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Is MPL brand mineral turpentine good to burn?

Old 01-12-20, 07:28 AM
  #1  
Masjaf
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Is MPL brand mineral turpentine good to burn?

Hello,

I am looking for some advice regarding the burning of MPL brand mineral turpentine here in Spain. The label says white spirit although it seems to contain smaller chain alkanes.

I am using the Primus Omnifuel II. I have already been burning the fuel without too much soot for some time, but I had to use the warranty service to replace some parts after the stove started malfunctioning even with regular maintenance. I am concerned about health effects and if it perhaps damages the stove parts.

I have attached the data sheet of the product (unfortunately it is in Spanish). It doesn't seem to contain any additives but I am unsure about the small part of aromatics it might contain.

I cannot post the url but if you search for MPL Aguarras simil you should find the product page.

Do You have any recommendations on what to burn here in Spain? I am in the Valencia region and have had little luck finding something like kerosene or naphtha. I have read that automotive gasoline isn't ideal for burning, but many people do burn it. I'm not sure if auto gasoline would be better or worse than aguarras simil. What do you think?
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Old 01-12-20, 07:29 AM
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I don't know how to properly upload a file. The product page also contains the data sheet.

Thanks
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Old 01-12-20, 07:42 AM
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unfortunately I can't help, but what I can suggest is to look at the bike touring website , Crazy guy on a bike, and do some searching around for either the fuel name, or specifically some Spain searches and stove type and name searches.
Hopefully you might find some references.
When I travelled in Latin America, I used CGOAB journals as references for where I could find alcohol to use in my simple Trangia stove, and what types of stuff was available and how it burned etc.

In the end though, your stove is made to use reg gas etc so perhaps just go with one of the known fuels, although kerosene and gasoline are all going to have smell issues etc, but you may have to live with this, especially if you are concerned about the stoves functioning/cleaning/soot issues.

good luck, and if you are Spanish, buenos suertes hombre.
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Old 01-12-20, 01:52 PM
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The Primus Omnifuuel II can use fuels other than turpentine, so have you tried those? Try using regular gasoline/automotive petrol, alcohol (try shellac thinner from your local paint store, its an ethanol/isopropyl alcohol mixture), or kerosene/paraffin (also at a paint store, its used for clean-up of oil-based paints). There should be enough of those that you don't have to use turpentine, and most should be more widely available in Spain (or anywhere in Europe) than turpentine.

Also try a Primus gas canister (compressed butane/propane mixture) if you need to. Its a more expensive overall, but more convenient for short trips and trips where you just boil water.
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Old 01-12-20, 05:13 PM
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This might help:
https://www.msrgear.com/blog/stove-f...reign-country/

I am not familiar with the Omnifuel II, I have the original Omnifuel. I suspect they are about the same.

I was unhappy with it on Kerosene, but it did work. Primus said it would work on Diesel, I tried it on Diesel Number 2 (not sure if Diesel Number 1 or 2 are sold as such in Spain), it worked dismally poor on Number 2. I suspect that Diesel Number 1 which is closer to Kerosene specifications might work better. Jet A might work too, but I suspect you have no source for jet fuel.

When I used Kerosene in it, I found that I had the best luck using one part Coleman fuel and two or three parts Kerosene. That mix primed much better than straight Kerosene. When I used that mix, I used the Kerosene Jet, not the white gas (or I refer to it as Coleman fuel) jet. If I recall correctly, the Kero jet is marked 28, the gas jet 37 and the butane canister jet is labeled 45. But, since I have the original Omnifuel and you have teh Omnifuel II, maybe the jets are different?

As far as I know, there is no Jet for Alcohol. Alcohol can damage some plastics, and I have no clue if Primus used parts that will not degrade with alcohol, thus I would avoid alcohol unless Primus specifically says it is ok to use. If Primus says alcohol is ok, they might suggest a jet to use.

Most of my Kerosene use was in a Optimus stove, not the Primus, and I frequently clogged up some of the fuel passages in the burner head and had to disassemble the stove for unclogging. Overall, I think I have only about 2 or 3 more liters of kerosene remaining in my kero fuel can, once I have run out of Kerosene, I plan to just use Coleman fuel instead. i can buy kerosene for less than $4 USD per gallon but it is not worth the hassle of clogged up stoves, I plan to switch to Coleman fuel only after I run out of kero.
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Old 01-14-20, 04:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Masjaf View Post
Hello,

I am looking for some advice regarding the burning of MPL brand mineral turpentine here in Spain. The label says white spirit although it seems to contain smaller chain alkanes.

I am using the Primus Omnifuel II. I have already been burning the fuel without too much soot for some time, but I had to use the warranty service to replace some parts after the stove started malfunctioning even with regular maintenance. I am concerned about health effects and if it perhaps damages the stove parts.

I have attached the data sheet of the product (unfortunately it is in Spanish). It doesn't seem to contain any additives but I am unsure about the small part of aromatics it might contain.

I cannot post the url but if you search for MPL Aguarras simil you should find the product page.

Do You have any recommendations on what to burn here in Spain? I am in the Valencia region and have had little luck finding something like kerosene or naphtha. I have read that automotive gasoline isn't ideal for burning, but many people do burn it. I'm not sure if auto gasoline would be better or worse than aguarras simil. What do you think?
There are a wide range of petroleum distillates that are somewhat similar. White gas (CAS number 68410-97-9) that is used in camping stoves is the distillation cut that boils from about 3C to 195C. Mineral turpentine (CAS number 8052-41-3)...aka mineral spirits, white spirits, Stoddard solvent as well as others...has a higher distillation cut of 150C to 205C. That makes it less volatile at higher temperatures which means it may be a little more difficult to light on fire. Energy wise, it probably gives off about the same heat but it will just be a little harder to make it burn. That shouldn’t be a problem in a pressurized stove. It may also be a bit more sooty than white gas, especially on start up.

Health-wise, it is slightly less toxic than white gas because more of the aromatics have been removed. The aromatics are what make petroleum fuels toxic.
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