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Bike rear wheel question

Old 04-30-20, 08:54 PM
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shine2000
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Bike rear wheel question

So I got the hubs adjusted on my wheels at bike shop but noticed the rear wheel spins for maybe 5 seconds then stops.it uses rim brakes and they were not rubbing at all.the front wheel spins freely will keep spinning so the front seems good but wonder if I should should worry about the rear wheel.they are also quick release and they are not too tight or loose also.
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Old 04-30-20, 09:11 PM
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That the chain off and then try.
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Old 04-30-20, 09:28 PM
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A rear wheel also has the slight friction of the free wheel/hub assembly.
Or they might be adjusted too tight?
A good reason to learn to do your own work.
Servicing the bearings with new grease certainly trumps a simple "adjustment".
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Old 04-30-20, 09:29 PM
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Yes, slip the chain off and spin the wheel to isolate whether it's a hub problem or bearing problem. I'm thinking that someone over pre-loaded the bearings, which is really a simple fix. Keep us posted with your findings please,
Edit, Hey I was writing first here.....haha
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Old 04-30-20, 09:36 PM
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Hub bearing adjustment can mean different things to different people. Many (and I suspect the shop that did these) will determine the axle spin/feel with the wheel out of the frame. As in no compressive force from a QR skewer being in play. Others will take the extra time and effort to confirm the resulting bearing spin with the wheels installed and in the frame they are intended for and with the QR skewers that will be used. This often means that the out of frame feel will be loose as the QR will compress the axle and tighten up the bearing adjustment when in the frame.

So when you picked up the wheels did the axles spin easily with no play in hand? If so then one "method/result" was satisfied. trailangel makes a good point about the freewheel/freehub body adding it's friction to the system. Another experiment is to close down the QR levers part way and see if the spin changes. BTW what type of skewers are you using? Internal cam or exposed cam that rides on plastic? Andy
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Old 04-30-20, 10:33 PM
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It is probably done up a little tight. Loosen it a little, then see how it spins.
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Old 05-01-20, 12:19 AM
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Uh. If it happened right after you got your hubs adjusted... itís probably the hubs.

Pretty tough to do this kinda thing yourself unless you have the right kinds of wrenches. Then itís super easy. Just loosen it until it spins fairly easily, with a SLIGHT bit of play when the QR is not done, then tighten up the QR. Jiggle the wheel to make sure there is no play.
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Old 05-01-20, 03:37 AM
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Ok got cone wrenches from bike shop so hope I can figure it out myself now.will post later on to see if it helps!
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Old 05-01-20, 03:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
Hub bearing adjustment can mean different things to different people. Many (and I suspect the shop that did these) will determine the axle spin/feel with the wheel out of the frame. As in no compressive force from a QR skewer being in play. Others will take the extra time and effort to confirm the resulting bearing spin with the wheels installed and in the frame they are intended for and with the QR skewers that will be used. This often means that the out of frame feel will be loose as the QR will compress the axle and tighten up the bearing adjustment when in the frame.

So when you picked up the wheels did the axles spin easily with no play in hand? If so then one "method/result" was satisfied. trailangel makes a good point about the freewheel/freehub body adding it's friction to the system. Another experiment is to close down the QR levers part way and see if the spin changes. BTW what type of skewers are you using? Internal cam or exposed cam that rides on plastic? Andy
they were standard quick release skewers on a trek 2017 hybrid
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Old 05-01-20, 07:24 AM
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Originally Posted by shine2000 View Post
they were standard quick release skewers on a trek 2017 hybrid
Unless I were to search the bike's specs this answer isn't enough to say which type of QR you have. The "classic" kind, and what Shimano currently uses, has the cam enclosed inside the end cap. This has metal to metal contacts on the sliding surfaces and can produce a LOT of clamping pressure when used properly. The more recent type with the cam exposed and riding on a plastic curved base is limited in how much pressure by that plastic's compressive strength. Given that many bikes have vertical rear drop outs the QR often only needs to keep the wheel from falling out of the frame. The chain tension, from pedaling, is resisted by the drop out angle. Use one of these open cam types with a frame having horizontal drop out slots and the axle can easily slide forward on the drive side.

This amount of clamping force also effects the amount of bearing preload when the wheel is clamped in place. The enclosed type of QR will compress the axle (actually bow it more) and thus a good bearing adjustment will need to feel looser before clamping the QR to end up with the best in place one. The open cam type QR needs less of this initial slop as it won't add as much bearing tightening when clamped. Andy
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Old 05-02-20, 08:38 PM
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I figured out how to losen the cone nut nearest one to the bearings...the wheel spins longer and doesn't feel as stiff before....still side to side play will try to figure that out maybe tighen a little more.
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Old 05-02-20, 08:50 PM
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You are learning the balance between the spin and the slop. he final judgement is with the wheel secured in the frame. Andy
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Old 05-03-20, 07:03 AM
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Originally Posted by shine2000 View Post
I figured out how to losen the cone nut nearest one to the bearings...the wheel spins longer and doesn't feel as stiff before....still side to side play will try to figure that out maybe tighen a little more.
To do this well you need two each of 15 mm cone wrenches (13mm in front) and 17 mm combination wrenches for locknuts. Did you use the technique shown here:

A slightly loose bearing will wear faster than a slightly tight bearing. Zero play is your target.
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Old 05-04-20, 10:02 AM
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A convenient way to get the bearings adjusted correctly is to use an axle vise like THIS, which allows the bearing adjustment to be done while the axle is compressed by the quick release, as it will be when the wheel is mounted in the bike's frame. This saves you the nuisance of having to take the wheel back off the bike if you find the adjustment is not quite right. It's not an expensive tool.
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