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Got Flat Tire Twice a Day riding my bike

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Got Flat Tire Twice a Day riding my bike

Old 10-20-19, 06:27 PM
  #51  
Homebrew01
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Originally Posted by Witterings View Post
This will be what I do from now on rather than trying to repair on a ride ... the only exception ... the last flat I got was 50 meters from a pub with a nice garden on a hot sunny day .... I was more than happy to sit and do a repair in the garden .... sanding down the seam whilst sipping a cold one....
I might have pretended to have a flat !
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Old 10-21-19, 11:35 AM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
I always take the tire off the rim when I get a flat, even if I'm repairing the flat roadside. You need to do this to make sure there isn't anything inside the tire that's puncturing the tube, not just the rime. An example that happens to people a lot is the very thin metal wire that ends up on the road after a car tire bursts. That can work its way into your bike tire and really not be visible from the outside of the tire. Small sharp pieces of glass can do this as well.
++1

Been there, done that. Nothing visible from the outside of the tire (typically some wire or staple or other piece of fine metal worn down). Nothing even visibly obvious on the inside...however, when I run my fingers around the inside of the tire I inevitably run across a sharp point and, sure enuf, it's my tire flattener
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Old 10-21-19, 11:47 AM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by Homebrew01 View Post
I might have pretended to have a flat !
I just pretend I need to charge my phone. The props for that little drama fit nicely on the table.
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Old 10-21-19, 01:05 PM
  #54  
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Run your hands through everything and whatever makes you bleed is what is causing the flats... seems to work for me.

I had this problem on a trailer with a composite wheel. Zero spoke holes, two flat tubes in a row. IIRC was flashing from the plastic casting process cutting my cheap tubes. Strangely the original tube was fine for years.
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Old 10-21-19, 02:01 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
I just pretend I need to charge my phone. The props for that little drama fit nicely on the table.
Wait, why is there any need to pretend anything at all? It's not like anyone cares either way, and lying to oneself is silly too.
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Old 10-21-19, 02:31 PM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by subgrade View Post
Wait, why is there any need to pretend anything at all? It's not like anyone cares either way, and lying to oneself is silly too.

Pretty sure we're both joking about excuses. I do enough riding that I never feel bad about stopping. Going places is my incentive for riding distance. A few months ago, on a 140 mile ride, I had a pretty good lunch at the 70 mile mark, but decided I wanted something better, so I rode a few miles and had a second lunch. First time I ever had a dynamite sandwich, and I had it at the place in Woonsocket that claims to have invented it (the Castle). I did charge my phone during both lunches, btw.
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Old 10-21-19, 05:28 PM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by subgrade View Post
I have once used super glue with ok results. It can be done as a temporary fix for tiny holes, super glue will bond to almost anything; you just have to cut also the patch real small (like 5mm in diameter) to minimize the adverse effects of it hardening. However I still do not recommend it as a permanent solution.

Regular rubber cement though works very well if applied correctly, as described before.
I rode in a fundraising event once that had experienced people taking care of rider issues or flats. I am not an experienced super rider...in my late 60’s and try to do 50 miles/week. The gentleman that took care of my flat, removed the tube from the tire by segments looking for the puncture. There was nothing obvious on the tire. After taking the entire tube out inspecting and trying to find the puncture in the sides and outer aspects of the tube and not finding one he immediately said “must be the rim tape”. He looked...,and he was correct. I learned a valuable lesson and now unless I find a puncture on the tire or obvious one in the tube, I immediately check the tape.
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Old 10-21-19, 06:41 PM
  #58  
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I would also take the tire into a bike shop to have the spokes checked, they can get loose and cause trouble. Make the tire get out of round and rough riding or set it up to fail. Had one get loose and actually wreck the rim by cracking it. Added to the fact my fingers are bent and arthritic I take it into the shop to be fixed now. It helps to be good friends with the shop owner.
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Old 10-22-19, 02:29 AM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by Marci View Post
I would also take the tire into a bike shop to have the spokes checked, they can get loose and cause trouble. Make the tire get out of round and rough riding or set it up to fail. Had one get loose and actually wreck the rim by cracking it. Added to the fact my fingers are bent and arthritic I take it into the shop to be fixed now. It helps to be good friends with the shop owner.
While this is somewhat off topic, I'm highly sceptical a loose spoke could crack a rim. I'd think it's the overtensioned ones that do that. Not that I'm an expert on this, I've only had cracked rim once , but I'm pretty sure there were no loose spokes before that happened.

Regarding my recent punctures I mentioned earlier, the patched tube that was punctured through both sides by the wood screw (no less than 4 holes altogether), has been holding fine so far. The front one that made me leave the bike at the pub, was a mystery though. Since it went flat soon after I pinch-flatted the rear one, I was pretty sure the front one had similar albeit less severe damage. Turned out that no, it was a single hole on the center of inner side, but the rim tape was completely fine, no excessive tube stretch at the spoke holes, no sharp edges or cuts, also no debris or anything. Strange. That makes three unrelated flats in two days.
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Old 10-22-19, 04:42 AM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by Rstyle View Post
I rode in a fundraising event once that had experienced people taking care of rider issues or flats. I am not an experienced super rider...in my late 60’s and try to do 50 miles/week. The gentleman that took care of my flat, removed the tube from the tire by segments looking for the puncture. There was nothing obvious on the tire. After taking the entire tube out inspecting and trying to find the puncture in the sides and outer aspects of the tube and not finding one he immediately said “must be the rim tape”. He looked...,and he was correct. I learned a valuable lesson and now unless I find a puncture on the tire or obvious one in the tube, I immediately check the tape.
If you can't find the leak, you can overinflate the tube a little while it's out of the tire. You may ruin the tube, but finding the location of the leak can help you figure out the source of the puncture to correct it before putting in a new tube.
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Old 10-22-19, 06:54 AM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
If you can't find the leak, you can overinflate the tube a little while it's out of the tire. You may ruin the tube, but finding the location of the leak can help you figure out the source of the puncture to correct it before putting in a new tube.
I may be missing something obvious but......what makes the tape move out of place. In my case it had “bunched up” in one place causing partial exposure of the spoke hole. Does it occur when you are placing a new or repaired tube?
I was into maybe the 35-40 mile of my ride when it happened.
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Old 10-22-19, 07:56 AM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by Rstyle View Post
I may be missing something obvious but......what makes the tape move out of place. In my case it had “bunched up” in one place causing partial exposure of the spoke hole. Does it occur when you are placing a new or repaired tube?
I was into maybe the 35-40 mile of my ride when it happened.
Yes, most probably it moved while mounting the tire. It just took some time to rub a hole in the tube.
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Old 10-22-19, 10:00 AM
  #63  
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Multi flat tires

In the summer I always seem to get more than one flat inner tube. The thorns, are the problem and around here they seem to show up in the heat. One day went down a sidewalk and got 10 thorns on each tire flattened both my tires. No spare inner tube,had buy that day and was not to happy. I think s good way to prevent flats is to double up the old inner tube with the new .If your tires are wide enough for two innertubes making thicker to prevent puncture of anything going through it
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Old 10-22-19, 10:34 AM
  #64  
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On any wheel, I always cover the spokes with a layer of water-proof electrical tape and then a layer of vinyl tape. A Mr Tuffy goes in against the inner tire wall and the tube, heavy duty in the middle. Gone years without a flat
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Old 10-22-19, 11:47 AM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by mjd420nova View Post
On any wheel, I always cover the spokes with a layer of water-proof electrical tape and then a layer of vinyl tape. A Mr Tuffy goes in against the inner tire wall and the tube, heavy duty in the middle. Gone years without a flat
is the vinyl tape typical rim tape?
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Old 10-22-19, 11:48 AM
  #66  
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so, typical rim tape and tuffy's or tuffy's in place of the regular rim tape?
thanks
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Old 10-23-19, 10:57 AM
  #67  
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Both, regular vinyl electrical tape, any color to cover the thick water proof tape that covers the spokes. The Mr Tuffy goes on the outside of the tube, inside the tire.
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Old 10-23-19, 09:04 PM
  #68  
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Originally Posted by Rstyle View Post
I may be missing something obvious but......what makes the tape move out of place. In my case it had “bunched up” in one place causing partial exposure of the spoke hole. Does it occur when you are placing a new or repaired tube?
I was into maybe the 35-40 mile of my ride when it happened.
This is exactly why I use coloured rim tape. anything other than black. That way when i mount the tire and tube I can check the tire before inflating it to make sure it's not sitting on any part of the tube. Also, with coloured rim tape i can see if the rim tape has shifted.

Cheers
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Old 10-24-19, 05:41 PM
  #69  
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Originally Posted by Cheez View Post
Thanks for the tips guys.. that's good call.

And has anyone tried using super glue to patch these tubes? The regular cement glue seems too weak in bonding. Wouldn't super glue work better? To ensure seal and quick bonding?
Yes super glue is good patch will never come off with it.
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Old 10-25-19, 12:05 AM
  #70  
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I also use tire liner. Mrtuffy. Got 1 puncture after 2 years.
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Old 11-12-19, 12:16 PM
  #71  
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Originally Posted by Cheez View Post
It has been chaotic guys I thought I was losing my mind.. Since I had the wheels (used ones off ebay) and new tires installed I've been getting flats once or twice a day... Flat on the way to work and another flat on the way home. This has repeated pretty often even going out to the store... I got flats so many times I had to keep buying spare tubes all the time. There were a few times I had to walk push my bike home because I ran out of spare tube and the flat tire patch kit wouldn't work.. both the glueless and traditional patch are worthless as the bonding is too weak... there were times I had multiple punctures at a time too.

The cost of having to keep buying spare tubes negated the savings on buying a set of used wheels for my bike. By the way flats was only happening on the rear and not the front.

A week ago I finally decided to take the plunge by taking the tire off the wheel and inspect.... I felt like I was a detective. I found out that the rim tape inside the wheel was not covering all of the spoke holes....the tape job was a mess. I wasn't sure if this was the cause for having flats... I checked on google and it says you "will" get flat if those spoke holes are exposed. I didn't have a rim tape so I used the duct tape, cut out in small square or rectangular shape to patch these holes... After I have finished I put on my fresh spare tube and pumped up air... been riding my bike and haven't got any flats since then. I recently got me a bike cargo trailer and one of the wheels kept losing air...eventually flat. That wheel also had spoke holes not properly covered by the rim tape too so I patched thst up as well. The tube near the valve was starting to crack also. Just giving you guys heads up to inspect your wheels for spoke hole exposure... they can be very destructive and make your life unpleasant.
I might suggest buying Continental Gator Hardshell Duraskins or the Continental Gatorskin clincher tires. With the latter, I have NEVER had a flat, ever! There are many clinchers that are lighter, with less rolling resistance, a better 'feel' (more like a tubular), but most all of the road riders that I regularly cycle with use the Gatorskin tire. And, of course, be sure to have rim tape covering all of your spoke ends before installing the tube and tire. When the tube starts to crack, whether it be by the valve or anywhere else, replace it. The tube is the inexpensive part of the wheel. Good luck!
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Old 11-12-19, 12:57 PM
  #72  
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Originally Posted by sterlingsam View Post
I might suggest buying Continental Gator Hardshell Duraskins or the Continental Gatorskin clincher tires. With the latter, I have NEVER had a flat, ever! There are many clinchers that are lighter, with less rolling resistance, a better 'feel' (more like a tubular), but most all of the road riders that I regularly cycle with use the Gatorskin tire. And, of course, be sure to have rim tape covering all of your spoke ends before installing the tube and tire. When the tube starts to crack, whether it be by the valve or anywhere else, replace it. The tube is the inexpensive part of the wheel. Good luck!
Yeah that's what I have, Gatorskin clincher tires... seems like a nice set of tires it feels durable. Since I got the inner rim holes covered up with duct tape I never got a flat again. I even gone through some broken glass and other metal debris on the road with no issues at all. The duct tape I used was a heavy duty thick one...not this skinny one that's easy to tear. Is Gatorskin tire considered pretty light tire in bicycle tire industry today? I'm wondering
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Old 11-12-19, 01:04 PM
  #73  
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Originally Posted by Cheez View Post
Yeah that's what I have, Gatorskin clincher tires... seems like a nice set of tires it feels durable. Since I got the inner rim holes covered up with duct tape I never got a flat again. I even gone through some broken glass and other metal debris on the road with no issues at all. The duct tape I used was a heavy duty thick one...not this skinny one that's easy to tear. Is Gatorskin tire considered pretty light tire in bicycle tire industry today? I'm wondering
No, they're considered pretty heavy, the tradeoff for durability.

The other super-durable ones are Schwalbe Marathons (a lot of different ones at different price ranges), which I think ride a bit better than the Gatorskins. I don't think I;ve managed to flat either the Gatorskins or the Marathons.

Stay warm, buddy! Looks like a long winter.
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Old 11-12-19, 01:09 PM
  #74  
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Originally Posted by Cheez View Post
Yeah that's what I have, Gatorskin clincher tires... seems like a nice set of tires it feels durable. Since I got the inner rim holes covered up with duct tape I never got a flat again. I even gone through some broken glass and other metal debris on the road with no issues at all. The duct tape I used was a heavy duty thick one...not this skinny one that's easy to tear. Is Gatorskin tire considered pretty light tire in bicycle tire industry today? I'm wondering
Gatorskins are considered either the best thing to happen to bikes since rubber, or the worst thing to happen to bikes since the automobile, depending on who you ask.

Pros: They're extremely puncture-resistant.

Cons: They're heavy, hard to mount, have no traction, and ride about as smoothly as a cement-filled garden hose.

YMMV.
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Old 11-12-19, 01:37 PM
  #75  
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Originally Posted by ksryder View Post
Gatorskins are considered either the best thing to happen to bikes since rubber, or the worst thing to happen to bikes since the automobile, depending on who you ask.

Pros: They're extremely puncture-resistant.

Cons: They're heavy, hard to mount, have no traction, and ride about as smoothly as a cement-filled garden hose.

YMMV.
The cons are a wee bit exaggerated, but the Conti Grand Prix 4000 is almost as durable and a whole lot more fun to ride. Just a bit more expensive.
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