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Where can I find an M10 fastener?

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Where can I find an M10 fastener?

Old 10-20-19, 07:27 AM
  #26  
Barry2 
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That bolt has to be at least M50 !

sorry could not resist.

Barry
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Old 10-20-19, 07:30 AM
  #27  
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Look at the stainless steel washers. They always seem to be half the thickness of regular steel ones.

If you need to sleeve the hole to reduce slop they have bronze bushings that might fit or tubing.
Bronze bushings
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Old 10-20-19, 07:49 AM
  #28  
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I usually use Bolt Depot for replenishing stock when it gets low.
I had used Fastenal in the past, but the last time I tried to order from them, they wanted to charge me an insane shipping charge to the local store.
When I just need a few bolts, I find best price from Chinese sellers on eBay, as long as I am not in a rush.
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Old 10-20-19, 08:22 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Barry2 View Post
That bolt has to be at least M50 !
Well, I do live in Texas
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Old 10-20-19, 08:28 AM
  #30  
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You guys have been a huge help! There's an Ace hardware not too far from me - that's actually the very first place I went looking for the bolt. They had more stainless fasteners than HD and Lowes but just not the right size. I will probably head back there in search of a bronze bushing, tubing or small washer to fix my slop problem.

Bolt depot. On the list for future fastener acquisitions.
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Old 10-21-19, 06:24 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Txthroop View Post
So I don't have any old axles around; West Marine doesn't have a 10mmx1.0 bolt; I didn't get to Fastenal before they closed for the weekend...however, I searched Home Depot online and found a store in the area that does have an M10x1.0mm bolt - 20mm long! I'll be there tomorrow.

Next question: 20 mm will be too long so I'll have to cut it down. I know from previous experience that cutting with a hack saw mangles the threads at the end. How do I clean up the threads so they will engage well with the eyelet on the frame?

One approach that occurred to me is to cut the bolt while it's screwed into the frame. Then maybe when I back it out, after cutting it to length, the threads in the frame will force any damaged threads on the bolt to the correct shape. This assumes that the steel of the frame is stronger than the steel of the bolt ( I have no idea if this is the case). Otherwise, the damaged threads on the bolt will only ruin the threads in the frame, which, obviously, I don't want. Is there a better way?
Buy a nut to go along with the bolt-thread the nut all the way onto the bolt--cut the bolt, unscrew the nut and it will take care of cleaning up the cut.
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Old 10-21-19, 07:33 AM
  #32  
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For the future:

mcmaster.com
grainger.com
mscdirect.com

If you can't find it there, you probably don't need it. Also, in some bigger areas they likely have a local distribution hub with a walk up counter. We have a Grainger local to us.
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Old 10-21-19, 08:59 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by freeranger View Post
Buy a nut to go along with the bolt-thread the nut all the way onto the bolt--cut the bolt, unscrew the nut and it will take care of cleaning up the cut.
Yep.

A file or very fine grinder can also help polish up the ends.
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Old 10-21-19, 09:06 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by MoAlpha View Post
Beat me to it. Not just stainless, but marine grade.
Looking at the picture, it occurred to me that stainless may not be the best application if the drop out is made of aluminum! Stainless fasteners installed into aluminum can initiate a electrolytic reaction causing corrosion. If this is not a bolt in tended to be removed regularly for maintenance, I personally prefer to use never-seize compounds rather than grease or even Loctite.
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Old 10-21-19, 09:26 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by elcraft View Post
Looking at the picture, it occurred to me that stainless may not be the best application if the drop out is made of aluminum! Stainless fasteners installed into aluminum can initiate a electrolytic reaction causing corrosion. If this is not a bolt in tended to be removed regularly for maintenance, I personally prefer to use never-seize compounds rather than grease or even Loctite.
Yep. Hence the advisability of a marine grade fastener. Zinc-coated SS is about the best you can do in the real world. Then, I'd probably use something like Tef-gel®.
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Old 10-21-19, 11:22 AM
  #36  
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Your local auto parts store usually has a selection of metric fasteners too.
Have bern successful in going this route in a pinch.
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Old 10-21-19, 12:22 PM
  #37  
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Man, who knew there was so much to consider when faced with a seemingly simple bolt issue! I'm really grateful for all the input though. Next time around this will be a snap.

I haven't been able to find a spacer or tubing of any kind to take up the slop between the bolt and the hitch so I'm going to put it together with the slack in there and see how much it moves. I'm hoping it will stay put if it's well-tightened. I'm expecting my new rear rack to arrive tomorrow and then I'll configure everything on that dropout at the same time: fenders, rack and trailer hitch.

Originally Posted by elcraft View Post
Looking at the picture, it occurred to me that stainless may not be the best application if the drop out is made of aluminum! Stainless fasteners installed into aluminum can initiate a electrolytic reaction causing corrosion. If this is not a bolt in tended to be removed regularly for maintenance, I personally prefer to use never-seize compounds rather than grease or even Loctite.
So, this particular bike is a Surly and I'm pretty sure their bikes are all steel from one end to the other. I do have an aluminum cross bike though. Would you recommend treating or replacing all the screws that are used on that frame - or any other aluminum frame?
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Old 10-21-19, 12:51 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Txthroop View Post
I haven't been able to find a spacer or tubing of any kind to take up the slop between the bolt and the hitch so I'm going to put it together with the slack in there and see how much it moves. I'm hoping it will stay put if it's well-tightened.
I've used my bench grinder to reduce the OD of spacers to fit in situations like this. Put the spacer on a rod and hold it against the grinding wheel. The spacer should spin on the rod while grinding, resulting in a more or less uniform reduction in diameter. Have a bowl of water nearby to quench the spacer and check the fit every so often.

N.B. recommended only for steel spacers; softer materials like aluminum or brass can clog the grinding wheel and make it overheat. You don't want that to happen, as the heat stress can shatter the wheel and send out high velocity shrapnel.
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Old 10-21-19, 12:52 PM
  #39  
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Any time you put two different metals in contact, you have a possibility of galvanic corrosion.
The likelihood depends on the difference in the anodic index of each.
Here is an explanation and a table of anodic indexes: https://www.engineersedge.com/galvanic_capatability.htm

That said, I have bikes with aluminum, steel, titanium, and carbon fiber frames
I use stainless bolts on all of them, and use blue Loctite on every bolt.
The Loctite prevents galvanic corrosion, and ensures bolts don't loosen up by themselves.
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Old 10-22-19, 06:50 PM
  #40  
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I remember a discussion about di-electric compound. I don't clearly remember if this would be a remedy against galvanic corrosion. Most thread compounds; loctite, grease, or never-seize probably prevent such corrosion. I suspect this is a greater problem in environments where salt is present- either winter salted roads or seashore air or weather. But I tend to err on the side of caution, especially sinceI ride vintage steel, some of it from the Seventies.
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Old 10-27-19, 05:30 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by Txthroop View Post
Finally found some online: https://www.boltdepot.com/Metric_tap...m_x_1.0mm.aspx I would still prefer to buy locally so I'll probably visit the Fastenal near me. Thanks for the help on this.

The above bolts are not stainless but maybe a good slather of grease would keep them from rusting for the foreseeable future.

That raises another question I've wondered about lately. I recently got an new, steel frame bike and I've added racks, front and rear. While installing the racks I wondered whether it was better to grease the threads of the screws I was using (the ones going into the braze-ons) or apply Loctite. I assume you can;t do both. I went with the grease because that's what I had in the shed, but for future reference, is it better to use thread locker?
I would just replace all these with stainless and forget about it.
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Old 10-27-19, 07:56 AM
  #42  
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Titanium M10 bolts HERE.
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