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Bike Touring Food Survival

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Bike Touring Food Survival

Old 12-11-18, 06:57 PM
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BikeWonder
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Bike Touring Food Survival

Hi everyone,

For those who have toured extensively, have you ever lived off the land?
The curiosity got to me, so I have to ask. It would be interesting if you depended on your bike for your travels,but in between resting you head out to hunt and manage to find something.
if you have hunted while bike touring, what gear do you use?
Bow? Self made trap? Fishing supplies?
is it even possible to do this kind of thing? I believe in North America it would be more likely, so if you have any unique stories, please share them
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Old 12-11-18, 08:20 PM
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Not about bikes but I've read that early man followed the rivers and water due partly to the food they has running in them. I've not read anything I can remember about hunting on a bike tour. There have been those who have gathered plant foods though. I suspect mostly taking from farm fields. My late wife and I had a wonderful freshly caught fish dinner once. But the campground owner had caught it in his stocked ponds just before he released the stock for the season. Andy
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Old 12-11-18, 08:54 PM
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Fishing pole. Look at the back of my rear pannier. This actually became more of a prop than a food getting device. I mailed the tackle home after one month. When traveling alone in rural America I prefer the conversation go towards hunting and fishing than "Boy, you must not have a gahdam thing to do" (this was actually said to me in Chivington, Colorado). Hence, the pole remained with me in a prominent position for even passing cars to see me. 100% prop for 4 months.



This book is great although it is the world's heaviest book for it's size by far. The trouble with foraging is that roadside plants are contaminated with car fluids/rubber and state parks generally forbid the removal of plants. And after a long day on the bike, who feels like hunting for edible weeds anyway. I gave the book to a fellow camper after about two weeks carrying it. Never tried trapping anything. Grocery stores and restaurants are much more dependable food sources.

Good question though. Didn't work for me. And I am happy with a can of sardines as a pig in slop.

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Old 12-11-18, 09:01 PM
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I havenít done it personally, but I think you certainly could if you really wanted to. The main thing these days would probably be your routing. Youíd have to make sure to keep on top of hunting laws in each area/season. Things like squirel and fish are pretty readily available all over the U.S. Foraging for fruits and vegetables really isnít terribly difficult. Most of us these days just donít realize how much is out there simply because this knowledge has left our culture in favor of the grocery store. There are simple things like dandelion flowers and young leaves that are eatible and fairly common. Nuts, other flowers, berries, etc. Now that very few hunt and gather, there isnít a whole lot of competition for food if you want to go get it. Personally my choices of weapons would be a fishing pole and sling shot. Both can be very small and compact. No need to bother with a gun. More maintenance and legality issues to deal with if traveling. A semi-skilled hunter can take small game with a sling shot. You wonít be hunting anything larger than a rabit if youíre on the move and have no refrigeration. The biggest thing here I think is the amount of time youíd be dedicating to food. It wouldnít end up being the 50+mi a day and leisurely camping at night. Iíd think youíd have to spend a lot of time hunting and gathering food, maybe alternating days between riding and food gathering. Rough guess, as Iíve never tried this sort of thing, or even tried randomly driving to a new area and scouting for small game right away without knowing the area at all.

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Old 12-11-18, 09:14 PM
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Many states require licenses to hunt or fish. So you have to worry about is it legal season for what you're after, and do you have the proper license.
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Old 12-11-18, 09:59 PM
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I thought about bringing a rod with me through Central and South America, but I don't know much about fishing and in the end I couldn't really figure out what kind of rod and equipment I would need. I met some sport fisherman in Costa Rica who thought it would've been a great idea, but obviously they had more knowledge than I.
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Old 12-12-18, 01:26 AM
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I always take a telescopic rod with me when I tour with spinning reel and lures.

Less to do with "living off the land" as just another tool to offer some relaxing recreation in my off saddle time with the bonus of an occasional free meal.

I've had success from both beach fishing and river mouths on an incoming tide, to various degrees.

Due to these "various degrees" I always have a backup meal within the panniers.
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Old 12-12-18, 03:44 AM
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Interesting topic.
I live off the land when I tour.... that is I enjoy the local food!

I think it's more of a romantic notion than a realistic option, given the fact that time taken foraging is less time for travelling and the risk of going hungry, especially if there is no back-up option. There's also the consideration that a lack of proper nutrition does not support a successful tour.
Consideration should also be given to where the tour is taking place. Here in Holland, I'll regularly see people stopping by cornfields at harvest time and filling a plastic bag with ripe corn cobs. I'm sure local farmers aren't happy at that, but in other parts of the world a foraging cyclist could well be taking food from local's mouths.

There's a good read on a similar subject...including the exploits of optimistic fishermen!

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...api_tkin_p1_i0
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Old 12-12-18, 05:42 AM
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Originally Posted by steve0257 View Post
Many states require licenses to hunt or fish. So you have to worry about is it legal season for what you're after, and do you have the proper license.
+1. And you have to be on land where hunting/fishing is permitted. There is also method. (E.g., You can only fish some bodies of water with artificial lures.) Some are catch and release only. Sounds way to involved.
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Old 12-12-18, 07:23 AM
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Fruits and berries during season here in New England. I try to be resourceful. And only to top off my food supply.
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Old 12-12-18, 09:15 AM
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Fresh roadkill can be eaten, I’ve heard. If the vultures have arrived, you are probably too late.
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Old 12-12-18, 09:42 AM
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Originally Posted by alan s View Post
Fresh roadkill can be eaten, I’ve heard. If the vultures have arrived, you are probably too late.
in that case, you kill one of the birds, nothing like a bit of good carrion eater.

and I really liked Hobbes's comment on living off local food--pretty much sums up this topic, a topic I know all of us are responding to more out of fun, as living off foraging is not a realistic idea, and I imagine the person posting the question was bored and wanted to see the response from us non-hunterer-gatherers.
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Old 12-12-18, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
in that case, you kill one of the birds, nothing like a bit of good carrion eater.
Happy to say I have never been that hungry on any bike tour. And it won't kill you to go a day or two without food. And I know you were just kidding but that is pretty disgusting to think about even field dressing a vulture.
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Old 12-12-18, 12:21 PM
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This..

Originally Posted by steve0257 View Post
Many states require licenses to hunt or fish. So you have to worry about is it legal season for what you're after, and do you have the proper license.
And touring England, for example , I found land owners who would not even let you camp near a potentially fish bearing stream ,
because, Like King's realms of old, the fish in the stream were his property..
and not having any fishing gear nor intent to fish did not satisfy him, so I had to move. ...



Finland, Sweden and Norway I presume less so , but you have to check that for yourself.






...


....
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Old 12-12-18, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by steve0257 View Post
Many states require licenses to hunt or fish. So you have to worry about is it legal season for what you're after, and do you have the proper license.
Yeah, 1st thing that came to mind was having DNR officers tear me a new one for not having the appropriate licenses or accidentally fishing in a reserve or something. Another thing to keep in mind is that you might need permits for foraging in certain places too.
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Old 12-12-18, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by JoeyBike View Post
Happy to say I have never been that hungry on any bike tour. And it won't kill you to go a day or two without food. And I know you were just kidding but that is pretty disgusting to think about even field dressing a vulture.
tell me about it. I've travelled by bike in places where everyday I encountered dead dogs and whatnot, being eaten by vultures or soon to be, and knowing what those guys eat wouldnt endear me to eating one of them....
The smell of decaying roadkill is one of those sights and sounds and smells of my last few bike trips, comes with the territory.
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Old 12-12-18, 02:28 PM
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Confronted with the Deli cases in Germany, and the Patisserie cases in France, I did a lot of pointing at food and discovering what it tasted like when I got it..

in Scotland I let the local mycologist folks determine which mushrooms are edible , there..
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Old 12-12-18, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Leebo View Post
Fruits and berries during season here in New England. I try to be resourceful. And only to top off my food supply.
Agreed. Foraging is fun and rewarding, but takes time. I love huckleberries and blueberries, wild raspberries, and blackberries. Trouble is, you eat too many and you get to participate in THIS thread.
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Old 12-12-18, 03:30 PM
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Best ever. Pedaling through S New Hampshire I stopped on the edge of hot August peach orchard, the most beautiful smell. I see this older farmer carry some heavy crates. I pitched in and helped him bring 20 or so out to the fruit stand. Just ripe goodness. He offered me 6, I didn't refuse. Made them last 3 days, perfect on morning oatmeal.
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Old 12-12-18, 03:49 PM
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Back when I could still ride up ahead on many group rides I used to fill up on wild blackberries, blueberries, and plums while waiting for the ride to regroup. Good for a little snacking, but really hard to get enough calories to sustain oneself. On tours I've gotten a few complementary fish meals when staying in campgrounds along lakes and rivers. Successful fishermen are frequently generous with their bounty.
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Old 12-13-18, 07:45 AM
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Dumpster diving might be easier.
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Old 12-13-18, 10:18 AM
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On two different occasions, I've taken breaks next to picnic shelters where a large group was having a feeding frenzy. (family reunions, etc..)

Looking as tired and pathetic as possible, people would start walking over and bringing me food and beverage.

This seemed to be a good strategy back when a bicycle tourist was more of a curiosity than it is today.
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Old 12-13-18, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by boomhauer View Post
On two different occasions, I've taken breaks next to picnic shelters where a large group was having a feeding frenzy. (family reunions, etc..)

Looking as tired and pathetic as possible, people would start walking over and bringing me food and beverage.

This seemed to be a good strategy back when a bicycle tourist was more of a curiosity than it is today.
It can still work. A few years ago I was staying at the Bike Camp in Twin Bridges, MT, which is part of the city park. There was a family there having a big picnic lunch. More food than they could eat. They offered me some. Last year, the wife of the host at Sprague Creek Campground in Glacier National Park gave me some fresh-out-of-the-oven oatmeal raisin cookies. In 2015, in Edgemont, SD (where I think you have been), it was hot dogs from the grill. Unfortunately, I had just woofed down a large steak, etc., and couldn't eat another thing.
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Old 12-13-18, 01:11 PM
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Hunter/gathering is a time consuming way of life, and hunter/gathering while travelling seems especially difficult. I think it would take a high level of skill and experience to do it.

If there was a route along a fishable river, that would feasible, I think.

(I'm not much of an outdoorsman, but I have watched a lot of Les Stroud.)
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Old 12-13-18, 02:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Leebo View Post
Best ever. Pedaling through S New Hampshire I stopped on the edge of hot August peach orchard, the most beautiful smell. I see this older farmer carry some heavy crates. I pitched in and helped him bring 20 or so out to the fruit stand. Just ripe goodness. He offered me 6, I didn't refuse. Made them last 3 days, perfect on morning oatmeal.
You ate 6 crates of peaches in three days?

In all seriousness...We stopped to pick blueberries in ME on the last day of a X-country tour.
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