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When are you too old to ride?

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Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

When are you too old to ride?

Old 11-25-19, 10:43 PM
  #101  
RaylComp
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Im 60. Just a year ago, I had a hip replacement. This June, I replaced a bunch of rubber on my 1977 Rayleigh Competition that have not ridden since 1986 and started to ride again. Since the end of July, Ive spent 630 mi in the saddle. Not so fast, but getting faster and enjoying every ride.
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Old 11-26-19, 03:14 AM
  #102  
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Originally Posted by eja_ bottecchia View Post
Thank you for the info, I appreciate knowing as much as I can before seeing the hand doc.

I looked at the CMC device on Amazon and you are right it is pricey.

I notice that the discomfort is spreading to every day activities. It sucks getting older.

Again, thanks for all the good info.
One word: resistance training. The single best way to reverse the signs of again.
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Old 11-26-19, 06:02 AM
  #103  
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Keep On Truckin'

Just keep on riding for as long as you enjoy it! I just turned 75, and I'm still at it. Rode with my son and granddaughter in the Hilly Hundred into my late 60s. In the words of the MLB pitching great Satchel Paige, "How old would you be if you didn't know how old you was?"
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Old 11-26-19, 06:29 AM
  #104  
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Eddy says

Originally Posted by epnnf View Post
At 64, I recently realized I can't do the things I used to do. Now, I ride shorter distances, ride a little slower, use a lower gear when standing on steep hills. Makes me wonder what the future will be like. Recumbent? E-bike? There will come a day when I'm too old to ride at all. Alternative sports? Shuffleboard? Walking? Blogging?
Ride as much or as little,or as long or as short as you feel, but RIDE. Eddy Merckx
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Old 11-26-19, 08:05 AM
  #105  
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Originally Posted by CHK View Post
Ride as much or as little,or as long or as short as you feel, but RIDE. Eddy Merckx
I think it's clear that with good mental facilities, age has little to do with cycling outside of the effects of diminishing strength. I'm 66 and just took up the hobby in April. I've logged something over 3000 miles so far and can see doing it for the long haul. I've met a lot of folks into their 80's who are logging many more miles than me and certainly at faster avg speeds too.
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Old 11-26-19, 08:55 AM
  #106  
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My 90+ year old uncle rode Tour de Tuscon in 2010...our goal was not to be beaten by him! He rode daily until he broke his hip and the doctor (and family) told hi he needed to stop. No Lycra, no fancy bike...department store mountain bike, sneakers and Bermudas...
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Old 11-26-19, 09:01 AM
  #107  
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You old folks inspire.

At 69 the thought of not riding - well,.... it just never entered my mind.
Buying another Euro vintage to fix & ride, now That's The Ticket !

Heres a couple of AustroDaimlers to finish this winter. VentNoir + Michelle.


Last edited by Wildwood; 11-26-19 at 09:13 AM.
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Old 11-26-19, 09:41 AM
  #108  
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This subject came up last night. We were celebrating (or bemoaning) an upcoming birthday.

Riding my age isn't really a problem for me (at this point, anyway), so someone suggested I should make it a point to ride double my age until I couldn't do it anymore. And that got me thinking ... when is that going to happen? Am I going to be able to ride 140 miles when I'm 70? 150 when I'm 75? 160 when I'm 80?

Who knows what happens between now and then. A terrible crash. A terrible diagnosis. Anything. Maybe I just don't want to do it anymore.

But save that, I intend to try or know the reason why.
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Old 11-26-19, 10:48 AM
  #109  
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50+ Biking: Therapy and Recreation

At age 70, after a long sedentary (but still involved) career, I strongly desired to return to my youthful biking days (a 1966 Louison Bobet road bike...still have it). Biking an hour a day in 15-20 minute sessions around the subdivision does wonders for my arthritic knees, hips & back as well as my spirit from being outdoors. As I continue to work on weight loss (keto and intermittent fasting) and strength training at the local gym, my goal is to do longer rides with my younger bike enthusiast brother. I have built and modified 4 bikes ('95 Cannondale Caad 6, '80 Fuji steel road, newer Marin cruiser frame and a 7' long "frankenbike" of Trek 850/Schwinn World traveler cut apart & welded together) to all have a crank forward, flat foot stance to help knees, hips and any balance issues (both feet on the ground when stopped) as well as easier mounting with a lower saddle. I did this with fabricated alloy plates, sliding dropouts (to extend the wheelbase & lower bottom bracket), struts to the rear brake mounts, and laid back seat posts. Thus I have 4 different handlebar positions, gearing, crank lengths, and saddle setbacks for 4 different short workouts. I was very inspired by the post showing Robert Marchand cycling competitively at age 105. Riding has been, is and will be a true life saver for me. To my fellow senior riders.....ride on. Keeps you happy and on the green side of the sod!!
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Old 11-26-19, 11:11 AM
  #110  
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I became interested in trikes after seeing some articles on the trike sport (casual as well as professional racing) in Great Britain. They are exclusively diamond frame lightweights. Inspired, I built a diamond frame trike from an old steel Fuji frame and aftermarket rear conversion kit. I used a cassette rear axle/hub as a driver giving me 6 speeds (dropped 2 of 8 for a spacer and drive cog). The lessons: being long legged on a tall frame and 70 years old, it was very difficult to mount and felt very "tippy" going over any irregular surface as well as the typical trike tendency of fighting the steering from a single drive wheel. So.....I built Trike 2.0 from an alloy Marin stepthru frame. I fabricated a "differential" with 2 axles, 2 freewheels and a machined alloy "cage" allowing drive force to either rear wheel. I was able to widen the rear track with alloy spacers and substantially lower the saddle with a fabricated laid back saddle mount (from an old alloy mountain bike frame) and lower bottom bracket by playing with the rear adapter frame mounting. The riding character was night and day difference (as well as shedding a lot of weight). I use this in Michigan winters now (great on snow and ice) and I have an alternate ride if/when I can no longer ride my other 4 two wheelers......but I will never stop riding.....something!
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Old 11-26-19, 05:38 PM
  #111  
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One of the great bikes I've had is an Austro-Daimler Inter10. It had Shimano 600 on it, a precursor to Ultegra. It got stolen out of my apartment, total bummer, but that led to have a custom frame made back in '81 by Bill Davidson, and I still have that bike (well my son does anyway.)
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Old 11-27-19, 04:01 PM
  #112  
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My aim is to be found pulled off the bike path at the age of 102, cooling out with a smile on my face.
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Old 11-27-19, 04:38 PM
  #113  
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I've raced against 70+ yr olds in USAC Masters crits and road races, and the National Senior Games has an 80+ division. You're too old to ride when you give up.

Don't give up.

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Old 11-28-19, 02:20 PM
  #114  
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Originally Posted by Wobblewheel View Post
I love all the well written and thought out responses. I am 62 and felt my body weaken overnight as s result of a mini stroke. I stopped riding a few years ago, when it hurt to ride my oldskool racing bikes. And turned into a dedicated couch potato.
I have recently bought an upright posture, short reach, compact frame geometry bike to relieve pressure on my hands. Its a single speed 34 x 16 thats easy to spin, yet still climb small hills. The bike feels lively, and while is fully rigid, absorbs a decent amount of shock with easy rolling fat 29er x 50 tires, platform pedals enable me to find a knee freindly position and I strive to maintain a cadence around 80 to build a smooth and efficient pedal spinning style. Now I look forward to riding pain free like a kid again! Been riding it several times a day from 2 to 10 miles each time. Wake up n go for a quick ride, do a local errand under 5 miles..evening ride after dinner...point is that I'm having fun, exploring local areas close by the house, getting off my butt, socializing and feeling good about my efforts to get more fit, stretch, make better food choices.
So, my contribution as a non athletic, somewhat older guy to this thread is to say:
get out and make it easy n fun to re experience the simple joys of riding your bike, and keep the rides short at first, n try to ride in a spirited manner. Buy something new if that sparks your enthusiasm, especially if your current bike doesnt fit or its a rusty outside clunker....OMG, there are so many cool bikes on the market today...new and used. I love the clear head and increasing muscle fitness not to mention a little socializing.
Wobble, that's great that you had the courage to pry your butt off the couch after a stroke. I imagine that not many people respond in such a life-affirming manner.
If I can't shake the wrist pain, my next plan is to try different bars on my best bike, with more neutral positioning.
ps Happy Thanksgiving riders! I'd be out there but it's gusting to 25mph and is otherwise steady at 20mph all day today. I'm tough, but not that tough!

Last edited by CrankyFranky; 11-28-19 at 02:21 PM. Reason: spilling
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Old 12-04-19, 07:23 AM
  #115  
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I've been having some trouble riding and thought I had reached the end of the road. Recently I was looking around on Amazon and found training wheels for adults. I should get them next week, it sounds like exactly what I need to use while I ride and strengthen.
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Old 12-04-19, 09:10 AM
  #116  
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Originally Posted by Lucillle View Post
I've been having some trouble riding and thought I had reached the end of the road. Recently I was looking around on Amazon and found training wheels for adults. I should get them next week, it sounds like exactly what I need to use while I ride and strengthen.

My wife and I custom built STABILIZER WHEELS for adults some 25+ years ago when we also customized bicycles for children with Spina Bifida and Cerebral Palsy. The 2 that I linked are similar to our design; however, what MUST BE taken into consideration when riding with the stabilizers is that since they are not active in design they do not allow the bike to lean into a turn. This inability to lean can cause a crash if making a turn too tightly or too fast.

Ride safely and enjoy.

https://www.amazon.com/CyclingDeal-A...s%2C449&sr=8-6


https://www.amazon.com/BIKE-USA-Stab...s%2C449&sr=8-8
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Old 12-04-19, 11:04 AM
  #117  
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OldTryGuy, the first one you pictured is the one I bought. I have owned several tricycles and it seems to me that once I install these training wheels the bike will act like a trike. So turns with these should be similar to turns with trikes?
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Old 12-04-19, 04:06 PM
  #118  
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Originally Posted by collcs View Post
The lessons: being long legged on a tall frame and 70 years old, it was very difficult to mount and felt very "tippy" going over any irregular surface as well as the typical trike tendency of fighting the steering from a single drive wheel.
An advantage purpose-built (upright, 'diamond' frame) trikes have over conversions is that, with no worry about grounding a pedal in a turn, the bottom bracket and therefore the entire frame and riding position can be lower, improving stability.
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Old 12-04-19, 05:04 PM
  #119  
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Originally Posted by jackb View Post
I'll be 72 in a few weeks and have definitely felt my age over the last few years. I continue to cycle, hike, and ski, but I have more aches and pains and I experience reduced stamina. This is what aging is all about. My usual rides nowadays are around 20miles, and my hiking is down to between 10 and fifteen miles on a given hike. I ski, both downhill and cross-country, regularly, but I have shortened my days for these activities. I plan on continuing all my outdoor activities until I can't do them anymore or until they are no longer enjoyable. so far so good. I don't look ahead.
I think this is the key. Just do what you're doing today. If tomorrow you can't, then maybe that's it.
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Old 12-04-19, 05:51 PM
  #120  
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Originally Posted by Lucillle View Post
OldTryGuy, the first one you pictured is the one I bought. I have owned several tricycles and it seems to me that once I install these training wheels the bike will act like a trike. So turns with these should be similar to turns with trikes?
Close to a trike but the higher center of gravity on the bike will require a bit more finesse while turning.
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Old 12-04-19, 07:32 PM
  #121  
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I'm 64 in 5 days (December 10). I've found that I'm slower than I used to be but I still have to slow down when riding with most cyclists. Not bragging, just ride alot more than they do. Most other riders are very surprised when they find out how old I am. I put in 3,100 miles in 2017, 4,200 in 2018, and will have about 3,00 again by the end of this year. Would be more but I took a part-time day job as a courier for a local healthcare organization to supplement our retirement income. However, it gives me opportunity to commute on bikes 2 or 3 out of 5 workdays a week with a 25 mile round trip. I frequently do 30-40 mile rides and often stretch out the commute home.

Still riding and plan to keep on! Alternative sports? - nah, I plan to keep riding with my g'kids as I get older. Bought a couple of very nice Felt F24 Junior road bikes for them this year and my eight year old granddaughter is my new riding buddy She loves her road bike! Her brother is trying to grow into his. It's a little big for him still. I just hope they keep the pace down as I get older.
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Old 12-04-19, 09:40 PM
  #122  
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Originally Posted by OldFartCyclist View Post
I'm 64 in 5 days (December 10). I've found that I'm slower than I used to be but I still have to slow down when riding with most cyclists. Not bragging, just ride alot more than they do. Most other riders are very surprised when they find out how old I am. I put in 3,100 miles in 2017, 4,200 in 2018, and will have about 3,00 again by the end of this year. Would be more but I took a part-time day job as a courier for a local healthcare organization to supplement our retirement income. However, it gives me opportunity to commute on bikes 2 or 3 out of 5 workdays a week with a 25 mile round trip. I frequently do 30-40 mile rides and often stretch out the commute home.

Still riding and plan to keep on! Alternative sports? - nah, I plan to keep riding with my g'kids as I get older. Bought a couple of very nice Felt F24 Junior road bikes for them this year and my eight year old granddaughter is my new riding buddy She loves her road bike! Her brother is trying to grow into his. It's a little big for him still. I just hope they keep the pace down as I get older.
Just keep on riding. I'm 64 too and I was faster than ever at 63 and I only slowed down because of family issues so I didn't get to ride nearly as often as I had the year before. I put 4800 miles on in 2018 and I'm at 3000 now for 2019. I won't hit 4000 for sure, maybe 3300 if I keep going. I did a 50 miler here in Brooklyn then a 45 miler 2 days later in San Fran, and I felt like I could've done another 50 that day but it was going to get dark, all just 3 weeks ago. I've been on the trainer mostly since then as the weather has turned.
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Old 12-05-19, 06:49 AM
  #123  
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at least a day after your last rites. okay, maybe two...just for recovery purposes.
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Old 12-05-19, 08:11 AM
  #124  
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Originally Posted by ooga-booga View Post
at least a day after your last rites. okay, maybe two...just for recovery purposes.
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Old 12-05-19, 10:30 PM
  #125  
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Originally Posted by tcs View Post
An advantage purpose-built (upright, 'diamond' frame) trikes have over conversions is that, with no worry about grounding a pedal in a turn, the bottom bracket and therefore the entire frame and riding position can be lower, improving stability.
Diamond frame trikes (mostly British made) usually have a standard pedal height....British trikes in particular are often ridden with the same speed and intensity as road bikes as well as on rural dirt roads and year round. I chose a conversion because it indeed allowed me to position the bottom bracket much lower. I fabricated a laid-back seat post/support assembly resulting in a very low riding height. I opted for the stepthru frame for ease of mounting. I really should post pics of both.....
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