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Pedals for commuting

Old 06-13-11, 01:07 PM
  #26  
squirtdad
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Originally Posted by AdamDZ View Post
Either use clipless pedals or just flat pedals without any straps. All those kinds of straps take longer to get you foot out than unclipping from a good clipless pedal. There is also higher chance of your shoes getting caught up in those.

Really, majority of cyclists in the world use plain, flat pedals. The whole hoopla about "power when pulling" etc., is just that: "hoopla". Pedal retention may make sense for racers where every second counts, for track/fixed riders or MTB'ers who need to be able to bunny hop, but for riding a bike to work, running errands you really don't need any of that, it's just an unnecessary complication with no tangible benefits. Just stick to grippy flat pedals and you will be fine.
At risk of this digressing into a clipless/vs no clip thread, I have to disagree with Mr. DZ.
I find a tangible difference between using platforms, using toe clips and clipless. My personal experience is that even for short commutes (i.e 5 miles one way) using clipless is more efficient and more comfortable. Part of this is becaues using clipless, you are using a stiffer shoe, but beyond that I find having my foot is position, not having to put any energy or attention to keep it in position is more relaxing. And for longer rides on my road bike the difference is huge.

That said, I by no means just go clipless. I use the two sided platform/spd on my utitliyt commuter and if i am just runing some errands.... I hop on the bike and go. for commuting I put on the clipless shoes (and throw on shorts and a t shirt and then change at work).

so to the OP my recommendation is to get the two side pedals, so that at some point your choose to go for clips, you have the option. The platform side of the pedal is just fine.
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Old 06-13-11, 01:31 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by enigmaT120 View Post
Do they have good bearings, so that they spin easily? Some platform pedals are junk: you can spin them with your hand and they stop spinning after a couple of turns. I have a pair of BMX pedals (Wellgo? I can't remember the brand!) that will spin for a long time. But they cost in the 30 dollar range, whereas Nashbars are more like 15.
No, the Nashbar pedals are not that "cheap", they're $25. Yeah, they spin freely, even after several years if all-weather use. Nashbar really makes good stuff. They're heavier and non-flashy but they really work well.
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Old 06-13-11, 01:59 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
At risk of this digressing into a clipless/vs no clip thread, I have to disagree with Mr. DZ.
I find a tangible difference between using platforms, using toe clips and clipless. My personal experience is that even for short commutes (i.e 5 miles one way) using clipless is more efficient and more comfortable. Part of this is becaues using clipless, you are using a stiffer shoe, but beyond that I find having my foot is position, not having to put any energy or attention to keep it in position is more relaxing. And for longer rides on my road bike the difference is huge.

That said, I by no means just go clipless. I use the two sided platform/spd on my utitliyt commuter and if i am just runing some errands.... I hop on the bike and go. for commuting I put on the clipless shoes (and throw on shorts and a t shirt and then change at work).

so to the OP my recommendation is to get the two side pedals, so that at some point your choose to go for clips, you have the option. The platform side of the pedal is just fine.
Like many other things, this is a subjective matter too. For me the "efficiency" factor is totally negligible (I carry enough weight to make any "efficiency" improvement a moot point) and is far outweighed by the necessity to use special shoes to ride. I like to hop on my bike(s) without having to worry about what shoes I'm wearing. I rode with clipless and I saw no improvement in my commute comfort or time and the constant unclipping and clipping in traffic drove me bonkers. And walking in shoes with cleats on is too annoying as well under normal, everyday use. And I'm talking about SPD type pedals, not typical road pedals/shoes, those are suicidal to walk in I tried LOOK pedals once and I literally removed them and threw into a trash can, laughing, after less than 30 minutes of riding. Well, I came back later and retrieved them, and sold on Craigslist along with the shoes...

I have no problem keeping my feet on the pedals, it requires no attention from me at all. I really can't see how that requires energy or attention? I spent my entire childhood riding with cheap, flat pedals, I had no idea and I was happy. I can hardly see that as a benefit I can't imagine being "relaxed" riding in traffic while my feet are attached to the pedals So yeah, this is a VERY subjective and personal choice.

Cages and straps are plain unsafe, I'd rather use clipless pedals.

I agree about longer rides, well partially. If I was doing a century out in the country, I would be inclined to go clipless. Although, I rode centuries with platforms too, but I did wear MTB shoes with stiffer soles. But for commuting and utility cycling clipless pedals are not worth the trouble.

My bottom line is that clipless pedals are not REQUIRED, as many people like to think, to properly ride a bicycle. You will not become a better rider just by swapping your pedals and it will not make a day-and-night difference. Again, people rode around the planet on bikes with flat pedals. Clipless pedals are an optional accessory and, depending on the particular person, they may or may not provide any benefit. And I honestly can't see any benefit for short commute rides and errands.

With regular pedals I just hope on and ride a bike. With clipless pedals it becomes "cycling", a sport, a process, it's distracting, it takes away from me the pure, simple joy of riding a bike.
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Old 06-13-11, 02:21 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
Maybe its just me but without some kind of foot location device my left foot in particular wanders away from properly centered on the pedal and slides outward. In rain its just about impossible to keep my feet on the pedals except with sneakers. For efficiencies sake if nothing else, it is hard to deny the utility of a pair of toe-clips and straps as an aid to foot placement.
I really, honestly, cross-my-heart, don't understand this. Not for the sake of arguing, not to be smartass or anything but I really don't understand this argument. I heard it before and I'm always dumbfounded. I rode in mud, sand, snow, freezing ice and I never had any problems with my feet placement. You probably never used proper grippy pedals with studs for traction. It's nearly impossible to move your foot on that kind of pedal without lifting it first. It requires a conscious movement to move your foot like that. How kids on BMX bikes manage to do their crazy jumps and land their feet on the pedals?

Those plastic or rubber pedals that come stock with many bikes are a recipe for accident, yeah. But proper BMX or MTB flat pedals will hold your foot in place.

Anyone claiming they can't ride a bike without some kind of foot retention mechanism are really missing something. It's just not true!
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Old 06-13-11, 02:47 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by AdamDZ View Post
Anyone claiming they can't ride a bike without some kind of foot retention mechanism are really missing something. It's just not true!
i would never claim that i can't ride a bike without clipless pedals, i just really hate the sensation of not having my feet attached to the bike. i rode bikes for decades just fine on regular old platforms without foot retention. i tried clips and straps and didn't like that arrangement, so i went back to platforms, and then about 3 years ago i gave clipless pedals a try and, once i became used to them, i fell in love. it felt like i became one with the bike, like i had more control over the bike, a man-machine synthesis. riding locked into the pedals just feels "right" for me.

i can still ride a bike with regular old platforms, but i would never want to because it's so much less fun for me.
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Old 06-13-11, 02:57 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by AdamDZ View Post
Really, majority of cyclists in the world use plain, flat pedals. The whole hoopla about "power when pulling" etc., is just that: "hoopla". Pedal retention may make sense for racers where every second counts, for track/fixed riders or MTB'ers who need to be able to bunny hop, but for riding a bike to work, running errands you really don't need any of that, it's just an unnecessary complication with no tangible benefits. Just stick to grippy flat pedals and you will be fine.
I get far and away more tangible benefit out of my clipless pedals and shoes than from my fenders, which were the single most disappointing piece of hoopla I've ever made the mistake of attaching to my bike.

Also, let it be known that the majority of cyclists in the world do not use panniers or lights. I don't think that means lights are so much hoopla.
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Old 06-13-11, 05:51 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
I get far and away more tangible benefit out of my clipless pedals and shoes than from my fenders, which were the single most disappointing piece of hoopla I've ever made the mistake of attaching to my bike.

Also, let it be known that the majority of cyclists in the world do not use panniers or lights. I don't think that means lights are so much hoopla.
Lights, panniers and fenders provide a lot more tangible benefits than clipless pedals
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Old 06-13-11, 06:11 PM
  #33  
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Panniers and fenders provide the tangible benefit of making cycling more enjoyable when riding with a load or in the wet, respectively, yes? At least for some people, anyway. Similarly, clipless pedals provide the tangible benefit of make cycling more fun when sprinting, hammering, climbing; basically going all out and getting your aggro on. At least for some people, I think.

I'm with you on the platforms, Adam. I find the added power during hard riding that is provided by clipless is less of a benefit to my personal cycling experience than being able to wear whatever shoes I want, the ability to move my feet around if I want to, and not think at all about getting on or off of the pedals. But that's just me, and I almost never hammer anymore; I like to relax and cruise. People's preferences about how and what their cycling experience should be is so varied that for a lot of bike issues, the only to know for sure what they want or what they'd like is to just try it for themselves.
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Old 06-13-11, 07:06 PM
  #34  
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I've been eyeing these from Rivbike, https://www.rivbike.com/products/show...g-pedal/14-053, though purchasing them from someone else like Amazon where they are cheaper.
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Old 06-13-11, 08:23 PM
  #35  
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My main commuter came equipped with pedals similar to these:
https://www.wellgo.com.tw/product.asp...cnc%20platform
They work well with a variety of shoes, from hiking boots in winter to Keen sandals in summer, even some dressy shoes. As long as there's a bit of a soft sole for the little threaded pins to dig into, they're almost as grippy as SPDs.
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Old 06-13-11, 09:15 PM
  #36  
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I used Power Grips on my last three bikes. I liked the feel and could ride with just about any shoe I was wearing. My most recent bike came with Well-Go City Pedals https://https://www.rei.com/product/75...214-city-pedal. I was surprised how much I liked them. They are very comfortable and secure under any shoe. I rode them for 65 miles this weekend with no problems.
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Old 06-13-11, 09:52 PM
  #37  
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I use basic BMX/MTB pedals with pins in them. Examples are the Nashbar MTBs are already mentioned, I have a pair of Crank Bros 5050s, and my daily commuter came with a pair of old Mongoose pinned MTB pedals (bought the bike on CL). I use some soft-soled shoes for riding to work, then changed into my workshoes when I arrive. Never tried clipless myself, since I could never find a pair of clipless shoes that fit; no matter what the size on the shoebox, or what the conversion chart says, I've never found a clipless shoe that will comfortably fit my size 13-14 USA feet (13 for casual shoes, 14 for boots).
 
Old 06-13-11, 10:23 PM
  #38  
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I use these on my Surly Big Dummy. I like the adjustable pins and the large platform. They are a bit pricey with an MSRP of $109 but you can find them for less. You can even use them without shoes if you remove the pins.
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Old 06-14-11, 12:17 AM
  #39  
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I'm a firm believer in mtb pedals. Big surface, lots of grip, can get banged about a bit, comfortable. I'm known to spend handsomely for the right kit and have these on a bad-boy at present: Xpedo Curves https://www.amazon.com/Xpedo-Curve-pl...8031603&sr=8-5 (my other mtb pedals are on mtb's and have pins that could tear up the soles of work/dress shoes. These pedals have been great with every shoe I've tried, running sneaks, skate shoes, crocks..yea I know.., even great with my birkenstocks, admittedly havent rocked them with high stylin church/funeral/wedding type shoes)
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Old 06-14-11, 12:57 AM
  #40  
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For urban riding, I find that regular platform pedals are more beneficial as I have to stop all the time.

I guess if I was in some sort of competition, I'd want maximum connection to the pedal, but I don't race--at all. Especially for commuting.

I've ridden on-road, off-road, uphill, downhill, wet, dry, shoes, no-shoes, barefoot in regular BMX style pedals for hours, and could really care less about needing clip-in footwear. I can wear whatever shoes I want, just jump on the bike, and go. I get to move my feet around so they don't get sore.
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Old 06-14-11, 01:05 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by GojiSube View Post
I've been eyeing these from Rivbike, https://www.rivbike.com/products/show...g-pedal/14-053, though purchasing them from someone else like Amazon where they are cheaper.
These are what I ride, and they're awesome. You can find them for about 2/3rds the price of what Rivendell sells them for if you search for "MKS Lambda" instead of "Grip King". They are a little slippery when wet, so I drilled them for pedal spikes like Rivendell suggests. The reflectors don't break off like on every other platform pedal I've had, they spin like crazy, and with the pedal spikes my feet never slip.
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Old 06-14-11, 03:37 AM
  #42  
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I have those MKS Lambda's on a cruiser/hybrid I dont tend to ride much, I first had them on a city bike but found they were not the best for getting the foot oriented for powerful spirited pedaling, the shape encourages the placement of your mid to fore-foot across the ample surface and I found it made for a decent enough casual/lazy cadence but didnt naturally foster the placement of the ball of foot, or that lateral region generally across the ball of the big toe in line about the the pedal spindle. I find that a smaller pedal surface facilitates that better, for me I have found the Lambda's to more complement a bike with an easier more casual mission. No doubt they are comfortable and have the surface area for sure footing (unless it's wet) but in my quiver of pedals I have others that I think "work" better for the nitty gritty city.

Frankly the MKS sylvan pedals work a treat if the OP is looking for something traditional and easy. They are decent on the city streets and under foot and wont tear the soles of your shoes up.

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Old 06-14-11, 04:00 AM
  #43  
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I've used MKS Sylvian Touring for years, as an everyday commuter pedal with and without toe clips, in all weather. They are smoothe, reliable, easy to service and sufficiently grippy. I also use them for long distance bike tours.
BMX style pedals with pins will wreck dress shoes very rapidly.
I understand the issue with modern styled office shoes having pointy toes. Its a stupid fashion and I am looking high and low for some foot-shaped office shoes.

I usually use metal toe clips but they can scuff nice shoes so plastic may be more suitable.
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Old 06-14-11, 06:29 AM
  #44  
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https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/phot...eat=directlink
I really like these Shimano MX30 pedals. For about a year & half I used mtb clipless pedals and Shimano sandals but didn't notice much of an efficiency increase!

Last edited by reueladhikari; 06-14-11 at 06:35 AM. Reason: add pic
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Old 06-14-11, 01:42 PM
  #45  
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I use DMR v8 flat pedals. They are fairly cheap and very grippy.
I have found them to be much better than the bear trap pedals I had before.
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Old 06-14-11, 02:23 PM
  #46  
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Just go old school and be done with it.

https://store.velo-orange.com/index.p...ck-pedals.html
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Old 06-14-11, 03:41 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by AdamDZ View Post
Lights, panniers and fenders provide a lot more tangible benefits than clipless pedals
+100
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Old 06-14-11, 04:19 PM
  #48  
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I ride Shimano A530's. SPD on one side, platform on the other. I find that I almost never ride them as platform pedals. I dislike the sensation of my feet loose on the pedals far too much. But, occasionally I do and they are useful for a quick trip of a few blocks in my normal shoes.
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Old 06-14-11, 04:34 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by DirtRoadRunner View Post
I ride Shimano A530's. SPD on one side, platform on the other. I find that I almost never ride them as platform pedals. I dislike the sensation of my feet loose on the pedals far too much. But, occasionally I do and they are useful for a quick trip of a few blocks in my normal shoes.
i'm the exact same way, all of my bikes are equipped with dual-sided SPD/platform pedals. like you, i'm almost always locked into the SPD side, but should the need ever arise to quickly hop on one of my bikes and i'm not wearing my SPD shoes, i can always just ride on the platform side. it's the best of both worlds.
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Old 06-14-11, 04:46 PM
  #50  
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I use platform ( forte ) pedals with out clips, they work very well for me.
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