Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

First bike ride

Notices
Road Cycling ďIt is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.Ē -- Ernest Hemingway

First bike ride

Old 09-03-19, 07:04 AM
  #1  
cooperh
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
First bike ride

Hey guys,

Awhile ago I bought my first rode bike and I have been trying to convince myself to go ride it. Yesterday I was finally able to convince myself to go and it really wasn't as bad as I thought it was going to be. I had a couple quick questions, my legs are really sore which is really normal. However, my butt almost kind of hurts, I did buy some cheap bike shorts that I worse under my regular shorts ( felt weird wearing full gear) just because I knew if I didn't have any it would really hurt.

The bike is a Tomasso.

My question is, does it just hurt because it was my first time riding, not a very good pair of bike shorts, improper saddle, or possible position is wrong? I know it's a loaded question just curious what you guys thoughts were. (its like inbetween on the bones sorta say)

Thanks!

Last edited by cooperh; 09-03-19 at 07:25 AM.
cooperh is offline  
Old 09-03-19, 07:49 AM
  #2  
Sapperc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Lompoc, CA
Posts: 118

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix SL4 Comp, Trek 930, Nishiki International

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 7 Posts
Yes! And you also forgot to ask if wearing regular shorts over your cycling shorts can cause issues. Yes again!

Seriously though, there is a certain amount of saddle discomfort as you get used to cycling on a road bike. And youíll experience it any time you take an extended break from cycling. So until you get over the initial break-in discomfort it may be very difficult to tell what other issues may be contributing to saddle discomfort if you are not clear as to how to setup your bike for a good initial fit. Tons of information available on the various aspects of addressing saddle discomfort and initial setup for a starting bike fit. Your best bet is to do a Google search and check it out.
Sapperc is offline  
Old 09-03-19, 08:03 AM
  #3  
MSchott
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Farmington Hills, MI
Posts: 331

Bikes: 2017 Specialized Roubaix Sport SL4

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 20 Posts
The reason for good padded bike shorts is to provide padding for the typically barely padded bike seat preferred by seasoned riders. Just as important, the seams on these shorts are not noticeable and donít interfere with sensitive areas. Wearing regular shorts over them introduces those seams.

As said it will take some time to get used to riding but a good seat and quality shorts are vitally important.
MSchott is offline  
Old 09-03-19, 08:06 AM
  #4  
cooperh
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Sapperc View Post
Yes! And you also forgot to ask if wearing regular shorts over your cycling shorts can cause issues. Yes again!

Seriously though, there is a certain amount of saddle discomfort as you get used to cycling on a road bike. And youíll experience it any time you take an extended break from cycling. So until you get over the initial break-in discomfort it may be very difficult to tell what other issues may be contributing to saddle discomfort if you are not clear as to how to setup your bike for a good initial fit. Tons of information available on the various aspects of addressing saddle discomfort and initial setup for a starting bike fit. Your best bet is to do a Google search and check it out.
Thanks kinda what I was thinking, the shorts overtop i did cause I felt weird haha. As far as shorts go is it worth getting some new ones? The ones I have are just some handy downs that are kinda wore out so thought that might help. Looks like on Amazon Spoonzed are rated good and Dicks locally had Louis G. But they are about $20 more..
cooperh is offline  
Old 09-03-19, 08:16 AM
  #5  
WhyFi
Senior Member
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Got a castle in - er, Minneapolis, that's where I dwell!
Posts: 25,775

Bikes: 2016 Diamondback Haanjo, 2018 Trek Domane SL5 Gravel

Mentioned: 315 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9582 Post(s)
Liked 386 Times in 239 Posts
It's really hard to say; some kinds of pain/tenderness is common and will go away after you're acclimated to it. Other kinds of pain are not something that you'll get used to.

A saddle should support your structure - you should be able to feel good contact between your "sit bones" and saddle. Some tenderness of the tissue sandwiched between these points is pretty common; I found that it went away after two weeks or so worth of riding.

If you're a male, numbness of your manly bits is NOT something that should be ignored - it's not something that's you get used to, it's not something that goes away. Sometimes it's resolved by changing the tilt of the saddle slightly (most find that a flat position, or very slight upwards [back-to-front] tilt, works best). Sometimes you need a saddle with a cutout (or a wider cutout). Sometimes you need a wider saddle. Sometimes you actually need less padding (more padding can mean more squish for all of your fleshy bits).

Chafing is not something that you're going to get used to, either. The cause could be a poor chamois (the chamois provides a little cushion, but I'd argue that moisture management is its more important job) or too much saddle padding.

If you're not experiencing either of the above, I'd give it a couple/few weeks and see how it goes. If you're experiencing either of the above, I'd start with looking at saddles (which, I'm sorry to say, is sometimes a long, long process). Go to a shop with an Ass-o-Meter of some kind so that they can measure your sit bones and get you on the proper width saddle.
WhyFi is online now  
Likes For WhyFi:
Old 09-03-19, 09:08 AM
  #6  
eduskator
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 259

Bikes: TCR Advanced Pro 0

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 110 Post(s)
Liked 27 Times in 25 Posts
Originally Posted by cooperh View Post
Hey guys,

Awhile ago I bought my first rode bike and I have been trying to convince myself to go ride it. Yesterday I was finally able to convince myself to go and it really wasn't as bad as I thought it was going to be. I had a couple quick questions, my legs are really sore which is really normal. However, my butt almost kind of hurts, I did buy some cheap bike shorts that I worse under my regular shorts ( felt weird wearing full gear) just because I knew if I didn't have any it would really hurt.

The bike is a Tomasso.

My question is, does it just hurt because it was my first time riding, not a very good pair of bike shorts, improper saddle, or possible position is wrong? I know it's a loaded question just curious what you guys thoughts were. (its like inbetween on the bones sorta say)

Thanks!
My answer: Adaptation time. You have solicited muscles that weren't used to be & put stress on your body. It'll certainly hurt the first time, but your body will get used to it.

You would need what we call a ''fitting'' to make sure your bike is adjusted to your body. If it's not fitted properly, you could hurt your back, knees, etc. on the long run. Your bicycle shop should have done that when you bought it. Your glutes will also hurt & this is in part due to the stiff saddle & the improper shorts. You need good padding between your butt & that seat my friend! Oh and, these cycling shorts should be worn without any other piece of cloth over or onder them.

Give you body time to adapt. It's normal to be sore & to feel like you're going to puke your lungs. I remember how my first real ride was.

Last edited by eduskator; 09-03-19 at 09:14 AM.
eduskator is offline  
Old 09-03-19, 12:16 PM
  #7  
MSchott
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Farmington Hills, MI
Posts: 331

Bikes: 2017 Specialized Roubaix Sport SL4

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by cooperh View Post
Thanks kinda what I was thinking, the shorts overtop i did cause I felt weird haha. As far as shorts go is it worth getting some new ones? The ones I have are just some handy downs that are kinda wore out so thought that might help. Looks like on Amazon Spoonzed are rated good and Dicks locally had Louis G. But they are about $20 more..
Its important to get quality cycling shorts. There are dozens of threads here with recommendations. Expect to pay $50.00 at the low end but if you can afford better quality, itís worth the money.
MSchott is offline  
Old 09-03-19, 01:28 PM
  #8  
aliasfox
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 44
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
A. Your butt's gonna hurt for your first few rides. I've been riding for twenty years, and the first couple of rides of each season are always a bit sore. Sitting on a bike saddle isn't the same as sitting on a couch or even a wooden chair, where your whole butt supports your weight - on a bike, you're rotated much more forward, and your sit bones down there have to get used to the difference.

B. If you've gone out 3-4 times and it hasn't gotten much better, you may need a different saddle. Some bikes come with very aggressive saddles - about 130mm wide, with very little padding. Some bikes come with super wide cruiser saddles with gel and other things. Me, I prefer something in the middle. A ~140mm saddle with a bit of give seems to work best for me, and even something as close as a 132mm saddle just ended up not working. I would say that your saddle/positioning should be reasonably comfortable for a short jaunt around the neighborhood with or without cycling shorts. If you find that you can't cruise around for 5-8 miles on the saddle without feeling very uncomfortable, you're probably on the wrong saddle.

C. Shorts, like saddles, are a personal thing. Some people prefer thicker chamois, some thinner, and everyone has slightly different shapes, so be prepared to hunt for one you like. So far, I've found that I like a thinner, simpler chamois with a slightly more padded seat to a thicker chamois and a thinner seat. No Fi'zi'k Arione for me.

D. I've tried Performance, Pearl Izumi, and Amazon's Santic shorts. I was always a fan of the Performance shorts I had - one is worn to translucency, another was torn by an angry Specialized saddle, but I liked them both. The Pearl Izumi is nice too. The Santics have a weird waistband, and feel kind of floppy around my quads - there's significantly less compression there. Also, the chamois seems stiffer, which isn't too my liking. On the higher end, people seem to like Assos, but those are $$.

E. If you're just getting started and feel self conscious about being in lycra, might be worth trying out some mountain bike shorts - I believe they also have a chamois and a lycra leg, but have an outer shell that looks like regular shorts. You'd get much of the benefits of cycling shorts and still be comfortable stopping by your local brewery. Would still suggest regular cycling shorts for long distance though.
aliasfox is offline  
Old 09-04-19, 08:40 AM
  #9  
Sapperc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Lompoc, CA
Posts: 118

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix SL4 Comp, Trek 930, Nishiki International

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by cooperh View Post
Thanks kinda what I was thinking, the shorts overtop i did cause I felt weird haha. As far as shorts go is it worth getting some new ones? The ones I have are just some handy downs that are kinda wore out so thought that might help. Looks like on Amazon Spoonzed are rated good and Dicks locally had Louis G. But they are about $20 more..
Cycling shorts are very personal and youíll have to figure out what fits you and what chamois you prefer. I donít care for the ones you mentioned. Iíve had good luck with Bpbtti, Open Road and Areo Tech. But worn out cycling shorts need to be replaced.
Sapperc is offline  
Old 09-04-19, 06:51 PM
  #10  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 9,773

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 176 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3014 Post(s)
Liked 369 Times in 268 Posts
Ask any group of cyclists about saddle/sit bone comfort/discomfort and they all fall into two general categories:
  • HTFU and get used to it.
  • If it ain't comfortable after a certain point (time/distance), it ain't ever gonna be comfortable.

I'm in the latter group. If a saddle feels like an @$$ hatchet after 10 miles, no amount of adjustment or choice of shorts/bibs padding will help. I've lost 25 lbs since resuming cycling in 2015, back to my same weight as 40 years ago, and with less natural padding on the butt bones, saddle and clothing are more critical.

If a saddle feels pretty okay during a 10-50 mile ride but you keep thinking "Hmm... could be better," that's where little things can help: adjustments, choices of shorts/bibs. Especially if you keep shifting around on the saddle and find it's comfortable in some positions, but you keep sliding back into an uncomfortable position. That's clue number one that adjustment the saddle should help -- fore/aft, height, angle, etc.

Other than that, saddles are very personal and most folks I know tend to use the same saddles on every bike. Most folks I ride with prefer Fizik. I prefer Selle Italia or similar designs like the older Selle San Marco. My one exception is a newer style Bontrager Ajna gel women's saddle that I pulled out of the LBS bargain bin on a lark. It's wider than I usually prefer (145 rather than 130), with a wider cutout and more flexible shell. But it's darned comfy on my more upright steel road bike for longer, more relaxed pace rides.

Regarding shorts, get a pair of Przewalski shorts with the original orange 3D pad. It'll set you back a whole $15-$20. Best bang for the buck in cycling apparel. If every maker of custom high zoot pricey shorts and bibs used that same pad, I'd consider spending $$$ for "better" shorts and bibs.

The orange 3D pad is unlike anything else I've seen or worn. It's thicker, so expect a diaper look and feel. But it's dense, resilient, with a smooth surface texture that virtually eliminates pressure points and abrasion. It wicks perspiration better than anything else I've tried. After a long, hot, sweaty ride, the exterior of the shorts will feel damp but the pad fabric next to the skin still feels dry.

The shorts with white leg cuff cost a few bucks less and look okay with my white jersey. I bought the plain black shorts in summer 2018 when I was beginning to lose weight (long bout with illness, couldn't swallow solid food, so I was well nourished but rapidly losing body fat on a high protein low sugar/carb diet). At the time I weighed 160 and the medium fit perfectly. Now at 150 lbs I wanted a little more compression so the small size I got a couple of weeks ago is perfect -- more support for my lower back, hips and thighs, feels like I recover quicker from that burning muscle sensation after a hard sprint or climb. At 5'11", I've gone from 160 to 150, 32" to 30" waist. The medium shorts still fit, but with less compression.

I can't vouch for the Przewalski shorts/bibs with the newer 4D pad. Haven't tried 'em, don't feel any need to change because the original 3D was perfect. Reportedly some folks objected to the thick diaper look and feel. But after wearing the 3D pad for a year on weekly rides up to 60+ miles, it'll be my choice for as long as it's available. The shorts and pads have held up well with multiple handwashing and air-drying under a fan.
canklecat is offline  
Old 09-04-19, 06:57 PM
  #11  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 9,773

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 176 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3014 Post(s)
Liked 369 Times in 268 Posts
BTW, regarding the normal sore muscles, massage can help. My favorite bit of physical therapy gear is a heavy marble rolling pin I got from a flea market years ago as a bit of kitchen decor. The weight of the rolling pin does all the work on the tops of the thighs. Using it on hamstrings and calves adds a bit of arm work -- just feels like some light weight lifting. But the cool feel of the marble and weight works better than a foam roller or percussion massager on my legs after a long, hard workout.

Foam rollers are good too, but they take more work. Just using a foam roller on the back, legs, etc., demands contortions that become workouts -- not a bad thing for those of us who usually shun full body stretching and range of motion.

A heavy duty percussion massager with a long handle is fantastic for post-ride sore legs, neck, shoulders and back.
canklecat is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
copswithguns
Road Cycling
43
09-08-13 09:49 AM
SkippyX
Commuting
45
08-07-12 01:24 AM
BrazAd
Fifty Plus (50+)
38
05-05-11 03:51 PM
tandem130
General Cycling Discussion
22
10-13-10 06:41 PM
jasandalb
Road Cycling
5
07-26-10 07:42 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.