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Shimano vs. Campy

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Shimano vs. Campy

Old 10-30-19, 05:18 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by nomadmax View Post
He's talking about having the right hand brake lever operate the front brake like Euro bike racers have been doing since the 60s, maybe even further back than that. I'm not familiar with Shimano shifters but it's nothing more than running the front brake cable to the right lever with Campy. Even though I ride motorcycles, I keep my right lever as the rear brake because I'm right hand dominant and the rear doesn't have as much mechanical advantage as the front (longer cable run).

With the way Shimano works, I don't think braking hard and sweeping the cogs into a lower gear is really a viable option (if the right lever were set up to be the front brake). One or the other functions would be compromised given that the brake lever serves two functions (braking and downshifting). With the front brake lever on the left it would lend itself better to braking with the front (left side) and down shifting (right side) at the same time.
Mechanical advantage shouldn't be an issue; it's not that hard to lock up the rear. Modulation could be a reason, though.

Braking hard and sweeping the chain onto larger cogs not only works, it works so well I'm sure that's the whole point of the swinging brake lever. Japanese riders have their front brake on the right, no? As for needing both hands to perform this move, what if you're holding your water bottle, or carrying say, milk home from the shop?

Originally Posted by AndyK View Post
When you are braking hard, you are not pedaling. Makes shifting at the same time difficult at best!
It's a piece of piss to lightly pedal during this move; it's not necessary to transmit any drive.

Originally Posted by Rides4Beer View Post
I have never shifted the FD while braking, but ok.
Who's talking about the FD?
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Old 10-30-19, 06:04 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post

Braking hard and sweeping the chain onto larger cogs not only works, it works so well I'm sure that's the whole point of the swinging brake lever. Japanese riders have their front brake on the right, no? As for needing both hands to perform this move, what if you're holding your water bottle, or carrying say, milk home from the shop?
I doubt thatís the whole point of the swinging lever. Regarding right/left side, I doubt you knew this about Japanese bikes until I mentioned it. The only way I knew is because Iíve lived there. If I had to guess, it probably stems from their motorcycle culture, not because it makes more sense one way or the other. Regardless, no one is suggesting you change your bike back. If it works for you, go with it. Be safe, hold on to that milk
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Old 10-30-19, 06:23 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by pickettt View Post
If it works for you, go with it.
I'm not some sort of morphological freak; if it works for me, it can work for most. Or, at least, most folks who have the front brake on the right... might be a bit tough to modulate the rear properly with a dual pivot there and no load like a rack or something.

But give it a try - I'm pretty sure it should be easy with a bit of practice. It feels so damn slick. Don't tell me Shimano didn't mean it until you try it.

FTR - I greatly preferred Ergos until I discovered this trick. I still prefer the other brands somewhat, not just for their relative simplicity and robustness, but mainly because Shimano cable pull is too small IMO. On my three bikes I have Campy, SRAM and Sensah.

Last edited by Kimmo; 10-30-19 at 06:26 PM.
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Old 10-30-19, 07:06 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by MagicCyclist View Post
Merlin Cycles offers a Dura Ace R9100 rim brake groupset for 1160 euros, while buying parts seperately (from Merlin Cycles too) I can get a Record 12spd group for 1214. What should I buy? Keep in mind that I will have to buy BB cups for the Record (I have Shimano BB cups from my older bike).
If you are in the US then Campy is your only option....
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Old 10-30-19, 07:15 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post

But give it a try - I'm pretty sure it should be easy with a bit of practice. It feels so damn slick. Don't tell me Shimano didn't mean it until you try it.
I didn't tell you that's not what Shimano intended, I just doubt it. The Japanese also drive on the other side of the car and the other side of the road....

Like I said, do what you're comfortable with.

Last edited by pickettt; 10-31-19 at 06:34 AM.
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Old 10-30-19, 07:27 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by pickettt View Post
Like I said, do what your comfortable with.
Why would I need that advice? It's just a euphemism for yeah sure pal, whatever - isn't it?

I'm trying to flag there's totally a flipside to all those folks saying that shifting with the brake lever feels weird and wrong - it's as if I'm the only one who actually sees the point of it.
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Old 10-30-19, 08:08 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Wilmingtech View Post
If you are in the US then Campy is your only option....
Not really all that bad. Mind you, not sure what all exactly was in the Merlin groupset that the OP referenced, but 1160 Euros = ~$1300; $150 more gets you something bought in the US.. presumably with Shimano USA warranty. No worry about duties being charged also.

https://www.texascyclesport.com/shim...ed-time-offer/
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Old 10-31-19, 06:30 AM
  #33  
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I look forward to a time when I am required to emergency brake while simultaneously shift the front to a different ring. Cant say I have come across anyone needing to do this combo move outside of bikeforums, so it may be a long time before I can.


I imagine it will be during some sort of bank heist where I am trying to get away on a bike- skidding out to cut thru alleys and whatnot.
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Old 10-31-19, 08:39 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post
Who's talking about the FD?
Misread, saw "big cog" and thought you were talking about accidentally shifting the FD while braking with the front brake on the left.
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Old 10-31-19, 10:56 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by Rides4Beer View Post
Misread, saw "big cog" and thought you were talking about accidentally shifting the FD while braking with the front brake on the left.
I made the same mistake, then thought more and realized it wasnt a mistake- its how Kimmo phrased the comment. Then figured i again misinterpreted it, but then couldnt think of how else he meant it.

After reading the comment for an 8th time(7 more than I should have), I think he is saying that with the front brake on the right, a rider could brake and shift at the same time?
1- that isnt correct, right?
2- Why couldnt I just engage the front brake with my left hand and shift the rear with my right? That would accomplish the same thing as he is suggesting, right?

Anyways, glad I am not the only to be totally confused as to the purpose of swapping F and R brakes.
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Old 10-31-19, 11:23 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
2- Why couldnt I just engage the front brake with my left hand and shift the rear with my right? That would accomplish the same thing as he is suggesting, right?
Because you are also apparently carrying milk home from the store
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Old 10-31-19, 09:28 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by Rides4Beer View Post
Because you are also apparently carrying milk home from the store
Maybe that, maybe you just took a swig from your water bottle.

This is why I'm not a fan of eTap. You should be able to do all the important stuff with one hand.

Peeps are like, why? I'm like, why the hell not? As if it isn't better.

How about someone give the brake & shift an actual try before any more pooh-poohing, huh? Like I said, although it makes more sense with the front brake, it should probably still be worthwhile with the rear.

I live in a country that pretty much killed utilitarian cycling with moronic mandatory helmet laws, but surely in places not befouled by such idiocy, it's more common for someone on a road bike to carry something home a few blocks? In this scenario an eTap bike is totally crippled. A bike with USAnian brakes, you choose if you want to be able to brake properly or shift (I always opted for shifting, but it was sketchy AF).
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Old 11-01-19, 06:42 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by DaveSSS View Post
Chorus 12 is a great option if you don't want or need the lowest weight group. Functionally, there's no difference between Chorus and the higher level groups. The shift lever are now made of black coated aluminum, instead of carbon fiber and the crank lacks the fancy clear coat finish of Record and SR. Chorus offers a new 48/32 crank and an 11-34 cassette, which is what I chose for the steep hills in norther Colorado. The hills on my rides are far worse than most mountain slopes. I got my groups from pinkjersey.com.
Roger that, and thanks.
One day I'm favoring Chorus 2X12 (48/32-11/32) and the next morning I'm back to ponderin' the 1X idea with plus rims/tubeless...plenty of hills on our side of the divide tho I've been riding the fatty on 4.6" wide rubber & some XC skiing (LOL, October snowfall has set all records so there is plenty of time for a decision during the 2nd half of ski/skin/tele/classic/skate/snowshoe/fatty season).
(lastly, as a new member/reader I'm struck how some (many) of these thread posts have become a blood in the water, snark fest).

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Old 11-01-19, 08:04 AM
  #39  
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1x makes no sense for the road. The jumps between the sprockets are too large and the top gear ratio is too low. Leave 1x to the off road bike.
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Old 11-01-19, 08:13 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by DaveSSS View Post
1x makes no sense for the road. The jumps between the sprockets are too large and the top gear ratio is too low. Leave 1x to the off road bike.
I.Y.O.
(I'm mostly a trail rider and ride 1X12 on rigid fatbike 52 wks and those 2T jumps on the small end of the cassette don't bother me much as one may just bump up the cadence some-like on a mtb trail).
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Old 11-02-19, 11:15 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by MagicCyclist View Post
Merlin Cycles offers a Dura Ace R9100 rim brake groupset for 1160 euros, while buying parts seperately (from Merlin Cycles too) I can get a Record 12spd group for 1214. What should I buy? Keep in mind that I will have to buy BB cups for the Record (I have Shimano BB cups from my older bike).

EDIT AFTER READING COMMENTS: Well, my hands are small so I will go with Campy. Thumb shift won't be that hard to get used to I believe. My new frameset will be a C64 so Shimano would be way out. Anyways thanks for helping me out!
No brainer, go with Campy. Better looking, longer lasting and rebuildable plus higher resale.
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Old 11-03-19, 02:39 PM
  #42  
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You can get gouged petty hard for Campy spares.
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