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Hybrid pedals. It's not C&V, but they'd be going on one.

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Hybrid pedals. It's not C&V, but they'd be going on one.

Old 10-08-19, 10:23 AM
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Hybrid pedals. It's not C&V, but they'd be going on one.

When I was at my not-so-LBS the other day I saw a set of Shimano EH500 SPD hybrid pedals.

I attempted to raise a zombie thread about these in general discussion, but most of the replies were from MTB folks. I can't imagine riding a MTB with clipless pedals, so those arguments against them didn't help me out much. I shouldn't be jumping rocks with my road bike.

Does anyone use these on a road bike? I'm considering clipless, but I don't know that I want to be committed to that full-time. Are they a good option for someone who might race in bike shoes but also wants to sometime just train in getting off the bike and running a long distance? Or are there better options?
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Old 10-08-19, 10:36 AM
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I have some similar to those on my mtb drop bar conversion (used almost exclusively on the road). They work fine, although because of the one sided feature, not quite as fast to enter.
For a pure road bike I prefer road pedals. I use old Looks that take Delta cleats. But that’s not what you asked...
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Old 10-08-19, 10:42 AM
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There are no hard and fast rules for which pedal type you want to use on what bike. I am of the opinion that riding a bike is a personal experience and how ever I want to configure the bike for my purpose is my choice. Others opinions are just that.

My MTB/commuter bike has those pedals and I like them a lot. My MTB shoes are used with that bike. All my road bikes, some of which I use for commuting, have Look Keo pedals using road shoes.

If I plan on doing something in addition to going for a ride that involves walking, I take the MTB/Commuter. I don't have a gavel bike yet, but it would likely use the EH500 too.

Note that there are multiple SPD pedals. Shimano designates the road version as SPD-SL.
https://www.cyclingweekly.com/fitnes...s-pedals-20941
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Old 10-08-19, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by due ruote View Post
I have some similar to those on my mtb drop bar conversion (used almost exclusively on the road). They work fine, although because of the one sided feature, not quite as fast to enter.
For a pure road bike I prefer road pedals. I use old Looks that take Delta cleats. But that’s not what you asked...
It is basically what I asked. It looks like newer models are weighted so that they'll rest in one position or the other--is that what's taking longer to enter with the one you have? I've been reading the complaints on the prior years models.
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Old 10-08-19, 10:48 AM
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I use the VP version of these on a bike and would buy more of them; VP-131, I think is what they are. Actually bought them for my wife but she is getting out of riding and I wanted to be able to ride in sandals occasionally and clipless usually. They work. I have several pairs of the VP-101 double clipless on other bikes.


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Old 10-08-19, 11:34 AM
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I use a mix of pedals

I have a pair of this type (wellgo/performance) (spd on one side/platform on the other) for a bike that I use for commuting (some times) and also to just jump on for errands and such on weekends. works well and if I miss the spd side when trying to clip in, like after a light, it is no problem use use the platform side to keep going and then clip in, so easy and pretty efficient

yesterday I got passed (not that hard to do) on the commute by a guy on a really high end carbon colnago. He was in full kit and using spd/platform pedals.

I also use spd and spd-SL I commute mostly on my nicest bike and use spd for commuting as it is a bit easier to clip in and the shoes are better for walking When I get chance to go for long rides on the weekend I switch to spd-sl
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Old 10-08-19, 11:45 AM
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I have a set of these pedals on my Cannondale - SPD on one side and platform on the other. They're not the lightest (by a long shot) but they are well made and will last. They are fairly easy to find, Shimano PD-M324.

I use SPD pedals on all of my bikes. Being able to walk off the bike can't be overrated. Road pedals may be more efficient, but I'm not looking for the last 1/10 of a percent to win the Tour.

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Old 10-08-19, 11:52 AM
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I don't think you want to run a long distance in shoes that work well on a long bike ride. Or vice a versa. A race bike for racing needs clipless. I imagine that a hot spot from riding in running shoes might go away during the run, it would not be fun.

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Old 10-08-19, 12:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Classtime View Post
I don't think you want to run a long distance in shoes that work well on a long bike ride. Or vice a versa.
I did a tour with Shimano SPD shoes supplemented only by sandals. The SPDs were immensely comfortable and if I could run (old foot injuries that make shoe choice problematic) they'd have been up to it.
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Old 10-08-19, 12:07 PM
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I legitimately didn't know this until I unintentionally acquired a bike with the platforms already installed, but you can convert SPD pedals over to platform for under $15 using off-brand or Shimano-made platforms to click on. Maybe the other side is still usable? I'd need to look more closely.




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Old 10-08-19, 09:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Classtime View Post
I don't think you want to run a long distance in shoes that work well on a long bike ride. Or vice a versa. A race bike for racing needs clipless. I imagine that a hot spot from riding in running shoes might go away during the run, it would not be fun.
I'm talking of bike-run brick training. 10-15 mile ride, then a 5-7 mile run. Stopping to change shoes is just a hassle in intervals like that. But I know I'm going to be doing 5mi bike/2mi run back to back at least 3x at a shot.

The most annoying part about riding in running shoes, since I don't have clipless currently, is that I put my right foot too close to the crank and my shoe squeaks every rotation. I've started wearing headphones to mitigate this.

I also have nightmares of forgetting shoes, or having one of the cleats break. Not that the second is completely founded, but it's a fear.
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Old 10-08-19, 10:37 PM
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The hybrid SPD pedals with a flat on one side are mostly intended multi purpose bikes. I have a set of the similar A530 pedals on my Rivendell Clem. I use the SPD side for long rides, but the platform side is handy if I just want to ride around the neighborhood or to the store or something.

For racing, hybrid SPD platform wouldn't be my first choice. Consider a lighter pedal like the A600, or a regular double sided XTR or something. My current road choice is the Xpedo force 3, which I prefer to most Shimano pedals that I've used.

SPD is fine for road if you like it. Racing would be fine too, though you might lose a couple cool points with the poseurs. Realistically all the power transfer arguments are BS. It's forgotten now, but Shimano originally marketed SPD as a pedal system for both road and MTB. They were trying to avoid paying patent royalties to Look. I started using SPD around the time it came out, and never quite unlearned that it was OK to use them on road bikes. Most of my rides are at least slightly mixed surface anyway, so it works for me.

If you want to wear running shoes on a bike, IME the best thing is a Lyotard 23 or one of the modern copies, and toe clips and straps. I used this combo for budget cyclocross back in the 80s. Worked pretty well. I know that there's lots of chatter on the webs about platforms being just as effective, but you aren't going to be competitive with real racers without full retention.

Here's the MKS version:

https://www.renehersecycles.com/shop...atform-pedals/

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Old 10-09-19, 01:59 AM
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I have those on my race bike.
It gives me the option to keep wearing my running shoes (during a wet 1/8 triathlon) or switch to my cheapish bike shoes.
The latter are actually mtb shoes, but not those heavy ones. Makes it far easier to run in the transitionzone. I am not that experienced that I could clip the shoes on the bike (with rubber bands, etc.) run barefoot and the jump on the bike AND slip on the shoes.

Good pedals I think to get used to SPD.
Also, you can start your bikerun unclipped and clip in when you're a tad more comfortable, regained your breath.
I dont think they are hard to clip in. But I cant compare, these are the only SPDs I have .

As for timesavers: elastic bands/laces on your running shoes are the bomb. And if it's a sprint triathlon, dont wear socks.

Hope it helps!
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Old 10-09-19, 04:59 AM
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@TriBiker19, where in NH do you split your time with MA? I'm in the Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee area. My not so nearest LBS that I prefer is Goodales in Hooksett (about 45 miles away). There are closer ones in Concord and Lebanon, but they are not my first choices.

Don't worry about breaking a SPD clip. They are steel and last and last and last.

The challenge with bike shoes (I don't think anyone has mentioned this yet), even the more casual ones for walking off the bike, is the stiffness of the soul. They are significantly different in this area when compared to a running shoe. If you come up I-93 from MA, consider stopping at Goodales (exit 9 just north of Manchester). They have a great selection of shoes.
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Old 10-09-19, 06:55 AM
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^ I submit that “stiffness of the soul” is a phrase that could be mined for a sermon. 🙄
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Old 10-09-19, 07:08 AM
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^^^^^ A typo made only more meaningful coming from Pastor Bob......
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Old 10-09-19, 07:28 AM
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Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh View Post
@TriBiker19, where in NH do you split your time with MA? I'm in the Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee area. My not so nearest LBS that I prefer is Goodales in Hooksett (about 45 miles away). There are closer ones in Concord and Lebanon, but they are not my first choices.
I'm near Jaffrey. Keene is ~35 min away and Nashua is about an hour. Mass is about 7 miles down the road. The not-so-LBS I went to was Goodales in Nashua and I'll be going there since Norm's in Keene has switched over to ski for the season and put away all their bike stuff and Andy's wasn't particularly helpful. I saw the pedals and the guy helping me was explaining them and I thought it might be a good option for my Centurion.
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Old 10-09-19, 12:03 PM
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I thought of sending these off to @TriBiker19 after rebuilding the gritty one but I'm not sure they are rebuildable. The spindle is not slotted and there is no washer. I cannot now adjust the bearings and keep things tight.
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Old 10-09-19, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by TriBiker19 View Post
I'm talking of bike-run brick training. 10-15 mile ride, then a 5-7 mile run. Stopping to change shoes is just a hassle in intervals like that. But I know I'm going to be doing 5mi bike/2mi run back to back at least 3x at a shot.

The most annoying part about riding in running shoes, since I don't have clipless currently, is that I put my right foot too close to the crank and my shoe squeaks every rotation. I've started wearing headphones to mitigate this.

I also have nightmares of forgetting shoes, or having one of the cleats break. Not that the second is completely founded, but it's a fear.
efficient bike shoes and efficient running shoes are 2 different things. In a triathalon you would transition from bike shoes to running shoes....you might consider the transitions doing a brick as training for a race transition.

if you want to do the biking in your running shoes..... I would suggest that spd pedals with the adapters posted about would be you best bet.....I like spd sl better for road, but spd is good and if I had to use only one it it would be spd

just make sure you get enough traiing in the clips so that it is not new for a race.

Sounds like this is serious training so get clipless.....
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Old 10-09-19, 01:59 PM
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Fan of dual sided SPD, I also have the 'hybrid' single sided type on our tandem.

Also have a set of the original Shimano SPD nylon flat adapter but its kind of difficult in detaching and they look junky Wal-Mart Huffy like. To have them on upper end bikes is stink. So, I've spotted these ally made large flat adapters (under $25 shipped, less the mount).

Have to admit on my modern MTB using dual sided SPD, there's times in sketchy terrain I prefer having no foot retention. Its weird reverting to riding style (sans clipped in) but the same realization came with using adjustable dropper seat post. Amazing advantages but not for C&V discussion.

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Old 10-09-19, 03:30 PM
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Those ^^^^^ do look much cooler than the black plastic jobs. I've also found that, due to the shape, the plastic ones don't fit some aftermarket SPD pedals.
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