Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Peugeot UO8

Old 12-08-17, 07:40 PM
  #26  
Bill in VA
Senior Member
 
Bill in VA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 240

Bikes: Current: 2016 Bianchi Volpe; 1973 Peugeot UO-8. Past: 1974 Fuji with custom black Imron paint by Stinsman Racing of PA.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 59 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
As a UO-8 owner (mine is a near twin to post #16 except white cable housing) since 1973, I say fix it up. Mine has been dead reliable. It has only been changed on the rear derailleur, the rims, and the seatpost. Bought new with a bike shop fitted Suntour V-GT for the mountains of central PA, it was refitted with a French Simplex Criterium (looks like a Prestige with a silver name plate and steel reinforcements on the body for crisper shifts). It also has a cotterless crank fitted and alloy rims.

If removing cottered French cranks, keep the cotters and label which side they come off of. French cotters are hard to find, as are bottom bracket parts. I went to alloy rims after a steep long descent with the steel Rigida rims ended with melted Mafac Racer pad material filling the brake surface serrations. The cotterless crank was added because I did NOT label what side the cotters came from and they never fit securely afterwards. One benefit was the new crank took English pedals. The alloy seatpost in French size was added when the Ideale 39 saddle was swapped out after a soaking (it has since been restored and sits on the original chrome steel seatpost).

I moved on to a different bike after about 3 years, but could not part with the Peugeot. After I got married, my wife was introduced to cycling on the UO-8 which she rode for 2 years before she went to a Bianchi mainly due to the difficulty of getting French parts when Mel Pinto closed. I still take it for a spin occasionally, and it gets a lot of looks. When I no longer ride it it will became a wall display of a classic 1970s bike boom French bike. I just cannot sell it. I would have been the same with my first car, a 1965 VW Beetle, but PA road salt and wet had a hand there.

You will like that bike.
Bill in VA is offline  
Old 12-30-17, 02:23 PM
  #27  
Panurgist
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Richmond, Va
Posts: 5

Bikes: Rivendell Sam Hillborne, Peugeot UO8, Trek 820, Motobecane Grand Record + projects

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The UO8 was a cheap bike, mass produced, spec'ed to a budget, that accidentally (?) has a really sweet geometry and an amazingly durable construction. It rides intuitively and comfortably way above it's pedigree. Yes, it's tubing is low grade, it's lugs are classless, it's manufacture haphazard...but the the design is beautiful, as is the ride. Viva la France!
Panurgist is offline  
Old 12-30-17, 03:27 PM
  #28  
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Posts: 13,062

Bikes: 73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, 72 Peugeot UO-8, 82 Peugeot TH8, 87 Bianchi Brava, 76? Masi Grand Criterium, 87 Centurion Ironman Expert, 74 Motobecane Champion Team, 86 & 77 Gazelle champion mondial, 81? Grandis, 82? Tommasini, 83 Peugeot PFN10

Mentioned: 169 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1046 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by Panurgist View Post
The UO8 was a cheap bike, mass produced,... it's lugs are classless, ...but the design is beautiful, as is the ride. Viva la France!
I'd describe the lugs as in a class by themselves rather than classless. The Aztek design must have worked well for brazing and was certainly distinctive.

As for the ride and performance, I upgraded most of the components on mine and still ride it. I've ridden eight or nine different C&V bikes up Cadillac Mt. in Acadia National Park and the most recent, September 2016, was the UO-8. (IIRC they used the hyphen in the name back then.) It holds its own quite nicely.

__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline  
Old 02-17-19, 01:06 PM
  #29  
SteelyMan
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: HI
Posts: 18

Bikes: Steel is for real!

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jimmuller View Post
Wow, a 2004 thread revived in 2011 and revived again in 2017! I'll chime in because I've been riding my UO-8 since about 1972. Put decent alloy wheels on it with good tires, install Suntour Vx or VGT Luxe derailleurs, replace all the steel bits with alloy as you can afford it, and you'll have a nice road bike.
Just stumbled upon this and had to keep it going like a chain letter... I just bought one on evilbay and am awaiting its arrival. Needs a lot of putting back together and I plan on some updates hopefully if I can figure out the compatability. I rode my dads, I think UO8, around a bit as a teenager back in 90í-92í. I loved the ride and miss it, so I hunted one down. I dig all types of cycling, fixed, road, mountain its all fun and games. Cant beat a steel frame. I have a modern aluminum road and mtb and I prefer my older steel frame counterparts.

Keep it going
SteelyMan is offline  
Old 02-17-19, 01:08 PM
  #30  
SteelyMan
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: HI
Posts: 18

Bikes: Steel is for real!

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jimmuller View Post
I'd describe the lugs as in a class by themselves rather than classless. The Aztek design must have worked well for brazing and was certainly distinctive.

As for the ride and performance, I upgraded most of the components on mine and still ride it. I've ridden eight or nine different C&V bikes up Cadillac Mt. in Acadia National Park and the most recent, September 2016, was the UO-8. (IIRC they used the hyphen in the name back then.) It holds its own quite nicely.

btw, where is this pic taken? Beautiful place. Never been tthere but Iím guessing Nova Scotia.
SteelyMan is offline  
Old 02-17-19, 01:23 PM
  #31  
Aubergine 
Bad example
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Seattle and Reims
Posts: 2,947
Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 771 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by SteelyMan View Post

Just stumbled upon this and had to keep it going like a chain letter... I just bought one on evilbay and am awaiting its arrival. Needs a lot of putting back together and I plan on some updates hopefully if I can figure out the compatability. I rode my dads, I think UO8, around a bit as a teenager back in 90í-92í. I loved the ride and miss it, so I hunted one down. I dig all types of cycling, fixed, road, mountain its all fun and games. Cant beat a steel frame. I have a modern aluminum road and mtb and I prefer my older steel frame counterparts.
So you found one! Is it green? I am definitely looking forward to a new thread about it. I sure love my AO-8.
__________________
Keeping Seattleís bike shops in business since 1978
Aubergine is offline  
Old 02-17-19, 01:30 PM
  #32  
76SLT 
Senior Member
 
76SLT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Earlville, IL
Posts: 340

Bikes: 72 Crescent 318, 72 Peugeot UO-8, 73 Raleigh Grand Sports, 76 Super Le Tour 12.2, 78 Superior, 80 Super Le Tour, 84 Bianchi Nuovo Racing, 87 Centurion Ironman, 1950s Unknown English Bike

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 117 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 10 Posts
I posted a pic of my green one on the other thread a few days ago. I'm glad you found one.
76SLT is offline  
Old 02-17-19, 07:09 PM
  #33  
SteelyMan
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: HI
Posts: 18

Bikes: Steel is for real!

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Aubergine View Post

So you found one! Is it green? I am definitely looking forward to a new thread about it. I sure love my AO-8.
I did. A lot of very helpful folks on here. Iím new and half the time I try and respond it tells me I canít post URLís even though I havent put any web addresses nor uploaded any pics. Actually Iíve tried tonpost a reply to every single response I have received as everybody has been super cool and helpful. Just get shut down more than half the time. Maybe cause Iím not tech savvy.

Anywaysssss its red. I still want a green one and this red one sort of caught my eye and probably wonít have the heart to change the color on it as that just doesnít seem right. In fact I jumped the gun on calling it a UO8. I responded to a few and got them confused. Nearly all I responded to were UO8. I think it is also but not certain...it has the chrome tipped fork but I suppose other models may have as well. Gonna need derailleurs and Iíll be finding out soon if this will be difficult or easy. Probably will need upgrading at wheels as well. I wonder how many people are familiar with switching to 700c and if that is even a good idea. I know about brake reach but Iím curious about being slightly closer to the ground if that will cause issue with pedal strike. Im wondering about the bb height? 10-5/8"?? Having one a little upgraded but relatively true to its origins seems cool. If the bb height is 10-5/8" having one ss or fixed seems like a fun bike as well. I started thinking that way cause a few that I stumbled across were missing quite a few components or obviously broken parts like the downtube shifters for instance. I saw somebody just posted a pic of a nice green one that they were going to install brakes and potentially sell.
SteelyMan is offline  
Old 02-17-19, 07:12 PM
  #34  
SteelyMan
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: HI
Posts: 18

Bikes: Steel is for real!

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by 76SLT View Post
I posted a pic of my green one on the other thread a few days ago. I'm glad you found one.
Hello, was that your bike that was gonna be available after you install brakes? If so it was nice. Green still is my favorite on the Peugeot. Super classy. The checkered decals look so nice against the green imo.
SteelyMan is offline  
Old 02-17-19, 07:13 PM
  #35  
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Posts: 13,062

Bikes: 73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, 72 Peugeot UO-8, 82 Peugeot TH8, 87 Bianchi Brava, 76? Masi Grand Criterium, 87 Centurion Ironman Expert, 74 Motobecane Champion Team, 86 & 77 Gazelle champion mondial, 81? Grandis, 82? Tommasini, 83 Peugeot PFN10

Mentioned: 169 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1046 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by SteelyMan View Post

btw, where is this pic taken? Beautiful place. Never been tthere but Iím guessing Nova Scotia.
Welcome to C&V! That pic could have been Nova Scotia as the coastline would be similar. However this was at the top of Cadillac Mountain, Acadia National Park, on Mt. Desert Island, Maine. That view is looking north. Turn around 180 degrees and you see the Atlantic.
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline  
Old 06-05-19, 08:49 AM
  #36  
lindseyh
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Peugeot UO8 re-bending spread rear dropout

I bought my U08 brand new in 1973. The guys that I rode with told me that the Delrin plastic derailleurs were junk and would break. The guys were right. The rear derailleur broke - in 2018! The derailleur failed during a ride, locking the rear wheel. The rear axle broke into two pieces. The dropout on the derailleur side spread into a 'V" shape.
My question is about bending the dropout back into the original shape to form the axle slot. Should I heat the dropout to soften the steel before bending or bend it cold and possibly risk hardening or embrittling the steel dropout? If I heat the dropout with a propane torch, do I need to be concerned with affecting the brazed joints at the tube frames?
Also, I'm considering a used Suntour V-GT rear derailleur to replace the broken Simplex. It's not OEM but it is the roughly the correct vintage, has a good reputation from what I've read, and affordable. Any thoughts about a replacement rear derailleur?
Thanks
lindseyh is offline  
Old 06-05-19, 11:35 AM
  #37  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 19,404

Bikes: 1959 & 1960 Capo; 1982 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 697 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 20 Posts

Yes, absolutely replace the Simplex with SunTour. This one started out as a bare frame and has always had aluminum cranks, Shimano Titlist front derailleur, and a SunTour rear derailleur. It is by far the lowliest steed in my stable (see signature), but probably gets the most use just because it is so versatile and "scratchable."

I would slowly and gently bend the dropout back into shape and then check for cracks.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324
Capo: 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 06-05-19, 01:37 PM
  #38  
bikingshearer 
Crawlin' up, flyin' down
 
bikingshearer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Democratic Peoples' Republic of Berkeley
Posts: 3,779

Bikes: 1967 Paramount, 1982-ish Ron Cooper,1978 Eisentraut "A," mid-1960s Cinelli Speciale Corsa, 1961 Bianchi Competizione (an Eroica bike), 1994 Trek 520, 199? Burley Bossa Nova, early-1970s Cinelli Speciale Corsa (also an Eroica bike)

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 172 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by lindseyh View Post
. . . . My question is about bending the dropout back into the original shape to form the axle slot. Should I heat the dropout to soften the steel before bending or bend it cold and possibly risk hardening or embrittling the steel dropout? If I heat the dropout with a propane torch, do I need to be concerned with affecting the brazed joints at the tube frames? . . . .
I wouldn't heat the dropout. Cold-setting (bike-speak for "bending") is sufficient. I don't know if a propane torch would generate enough heat to affect the brazing, by why risk it?

Campagnolo and Park both made/make tools to do exactly what you want. I'm sure others have made them as well - VAR, for instance. If you have a local shop that understands vintage (bike-speak for "old") steel frames and has the tools to do this job, find out what they will charge to realign the dropout. If it is within your budget, let a pro do it (and by "pro", I do not mean the 17 year old kid who probably doesn't know that bike frames can be made of steel).

You can do it yourself with a couple pairs of vise grips or channel locks pliers (one to bend the part that is out of alignment, the other to keep you from bending that part that is still in alignment. The trick isn't bending it back so it is close; the trick is fine tuning the dropout back into proper position so that derailleurs and wheels are in proper alignment. Having the right tool(s) for the job make that much easier.

Welcome to C&V. It's a pretty gentle crowd, most of the time. Just don't get people started on Campagnolo vs. Shimano.
__________________
"I'm in shape -- round is a shape." Andy Rooney
bikingshearer is offline  
Old 06-05-19, 02:13 PM
  #39  
sykerocker 
Senior Member
 
sykerocker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Ashland, VA
Posts: 4,088

Bikes: The keepers: 1958 Raleigh Lenton Grand Prix, 1968 Ranger, 1969 Magneet Sprint, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1973 Raleigh Tourist, 1973 Lambert, 1973 Schwinn Super Sport, 3 - 1986 Rossins, and a '77 PX-10 frame to be built.

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 87 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 10 Posts
One of my bikes that I shouldn't have sold, and still regret selling. The picture is as it was originally restored, and later sold. In between, the majority of it's life was spent sporting Normandy hubs and French tubular rims (forget the brand) and tires. The difference in performance was, as would be expected, incredible. I've always loved a late 60's/early 70's low end amateur racing bike, and really enjoyed riding this bike.

Another moment of "one too many bikes and I'm moving". So the UO-8 went so the Tour de France could stay.

__________________
Syke

"No wonder we keep testing positive in their bicycle races. Everyone looks like they're full of testosterone when they're surrounded by Frenchmen." ---Argus Hamilton
sykerocker is offline  
Old 06-07-19, 07:07 AM
  #40  
markk900
Senior Member
 
markk900's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Ontario
Posts: 1,804
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I had a similar dropout issue with my AO-8; I was able to carefully bend it back into shape as suggested (no heat needed) then realigned the dropouts. Just take your time and donít bend too much/rapidly, avoid flexing back and forth.
markk900 is offline  
Old 06-09-19, 07:24 AM
  #41  
Road Fan
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 14,202

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 801 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Poguemahone View Post
UO8s make nice beater bikes and excellent urban fixies. Keep the headset and bottom bracket maintained, as they can be difficult to replace.

Check your rims; if they are steel, consider replacing them for daily riding (alloy rims brake better than steel). It likely has a cottered crank, and I recommend trying to replace these with cotterless eventually. Take your time; replacement parts can be found cheaply in thrifts and the like if you're patient.

Pricing seems to vary. I bought mine for five dollars and fixed it up as a fixed gear with old parts from my basement; the total investment was just under 40$. I personally wouldn't pay more than 25$ for one, but I've seen them go for more on ebay and one poster here swears 125-250$ is fair for one modernized and in good condition.

The bikes do have some odd issues-- weird seatpost sizing, 96mm front dropout width, but all this can be overcome with a tad of ingenuity. There's a reason why people still like riding them.
One of the best ways to avoid problems with weird parts like the seatpost, BB and headset (and others) is, don't lose the originals or their bolts/nuts! Also buy a cheap (Harbor Freight) digital caliper and measure the key dimensions of parts as you remove them (such as the seat post).
Road Fan is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
j-law
Pacific Northwest
23
03-07-10 09:31 PM
Daspydyr
Foo
23
11-25-09 12:20 PM
Starpath
Introductions
2
11-30-08 05:55 PM
cs1
Bicycle Mechanics
4
04-23-06 07:17 PM
Patriot
Road Cycling
23
02-27-06 11:14 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.