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Tubeless conversion

Old 12-11-18, 08:57 PM
  #1  
bonsai171
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Tubeless conversion

Hi,

I have a Specialized Hardrock sport that is a rigid frame, and was considering converting to tubeless to run lower tire pressure and get better shock absorption on bumps. The current rims are not tubeless ready, so I would have to put in the gorilla tape (seen some videos on this in youtube) to seal the rim, and get tubeless schrader valves. Would it be worth doing the conversion? Will I notice a difference in shock absorption? Currently running about 25-27psi with tubes. Thanks,

Dave
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Old 12-12-18, 09:53 AM
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I did a tubeless conversion on my non tubeless ready rims. They were a bit difficult to get setup but I got there. You will not notice much difference, I have a hard tail, I didn't notice much in the way of absorption. The benefits for me were puncture resistance. One of the trails I ride has barbed vines and stickers. Both have left me stranded. You can run lower pressures which gives you more traction. 25 to 27 is too low with tubes. Do make sure you get the bead seated right if there is any part where the wheel isn't seated it will leak. my rear tire leaks and needs to be re-seated. You have to be careful how low you run your pressure in tubeless because you run the risk of burping your air out on drops and bumps.
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Old 12-12-18, 01:05 PM
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IMO, if you're not running a pretty fat tire (2.4"), the tubeless ride improvement won't be as profound. With additional tire width comes a taller sidewall, and it's this sidewall that compresses when you encounter obstacles. A tubeless 2.0" tire is going to need more pressure to protect your rims, mitigating much of the advantages. Also, non-tubeless-ready rims may be more difficult to securely seat the tire bead, resulting in the "burps" that carlosponti mentioned above. So find out how wide a tire you can run on your frame, and if you've got the clearance, buy some wide, tubeless-ready tires. I've done it and it worked, but there are no guarantees. Hope this helps!
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Old 12-12-18, 01:25 PM
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Originally Posted by bonsai171 View Post
Hi,

I have a Specialized Hardrock sport that is a rigid frame, and was considering converting to tubeless to run lower tire pressure and get better shock absorption on bumps. The current rims are not tubeless ready, so I would have to put in the gorilla tape (seen some videos on this in youtube) to seal the rim, and get tubeless schrader valves. Would it be worth doing the conversion? Will I notice a difference in shock absorption? Currently running about 25-27psi with tubes. Thanks,

Dave
If you are already running low PSI you won't see a massive difference. The benefit would be puncture and sidewall protection, and weight. You could in theory, if you don't care about weight, us the tube to seal the sealant. Its ghetto but works to protect the tire.

However if your primary goal is comfort, I am not sure its worth it. You didn't mention tire size so I am making some assumptions of course.
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Old 12-12-18, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelstrom View Post
If you are already running low PSI you won't see a massive difference. The benefit would be puncture and sidewall protection, and weight. You could in theory, if you don't care about weight, us the tube to seal the sealant. Its ghetto but works to protect the tire.

However if your primary goal is comfort, I am not sure its worth it. You didn't mention tire size so I am making some assumptions of course.
My current tires are 26X2.0. There isn't any room for tire clearance beyond a 2.0, except maybe a 2.1 or 2.2 if i'm lucky. Sounds like it isn't worth the trouble for tubeless on this bike. There have been some major component/design changes since this bike came out:
1) Suspension
2) Tubeless
3) 27.5 / 29er wheels
4) 1x drivetrains
5) Dropper posts
6) Disc brakes

Probably makes more sense to get a new bike.

Dave
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Old 12-13-18, 11:06 AM
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Originally Posted by bonsai171 View Post
My current tires are 26X2.0. There isn't any room for tire clearance beyond a 2.0, except maybe a 2.1 or 2.2 if i'm lucky. Sounds like it isn't worth the trouble for tubeless on this bike. There have been some major component/design changes since this bike came out:
1) Suspension
2) Tubeless
3) 27.5 / 29er wheels
4) 1x drivetrains
5) Dropper posts
6) Disc brakes

Probably makes more sense to get a new bike.

Dave
Sounds like it. Would be fun to get a new ride more capable on the trails and convert the old timer to a ss or something. Heck depending on how old the geo is could make for a good road bike.
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Old 12-13-18, 08:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelstrom View Post
Sounds like it. Would be fun to get a new ride more capable on the trails and convert the old timer to a ss or something. Heck depending on how old the geo is could make for a good road bike.
I have 4 bikes now, my wife would thank you for that idea ha The geometry is relaxed; right now I use it mostly for gravel rides as we live in a pretty rural area (singletrack is too rough without suspension, which is why I started the post). The drivetrain is newish, but a SS mtb would be kind of fun (I already have 2 road bikes, 1 with Shimano 105, and 1 fixed gear). Probably pretty easy to convert to SS too, just need some spacers on the cassette.

As far as mtb, there are a lot of great places to ride, so I would really like to get back to singletrack. I grew up on mtb, A lot of people in the area ride dual suspension, is it really needed?

Dave
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Old 12-13-18, 09:10 PM
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If you are going tubeless to take advantage of the lower pressures, then yes, you will definitely see noticeable improvements. I did.

If you are not getting flats with your current pressures with tubes, there is no reason not to run them that low. But with tubeless you will be able to go lower.

Smaller tires like you have and are considering (2.0-2.2) in my experience get the most benefit of all from running tubeless, because with smaller tires it is usually pinch flats that limit how low you can go with tire pressure.
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Old 12-14-18, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by bonsai171 View Post
I have 4 bikes now, my wife would thank you for that idea ha The geometry is relaxed; right now I use it mostly for gravel rides as we live in a pretty rural area (singletrack is too rough without suspension, which is why I started the post). The drivetrain is newish, but a SS mtb would be kind of fun (I already have 2 road bikes, 1 with Shimano 105, and 1 fixed gear). Probably pretty easy to convert to SS too, just need some spacers on the cassette.

As far as mtb, there are a lot of great places to ride, so I would really like to get back to singletrack. I grew up on mtb, A lot of people in the area ride dual suspension, is it really needed?

Dave
N+1 .. always

Love the 105 ran one on my DH bike, short cage.

As for suspension (of any kind) needed, no. Anything can be "ridden" by anyone. If it is rideable that is. However suspension makes things more fun imo. I can ride longer, harder and faster on my full suspension than my ht. I rented a rigid fat bike and thought I was going to die on single track. It wasn't worth the aches and pains in this now, slightly older body. You don't list where you are from, so I can't guess the intensity of your trails.

I would recommend you go demo a couple of bikes. Don't be scared of some extra travel either. If in your head you are saying 80mm, try 120mm. The suspension and frame designs today make almost everything pedalable. I ride a trek fuel ex8 for trail and xc, and have a Norco range A1 for more gnarly trails. My Norco pedals 98% as well as the trek does. If I could only have one bike, it would be the Norco. I don't race so keep that in mind.

If I lived in plano texas full time, I would buy my trek and never need anything more.
If I lived in Sedona, BC, Moab, Carolinas - I would buy my Norco and likely not need anything else.

I love ss conversion kits. Makes an old heavier bike feel like a new beast.
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Old 12-15-18, 02:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Maelstrom View Post
N+1 .. always

Love the 105 ran one on my DH bike, short cage.

As for suspension (of any kind) needed, no. Anything can be "ridden" by anyone. If it is rideable that is. However suspension makes things more fun imo. I can ride longer, harder and faster on my full suspension than my ht. I rented a rigid fat bike and thought I was going to die on single track. It wasn't worth the aches and pains in this now, slightly older body. You don't list where you are from, so I can't guess the intensity of your trails.

I would recommend you go demo a couple of bikes. Don't be scared of some extra travel either. If in your head you are saying 80mm, try 120mm. The suspension and frame designs today make almost everything pedalable. I ride a trek fuel ex8 for trail and xc, and have a Norco range A1 for more gnarly trails. My Norco pedals 98% as well as the trek does. If I could only have one bike, it would be the Norco. I don't race so keep that in mind.

If I lived in plano texas full time, I would buy my trek and never need anything more.
If I lived in Sedona, BC, Moab, Carolinas - I would buy my Norco and likely not need anything else.

I love ss conversion kits. Makes an old heavier bike feel like a new beast.
Hi, we live in Northeastern Atlanta. It is pretty rural, and there are a lot of mtb trails. Been riding practically forever, though I'm starting to really feel it (almost 40!) going over the rougher trails which I tend to ride. The trails can be very rocky, tooth, and technical.

Most of the time when I ask the full sus vs front did question at bike shops they tell me front is enough (used to have a Trek 4500 front sus with Rockshox Judy that was very comfortable) they tell me front is enough, though I'm afraid it won't be. Leaning toward either full sus or a front sus plus bike, like the Trek Roscoe.

One of the local trails has demos sometimes, but is closed for hunting season now.. That might be a good way to test out some bikes when the trails open up again in January.

Dave

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Old 12-15-18, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by bonsai171 View Post
Hi, we live in Northeastern Atlanta. It is pretty rural, and there are a lot of mtb trails. Been riding practically forever, though I'm starting to really feel it (almost 40!) going over the rougher trails which I tend to ride. The trails can be very rocky, tooth, and technical.

Most of the time when I ask the full sus vs front did question at bike shops they tell me front is enough (used to have a Trek 4500 front sus with Rockshox Judy that was very comfortable) they tell me front is enough, though I'm afraid it won't be. Leaning toward either full sus or a front sus plus bike, like the Trek Roscoe.

One of the local trails has demos sometimes, but is closed for hunting season now.. That might be a good way to test out some bikes when the trails open up again in January.

Dave
I guess the other question is, how much do you want to travel. Atlanta really isn't that far from North Carolina. And if I remember my geography at the tail end of the Appalachians? Maybe head to Asheville and demo some bikes there. (I know reasonably long drive). Personally if I lived in your area I would be driving to some seriously epic spots.

Do you want to expand your riding into even more spots by air. I travel to AZ bi yearly for example. Montana once a year and go on a road trip through the rockies. If you want to be able to do that, renting is downright terrible for the most part, owning your own fully rig might make more sense.

That's my take anyways. *shrugs* enjoy whatever you demo and buy, time for me to go get dirty.
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Old 12-16-18, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by bonsai171 View Post
Hi, we live in Northeastern Atlanta. It is pretty rural, and there are a lot of mtb trails. Been riding practically forever, though I'm starting to really feel it (almost 40!) going over the rougher trails which I tend to ride. The trails can be very rocky, tooth, and technical.

Most of the time when I ask the full sus vs front did question at bike shops they tell me front is enough (used to have a Trek 4500 front sus with Rockshox Judy that was very comfortable) they tell me front is enough, though I'm afraid it won't be. Leaning toward either full sus or a front sus plus bike, like the Trek Roscoe.

One of the local trails has demos sometimes, but is closed for hunting season now.. That might be a good way to test out some bikes when the trails open up again in January.

Dave
If you haven't made a decision by March, come down to Florida, Santos FTF 8th to 10th Santos Fat Tire Festival, presented by the Ocala Mountain Bike Association - March 8-10th, 2019 Camping is limited and campground access requires membership, but access to the trails and vendors is free. Usually 8 to 10 bike manufacturers there. Last year, Giant, Santa Cruz, Pivot, Rocky Mount, Specialized, Salsa, Cannondale, and a few more I can't remember.
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