cheap steel is heavy and not as lively.

Once you figure out the frame you want to go with a reasonable parts build that isn't too flashy considering this is a commuter.

Next you want to spend a lot more money on locking your bike and watch some videos from people like Hal Ruzal so you don't get another bike stolen. This probably should have been at number 1

For a complete bike the Cinelli Gazzetta seems like a good bet. It is not fancy but it is a good starting point from which to improve. I would swap pedals for SPD compatible ones and switch the tires to Gatorskins but that would probably be it for a commuter/beater bike. However small things people wouldn't easily notice could be changed for something nicer.
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Old 12-15-14, 11:39 PM
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If you're going the custom built route, it never hurts to say money by buying used parts, even the frameset, from ebay or craigslist.
Or even prebuilts.
Nothing wrong with that. Just be sure to do your research ahead of time!
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Old 12-16-14, 03:32 AM
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Originally Posted by spinuchi View Post
honestly I'm more concerned about components opposed to frame.
Very poor thinking. The frame is far and away the most important component of the whole unit, if that's not right, the bike is crap. Put your money into the correct size and type of frame first, even if you find yourself using the bits off the purefix while you save.

I personally think you're better buying a complete bike - best value overall and your budget isn't big enough to really improve things with individual components. The one exception to that may be wheels and if buying from a shop or someone like Wabi, you should be able to swap the stock wheels for something better without having to pay full price for the wheels. You could also contact Scrod and ask him to quote you on a complete bike.
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Old 12-16-14, 04:04 AM
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If you're not going for a full track build, is the quality there in the "fixed" and "single speed" bikes? It seems like a lot I'm seeing appear to be pretty mediocre quality.

It is up to you, and what you're comfortable with. But, it shouldn't be too bad to build it from the ground up, getting your preferred handlebars, brakes, rims, spokes, hubs, etc.

And a good experience building it too... to make YOUR CUSTOM BIKE.
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Old 12-16-14, 04:47 AM
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spinuchi
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Sorry you misunderstood what I was trying to say by that. I know how important a good frame is I've spent a lot of time researching frames and I'm not worried about looking for a Fram in this post because when it comes down to it, I know what I am looking for.
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Old 12-16-14, 12:35 PM
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