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Observations on Weight Loss

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Observations on Weight Loss

Old 09-13-19, 12:40 PM
  #426  
itsivxx
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Originally Posted by Milton Keynes View Post
Gonna take more than 10 miles on my bike to burn off a meal. If Strava is anywhere near accurate, it says I burn maybe 250 calories after riding 10 miles. That's about a candy bar's worth of calories.
One big difference is I ride a 2003 Dyno Roadster Stretch that's 47.7 pounds and 88" long. Twice the weight of most bikes out there in this world



My everyday ride
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Old 09-13-19, 01:47 PM
  #427  
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Originally Posted by OBoile View Post
Good post. I've had similar thoughts as you about the ride length. A long ride where you're fuelling isn't going to be the most efficient way to create a caloric deficit. You're taking 2 steps forward, but one step back. Shorter rides that can be done without any caloric intake are likely a more efficient use of your time.
I'm going to test this theory out with a sample size of one (myself) after my century this weekend. With the century over, I'll probably be doing fewer long rides, and mostly 30 miles and less--especially as the weather changes and I transition more to indoor training. And I'll just bring water or Nuun Sport (which has like 15 calories per tablet, I believe).
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Old 09-13-19, 11:44 PM
  #428  
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Originally Posted by radroad View Post
I've lost about 5 lbs this year. I've done very little riding. Maybe once or twice a week, tops. The weather doesn't help, and I'm being smart recovering from tendonitis.


Oddly enough, I lost zero weight riding 100-150 miles a week last year while car-lite. This year in just a couple of months, I've lost 5 lbs effortlessly. Here's the thing. When I ride regularly, I allow myself to eat more. I eat foods that are higher in fat. Net result: zero change in weight. This year, I'm riding a lot less. However, I'm more careful with what I eat. I figure, since I'm not riding very much, I can't afford to eat snacks or larger meals. The downside of course, is that I'm not as strong of a rider, but that's also obviously due to my recovering from tendonitis, which can take months.


Conclusion: exercise makes me stronger, but it's not making me any skinnier. Ironically, less exercise makes me skinnier. Psychologically, exercise that makes me sweat leads me to believe I've worked harder/burned more calories than exercise where I don't sweat like hiking, walking or weight training.


Interestingly, the forms of exercise where I don't sweat much may be much more healthy since they are all weight bearing forms of exercise. I'm not sure what the future holds as far as how much riding I do. I still enjoy riding obviously, but disappointed it hasn't worked out as far as weight loss.


For reference I am currently 165 lbs, but my "ideal" weight is closer to 150 lbs, my weight in college.
I suppose people are different, no expert, never was heavy. I am 5-10 and 156 pounds, 29" waist, 42 inch chest and I am 65yo. The heaviest I have ever been in my weight lifting era was 190 and in my marathon era 150. I weigh now what I weighed as a senior in HS, 156 pounds. I do not eat. It is simple. I am not growing anymore, three pieces of diet jelly toast and one glass of diet OJ for breakfast, nothing for lunch but four apples to snack on, two turkey burgers for dinner with carrots and water. Coffee in between.

You can work out until hell freezes over and not loose a pound if the food intake is not reduced. It is not practical to exercise enough, consistently, to loose weight from exercise alone, the mouth must close, the food intake must stop. Really simple, garbage in, you get fat. Do not eat anything and you stay skinny. Every day counts.

I knew we would get around to blaming the USA for everything bad. GMOs baloney, steroids that they pump into the critters, that is a concern. My observation, vegetarians and anti-GMO folks are often overweight and out of shape. One of my best friends, was skinny as a rail and is all about that stuff and somehow manages to continue to gain weight. We have been genetically modifying our critters and crops since we crawled out of the equatorial forests of Africa, whats new, we just figured out how to do it in a few years what took a few hundred before, yawn. I hate being an educated person in science in a world of here say.

Last edited by Loose Chain; 09-13-19 at 11:55 PM.
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Old 09-14-19, 10:04 AM
  #429  
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Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
I've lost 10 lbs since this time last year, from 160 to 150 lbs. I'm 5'11" so I wasn't overweight before, just a little waistline pudge. My optimal weight as an amateur athlete in my teens and 20s was 145. I'm close to that.

I wasn't trying to lose weight. But my thyroid failed last year and I couldn't metabolize alcohol. A single drink gave me hangover like symptoms within an hour or so, which I'd never experienced before. I had to give up beer. That was hard. I love beer. I don't drink much, and didn't always keep any at home. When I did a six pack might last a week or two, sometimes a month. But I enjoyed casual group rides with friends and a beer or two afterward.

That's the main diet change. I just gave up beer.

I cut back a bit on the junk carbs like cookies, muffins, etc., and substituted protein/energy bars. If I do eat any junk snacks I do it just before or during bike rides to burn off the extra calories. But I'm not rigid about it. I'll have a chocolate malt with my burger even on rest days, or an occasional cookie or donut. But I'm careful to not make a habit of it.

Other than that I eat whatever I want. I don't worry about cholesterol. I don't do keto or any special diet.

I had surgery to remove thyroid cancer last November, half my thyroid. The other half isn't working so my energy is still low, despite the meds. In most folks I know who have low thyroid problems they tend to gain weight and blame the thyroid problems. When I've observed their diet habits the real problem was eating too much junk food -- lots of candy, sugary snacks, sodas, ice cream. Their main problem was depression and low energy, feeling worthless and unable to work or do much of anything. Perfect conditions for self-medicating through comfort food. I sympathize completely. But it's not the low thyroid alone that caused obesity -- I'm talking double their normal healthy weight, like women who should weigh 160 lbs or less but now weigh more than 300 lbs. That's not "low thyroid." That's due to compensating with junk food. Then they stop walking or doing anything because it's too difficult to lug around that much weight. Pretty soon they're using motorized wheelchair carts in Walmart. Then electric scooters at home. Everything aches so they're convinced they shouldn't do any exercise at all, ever. It becomes self defeating.

My heaviest was 205 lbs almost 20 years ago after car wreck injuries made it impossible to get much exercise for awhile. I ate way too much junk food. Never cared much for soda but did drink beer -- not too much but when you don't exercise at all any beer is junk calories.

I got down to 175 by 2015 when I resumed bicycling. The weight came off gradually after that, without any rigorous dieting.
I recently learned that Hashimoto's disease is a diabetic-related illness. Diabetes is often misdiagnosed as Hashimoto's. You probably already know this but I made this comment just in case. I'm glad to hear you've cut down your carb and alcohol consumption and lost a lot of weight because that's critically important for people with these symptoms.

Last edited by Clem von Jones; 09-14-19 at 10:11 AM.
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Old 09-14-19, 12:09 PM
  #430  
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Originally Posted by Loose Chain View Post

Snip

You can work out until hell freezes over and not loose a pound if the food intake is not reduced. It is not practical to exercise enough, consistently, to loose weight from exercise alone, the mouth must close, the food intake must stop. Really simple, garbage in, you get fat. Do not eat anything and you stay skinny. Every day counts.
OTOH, back in June I roughly doubled my mileage and other than dropping my once per week indulgence of two donuts, I made no conscious diet changes. I dropped 13 of the 15 lbs that was my goal. Exercise works for me.

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Old 09-14-19, 02:31 PM
  #431  
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To all the posters who say that exercise isn't effective for weight loss. You are doing it wrong and choosing wrong exercises...Here is a little challenge for you: Do a total of 150-200 kettlebell swings with a 70 pound kettlebell 3-4 times per week...and then come tell me that exercise isn't effective for weight loss.
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Old 09-14-19, 03:12 PM
  #432  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
To all the posters who say that exercise isn't effective for weight loss. You are doing it wrong and choosing wrong exercises...Here is a little challenge for you: Do a total of 150-200 kettlebell swings with a 70 pound kettlebell 3-4 times per week...and then come tell me that exercise isn't effective for weight loss.
Dear Mr. Wolfchild, my report regarding your suggested experiment will have to be delayed until after I am discharged from orthopedic rehab

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Old 09-14-19, 05:57 PM
  #433  
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Originally Posted by Clem von Jones View Post
I recently learned that Hashimoto's disease is a diabetic-related illness. Diabetes is often misdiagnosed as Hashimoto's. You probably already know this but I made this comment just in case. I'm glad to hear you've cut down your carb and alcohol consumption and lost a lot of weight because that's critically important for people with these symptoms.
Hashimoto's is an oddball autoimmune disorder that mimics many other illnesses and masks itself pretty well without targeted blood tests. Nobody knows for certain what causes Hashimoto's. The theory is that there's a genetic predisposition triggered by another illness, virus, etc. I was a nurse in the 1970s-'80s, including doing hemodialysis, and there was always a risk of exposure to HIV, hepatitis and other diseases. I do recall a bout with Hepatitis A in 1981 -- got it from my kids, who got it at daycare. Knocked me out of college for the rest of the semester. Felt like the worst case of flu ever. Hep A doesn't seem to have the same lifetime debilitating consequences as Hep C, which singer Naomi Judd contracted as a nurse and which finally weakened her to the point she had to retire.

And in 2006 I had another bout with what felt like Hep A, although it might have been *****gitis (why is BF word filter blocking a common disease like m e n i n gitis?). At the time I was unemployed, still recovering from a 2001 wreck that broke my neck and back, so I didn't have health insurance. I just ignored most illnesses and toughed it out. I recall being pretty sick for a few days with symptoms similar to my 1981 bout with Hep A. At the time I was spending a lot of time at a children's hospital where a cousin's baby was kept for most of his first year after being born with a serious heart defect. There were outbreaks of both Hep A and *****gitis that winter and the baby was in isolation. Mostly I took turns with other family visiting to help support his young parents, both in their late teens at the time. On a few occasions late at night the only entrance to the main hospital was through the ER, which was a terrible idea -- every visitor was potentially exposed to communicable diseases just walking through the ER. Later the hospital changed that policy and provided a separate late night entrance with a security guard. Anyway, after that illness I stopped going to that hospital for a few months, since just coming into contact with other family might indirectly endanger the baby.

Maybe those were triggers, but there's no way of knowing. I'd already been diagnosed with Hashimoto's in 2001, confirmed by an internist around 2015 who urged me to see an endocrinologist pronto. But I was too busy taking care of my mom, who had Alzheimer's. So I neglected my thyroid problem until 2018 when I had surgery to remove the cancerous lobe.

Diabetes is just one of many possible complications, but the two aren't necessarily linked. There's no history of Type 1 or juvenile onset diabetes in my family. Everyone in my family with Type 2 developed it from bad diets, eating way too much sugar. When they cut back on the junk food they improved. But hardly any of them managed to control it for long. They always resumed eating junk food for the same reason alcoholics drink and drug addicts use drugs.

When I was a kid in the 1960s I was diagnosed with hypoglycemia and for years I was conditioned to believe it was some sort of genetic disease. But looking back objectively, nope, it was just a poor diet. We were pretty poor at times when I was a kid. Since I was a normally active kid, skinny as a toothpick, I'd burn through what little we ate, then I'd crave sugar for energy. Then I'd get the sugar rebound crash. When I got older and we were doing better financially, and my diet improved, those symptoms vanished.

If it's a "disease," it's a disease in the same sense as alcoholism and drug addiction are "diseases". They're self inflicted. I'm not saying there aren't genetic predispositions or psychological conditioning factors that cause the cravings. But the consequences are directly related to consumption, and don't occur in the absence of sugary junk food, booze and dope.

Every few months I crave a beer with pizza, BBQ or Mexican food. Sometimes I can get away with drinking a single beer. Other times I'm reminded why I shouldn't drink at all. I had a light beer with pizza a couple of weeks ago and had what felt like a hangover for the next two days from a single beer. Not really worth the misery.
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Old 09-14-19, 06:44 PM
  #434  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
To all the posters who say that exercise isn't effective for weight loss. You are doing it wrong and choosing wrong exercises...Here is a little challenge for you: Do a total of 150-200 kettlebell swings with a 70 pound kettlebell 3-4 times per week...and then come tell me that exercise isn't effective for weight loss.
70 seems like a lot
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Old 09-14-19, 07:16 PM
  #435  
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Originally Posted by Flip Flop Rider View Post
70 seems like a lot
It's a decent weight, but not excessive. If you're doing KB swings properly, you're using your glutes and hamstrings to generate most of the force. These are large powerful muscles capable of lifting large amounts of weight.
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Old 09-14-19, 07:27 PM
  #436  
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Try a Meal Journal

Apologies if already in the thread, but freely admit I didnít read all 18 pages.

I find I am most effective when wanting to lose weight if I keep a meal journal. By this, I mean write down everything you eat, every day, and for each item log the calories, the protein count, carbohydrates count, and fat content (all in grams). Good to track when consumed as well. Itís kind of a pain at first, but once you get most things you eat accounted for, itís really easy as you already have the numbers. Apps can make it even easier.

Figure out how many calories you roughly burn daily (usually goes by your weight and your daily routine - some online guides can help).

Goal is to ingest less calories over all than you expend. Every 3500 calorie offset = 1 pound. So in a week, if you consume 17,500 calories, but burn 24,500, youíll drop about 2 pounds (water weight not withstanding). If youíre doing exercise that builds muscle, you may actually gain weight, but drop body fat (harder to track). If you want to eat more, burn more calories through exercise. Watch the protein/carb/fat ratios of your daily diets to help even more with weight loss. Ideal ratios for varying goals can be found on line.

I have seen people do this and they hadnít realized they were ingesting 3-4K calories a day - mostly fat and carbs.

Iím getting ready to start tracking/logging my diet again as I want to drop 15-25 (currently at 220) and canít seem to get there. Yes, Iím 62, but I walk 2 dogs 5 miles 3 times a week, and 3 miles on 2-3 days more. (1 dog for 2 miles, 1 for 3 on five mile days, 1 and 2 on the others). Recently (Sep 3rd) got first bike in 45 years and been out 5 times, last for 5.86 miles at 12.8 mph for 27:27. Nothing special, but Iím certainly not sedentary, so itís likely Iím not paying enough attention to what Iím shoveling into my mouth!

Not an expert in nutrition by any stretch, just sharing personal experience.
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Old 09-16-19, 06:24 AM
  #437  
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I have used apps that track calories and it doesn't seem to help me. I know that makes no sense but I think I've figured out why. But, back to basics for a moment. I have used the on-line formulas to determine what my calorie intake should be to maintain 180 lbs. I am currently about 187lbs. It usually comes out to around 2500 cals. I mentioned this to my MD and she said, "Nope. For you, around 1800 calories." Turns out she is right. Here's the problem for me....once I set up a statistical standard, I get caught up in "Well I can eat 1800 cals." And, that's what I try to do. Of course my calorie count isn't always as accurate as you might think. I also start thinking I should eat according to the typical breakfast-lunch-dinner routine. So, the schedule becomes my guide. Lately, for reasons too lengthy to go into, I've gotten off schedules and stats. I no longer categorize meals as breakfast, lunch and dinner. I eat when I'm hungry. Maybe I have "breakfast" and maybe I don't. I also don't categorize foods by meal ie: breakfast food (think eggs). If it's 4 pm and I feel like having oatmeal, I do. I have also stopped equating the feeling of "not full" with "hungry." To the extent that I'm eating food I enjoy and not worrying about calories it's working in that I'm not gaining weight. I've stayed in the 186-188 lb range. What is perplexing to me is that I've cut alcohol by 75% in my diet and it doesn't seem to have had any affect on weight. At this point in life (age 73) I'm fit, weigh about what I weighed playing football in college and am pretty convinced that my body is not going down to 180 lb. So, no calorie counting and no obsessing over numbers on the scale. Just riding and paying attention to well being.
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Old 09-16-19, 11:48 AM
  #438  
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Americans don't just gain excess fat, they also LOSE a lot of muscle mass and muscle tone. I went to a cycling club meeting recently and almost everyone present were older, probably retired folks. They all had skinny arms and legs and sunken chests. Most however had large, pot bellies. In other words, they had cardio vascular endurance, but were otherwise very weak and on top of that, just looked plain awful.

Sitting in a draft is easy. Weight resistance training is hard.
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Old 09-16-19, 04:37 PM
  #439  
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Originally Posted by radroad View Post
Americans don't just gain excess fat, they also LOSE a lot of muscle mass and muscle tone. I went to a cycling club meeting recently and almost everyone present were older, probably retired folks. They all had skinny arms and legs and sunken chests. Most however had large, pot bellies. In other words, they had cardio vascular endurance, but were otherwise very weak and on top of that, just looked plain awful.

Sitting in a draft is easy. Weight resistance training is hard.
That's one of the main reasons why I do resistance training is because I don't want to end up skinny fat...Yes weight training is hard work, it's uncomfortable, sometimes painful but it's well worth it. The older we get the more important it is to lift weights.
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Old 09-16-19, 04:44 PM
  #440  
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Originally Posted by radroad View Post
Sitting in a draft is easy. Weight resistance training is hard.
That's why I'm a wakeboarder. Full body workout and it's fun. No reason for great exercise to be hard, or a chore.
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Old 09-16-19, 07:10 PM
  #441  
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Again, it's all down to calories in < calories out.
Yup. How you choose to go about it is a personal choice. So far it's worked for me using MyFitnessPal. Just an awareness of what I was eating has helped a great deal. I'm down to 210. I've lost 23# since March. Would love to get to 199# and no longer be a Clydesdale.. even if it it's only for a day.
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Old 09-17-19, 09:02 PM
  #442  
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I've plateaued again at 10 lbs under my weight from last year. Clearly, I'm going to have to eat less, and I'm not exactly jazzed about this.
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Old 09-18-19, 10:35 PM
  #443  
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As far as I can tell, there are only two adult demographics in the U.S. in which the majority are of normal weight: college students 18 to 25, and military. This is discounting professional athletes of course.

Every other group of adults has a clear majority which are overweight or obese. This even includes young adults just entering the job market in their mid 20's. The percentage of young adults under 30 who are seriously overweight is alarming.

Just the other day, I saw a college aged gal at the cafe. She had two large bags of takeout, which I assumed were for 2 or 3 people. She at it all herself! A large salad, a large sandwich, two rolls, and a large drink.
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Old 09-19-19, 02:15 AM
  #444  
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Originally Posted by radroad View Post
I've lost about 5 lbs this year. I've done very little riding. Maybe once or twice a week, tops. The weather doesn't help, and I'm being smart recovering from tendonitis.


Oddly enough, I lost zero weight riding 100-150 miles a week last year while car-lite. This year in just a couple of months, I've lost 5 lbs effortlessly. Here's the thing. When I ride regularly, I allow myself to eat more. I eat foods that are higher in fat. Net result: zero change in weight. This year, I'm riding a lot less. However, I'm more careful with what I eat. I figure, since I'm not riding very much, I can't afford to eat snacks or larger meals. The downside of course, is that I'm not as strong of a rider, but that's also obviously due to my recovering from tendonitis, which can take months.


Conclusion: exercise makes me stronger, but it's not making me any skinnier. Ironically, less exercise makes me skinnier. Psychologically, exercise that makes me sweat leads me to believe I've worked harder/burned more calories than exercise where I don't sweat like hiking, walking or weight training.


Interestingly, the forms of exercise where I don't sweat much may be much more healthy since they are all weight bearing forms of exercise. I'm not sure what the future holds as far as how much riding I do. I still enjoy riding obviously, but disappointed it hasn't worked out as far as weight loss.


For reference I am currently 165 lbs, but my "ideal" weight is closer to 150 lbs, my weight in college.
You don't state male or female, and weight without height is meaningless. We don't know if the weight is at 5'4 or 6'9. For the record, losing weight is about diet. And no, you don't get to ear more when you exercise. That would defeat the purpose. Besides, there's enough fat on the average body to fuel any exercise. Since your weight isn't grossly abnormal, it probably better to know you percentage fat and adjust your diet from there.
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Old 09-19-19, 07:46 AM
  #445  
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Originally Posted by radroad View Post
As far as I can tell, there are only two adult demographics in the U.S. in which the majority are of normal weight: college students 18 to 25, and military. This is discounting professional athletes of course.

I'm in the Navy. You are technically over weight if your BMI is 27.5 or higher. I think BMI, in general, is 25.0 or higher to be considered overweight but the Navy uses 27.5. At my command, most of us are over the maximum weight and have to be taped It's only a little over half, but that's still sad. Everyone at my command has an office job, so that certainly doesn't help.

The military is definitely less fat than the populace at large. I think the overall obesity rate for the US is about 40% and it's 17% for the military.
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Old 09-19-19, 05:31 PM
  #446  
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Amazingly, world champion level chess players burn three THOUSAND calories a day just sitting and playing chess!

https://www.espn.com/espn/story/_/id...-playing-chess
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Old 09-19-19, 08:36 PM
  #447  
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Click bait.

Anybody that's already in good shape will burn more calories than someone who's not even while just sitting. I also suspect there's a lot more detail than meets the eye since he also follows a strict diet, and I suspect stimulants may also be involved as well. Even so, he is an anomaly and that's not going to work for other 97% of the population.

Last edited by KraneXL; 09-20-19 at 08:41 AM.
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Old 09-20-19, 08:26 AM
  #448  
Flip Flop Rider
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when you feel fat go for a ride. when people are telling you, you've lost too much weight cut back
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Old 06-16-20, 04:51 AM
  #449  
Rachel Ross
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Yes guys it is true that exercises help to lose weight but my mother always says that if you want to lose weight then eat less. There is, however, a theory, what you eat is what you are and if you eat healthy food obviously your body will be and feel healthy. I recently found a Noom cost method that sounded interesting and even though I personally never believed in weight loss programs, to my amazement it went well and I lost 9kg in 3 months. You do not lose weight fast but the effect is amazing because effective weight loss has a lasting effect. I encourage you to try it. Down with the unwanted weight!

Last edited by Rachel Ross; 06-22-20 at 06:27 AM.
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Old 06-16-20, 07:07 AM
  #450  
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Originally Posted by Rachel Ross View Post
Yes guys it is true that exercises help to lose weight but my mother always says that if you want to lose weight then eat less.

All due respect to your mother, but I found that if I maintained a higher level of activity, I actually lost about 40 pounds while eating a bit more. Everyone is different in this regard.
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