Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Highest Price for a road bike for hilly races

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Highest Price for a road bike for hilly races

Old 02-17-20, 05:34 AM
  #76  
brianmatthew
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: united states
Posts: 2

Bikes: razor

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Highest Price for a road bike for hilly races

The highest price of a road bike for hilly races can be under 2000$.
But you can always consider various options for best road bikes under 500 as these bikes have great features and one can easily win hilly races with these bikes.
brianmatthew is offline  
Old 02-17-20, 12:38 PM
  #77  
KDR
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
Take the light bike and ride it. Next time strap 5 pounds to it and repeat. That way you have most factors the same. Weigh both bikes to see what the difference is.

Repeat multiple times to account for your own weight changes, fitness and wind difference.

Unless you weigh 90 pounds, I doubt 5 pounds will make much difference.
I am amazed that I don't remember ever hearing about the excellent idea of adding weight to a bike and comparing times that way with times by the same rider on the same course without any added weight on the bike. I was going to ask how similar your fit/position is between the two bikes in question because seemingly small differences there can make a surprising difference in efficiency.
KDR is offline  
Likes For KDR:
Old 02-17-20, 02:07 PM
  #78  
tpy2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Iowa
Posts: 108

Bikes: Trek 5500, 3 Catrike expeditions with various modifications, red line mountain bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Highest price

Sobre: I have read the above post and replies and of course, I have arrived at a slightly different answer. The amount you should spend is just under the limit it would take for your wife or significant other to re-read your life insurance policy to be sure that they would still eligible to collect after rendering their judgement on your spending $$$$$$ on your bike.

There is a relationship of diminished weight of the bike, the rider, ambient conditions, physical conditions and inherent athletic ability and your ability to climb. My advice, Spend what you can afford with a clear conscience, and ride to have fun. There are times when chasing extreme personal bests can leave you financially in the hole, Physically burnt out and possibly paying alimony! Have fun and it sounds like you made a heck of a deal on your last bike!
tpy2010 is offline  
Likes For tpy2010:
Old 02-17-20, 04:19 PM
  #79  
RiceAWay
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 124
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 89 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by KDR View Post
I am amazed that I don't remember ever hearing about the excellent idea of adding weight to a bike and comparing times that way with times by the same rider on the same course without any added weight on the bike. I was going to ask how similar your fit/position is between the two bikes in question because seemingly small differences there can make a surprising difference in efficiency.
I have bikes ranging from 18 lbs to 24 lbs. Of course the flat kit and water bottle adds 2 lbs so it is 20 and 26. There is a detectable difference from lightest to heaviest. But unless you're a pro racer it wouldn't make any difference. The only places weight makes a difference is acceleration and climbing. And in climbing it can be substantial but so what? It doesn't stop you from getting to the top, you're just slower.

On a century why is everyone racing each other when the object is to ride a certain distance. Do you get more points by getting there faster? When you're on he Saturday Ride does getting to the next red light faster give you a thrill? Does dropping your buddy who is having a bad day prove something? On a climb everyone has their own speed. If you weigh 15 lbs less than someone do you think that having a bike 3 lbs lighter is going to improve you?
RiceAWay is offline  
Old 02-18-20, 04:16 AM
  #80  
subgrade
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Rīga, Latvia
Posts: 492

Bikes: Focus Crater Lake

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 215 Post(s)
Liked 93 Times in 66 Posts
Originally Posted by KDR View Post
I am amazed that I don't remember ever hearing about the excellent idea of adding weight to a bike and comparing times that way with times by the same rider on the same course without any added weight on the bike. I was going to ask how similar your fit/position is between the two bikes in question because seemingly small differences there can make a surprising difference in efficiency.
subgrade is offline  
Old 02-18-20, 09:20 AM
  #81  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 5,406

Bikes: '71 Jeunet 640, '74 Fuji Special Road Racer, '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 744 Post(s)
Liked 271 Times in 156 Posts
Not really...

Originally Posted by sobre View Post
... I just checked it. My new bike is exactly 17,5 lbs.
If you used a luggage scale or a suspended scale, then your uncertainty is likely +/- 0.1 lbs.

If you measured using a bathroom scale (holding the bike, and then without the bike, subtracting), then your measurement uncertainty is +/- 0.5 lbs. That's for each measurement.

In this case (scale that uses internal rounding to the nearest half pound), each of your measurements can be anywhere between - .25 and + 0.24 pounds to register at the number shown on your scale. These two measurements are made independently of one another, so the combined uncertainty error (in subtraction or addition) grows as a root-sum-square.

Last edited by Phil_gretz; 02-19-20 at 06:34 AM. Reason: correcting terminology for measurement uncertainty
Phil_gretz is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.