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Schwinn Tires.

Old 08-16-19, 08:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
The original and genuine "Schwinn" was in business from 1895-1992, they don't "allow" anything to happen anymore and haven't for quite some time.
Is this news?
Pretty sure that was dry sarcasm on Bad Lag's part, but to follow in that joke...it's horrible that they allowed the Schwinn Approved Huret Allvit to happen too.

Though I've heard that the Schwinn Approved Allvit inadvertently increased the popularity of skeet shooting by 500%.

-Kurt
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Old 08-16-19, 10:37 PM
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Originally Posted by madpogue View Post
That's IF you opt to swap wheels. To answer the original question, @Limper, your tires probably say 20 x 1 3/4". That's the old Schwinn juvenile 20", with an ISO 419 diameter. Here's a Sunlite brand on Amazon - https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000AO9OVW/ . Kenda makes one as well - https://www.bmxguru.com/products/ken...l-black-47-419 .
No no no… he mentioned 20 x 1 3/8" in his original post. These are the same bead seat diameter as BMX "mini" tires: 451mm BSD.

Limper, if you want tires that fit, search for the ETRTO size 37-451. There are a couple around thanks to the folding bike and recumbent bike markets. Not many, but they are out there. One well-known brand is Primo Comet: https://store.bikefriday.com/product...roducts_id=953
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Old 08-17-19, 01:37 AM
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^^^^^^ Good call, thank you for the correction! So Schwinn actually had two different 20" standards, one for their S-5 and S-6 rims (ISO 451) and one for their wider S-7 rim (ISO 419). So maybe @Bad Lag has a point.....
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Old 08-17-19, 04:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Jeff Wills View Post
No no no… he mentioned 20 x 1 3/8" in his original post. These are the same bead seat diameter as BMX "mini" tires: 451mm BSD.

Limper, if you want tires that fit, search for the ETRTO size 37-451. There are a couple around thanks to the folding bike and recumbent bike markets. Not many, but they are out there. One well-known brand is Primo Comet: https://store.bikefriday.com/product...roducts_id=953
FYI, those Primo Comets are high pressure, high-end tires. They're probably not that ideal for a burr-prone, Schwinn S6 rim.

Kenda still makes this size as these Schwinns would have originally run - a heavier and more pedestrian blackwalls - but better suited to the quality (or lack of it) of the Schwinn rims.

-Kurt
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Old 08-17-19, 11:49 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
The original and genuine "Schwinn" was in business from 1895-1992, they don't "allow" anything to happen anymore and haven't for quite some time.
Is this news?

-Bandera
Nah! I just have a pet peave with product suppliers who use non-standard, anti-competitive, proprietary designs which force you back to them. Think about the entire plumbing industry as a better example than Schwinn.

That this size was a British standard size assuages my concerns somewhat for a C&V bike.

The link between the Schwinn Approved Alvit and skeet shooting is another good example. It's well documented and widely acknowledged as true.

Last edited by Bad Lag; 08-17-19 at 11:54 AM.
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Old 08-17-19, 12:35 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Bad Lag View Post
Nah! I just have a pet peave with product suppliers who use non-standard, anti-competitive, proprietary designs which force you back to them.
It's been common with vertical integration in a bike industry isolated from International competition and with the need to assure QC/QA standards that met their requirements and of their customers that proprietary designs were adopted by Schwinn and others. When you make your own components you do it your way to assure that you get what suppliers aren't up to providing and/or to control costs. Raleigh was no different w/ their "proprietary" standards in Nottingham production that satisfied the "All Steel Bicycle" requirements of durability just as Schwinn did here by manufacturing components and setting strict QC/QA for "Schwinn Approved" components. With the many millions of Chicago built bikes that are nearly immortal due to OEM design, Mfg and sourcing standards for outstanding reliability and durability out there Kenda or whoever will make rubber to fit their spec as long as there are customers to buy them. Likely for decades more of service.

The French failed to make metric a universal standard back-when, the Italian BB was local and now we have BB 30 and a host of other like non-standard specs, not much has or will change in the last century or so for "non-standard" designs to proliferate. So it goes.

PS: The Huret Allvit aka Schwinn Approved was not so despised by all "back when":

"In the late 50s and early 60s, it was used by racers and cyclotourists alike, and was installed on some very nice bicycles, including those from such respected names as René Herse."

http://bikeretrogrouch.blogspot.com/...et-allvit.html



-Bandera
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Old 08-17-19, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
....Raleigh was no different w/ their "proprietary" standards in Nottingham production that satisfied the "All Steel Bicycle" requirements of durability just as Schwinn did here by manufacturing components and setting strict QC/QA for "Schwinn Approved" components. With the many millions of Chicago built bikes that are nearly immortal due to OEM design, Mfg and sourcing standards for outstanding reliability and durability out there Kenda or whoever will make rubber to fit their spec as long as there are customers to buy them. Likely for decades more of service.
While I'm not as much a curmudgeon about unusual bolt head sizes or thread pitches as Bad Lag - I do get irked when the non-standard parts have a bad reputation.

It's one of the reasons I started to swear off most high-end French stuff. Want a French FD to go with it? Expect lousy shifting or crack-prone clamps. Stem? 22.0, and some of the nice ones are as death-prone as the AVAs.

For me, Schwinn steel rims fall into this category. While some would argue that these rims were durable because kids could jump 'em off curbs, I don't agree. They survived only because they were slightly thicker gauge than the rest of the competition. Otherwise, the knurling that every last redneck Schwinn fan seems to rave over is really just an underchromed area that attracts rust, and the braking surface - particularly on the 27" rims - are often wavier than a Ruffles potato chip.

Those who say that Schwinn Approved rims are "good" have never seen an early 1950's Raleigh steel Westrick rim.

I also don't buy into the whole "Schwinn Approved" meant extensive quality and testing thing. Those 5-speed Atom freewheels that they used in the '60s and '70s are garbage. They're extremely prone to chain skate, even with the widest of chains, while I've never seen the same trend from other freewheels of the same era.

Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
"In the late 50s and early 60s, it was used by racers and cyclotourists alike, and was installed on some very nice bicycles, including those from such respected names as René Herse."

The Retrogrouch: Huret Allvit
Still doesn't make 'em good. The heavy springs in the Allvit make them difficult to operate and vague (yes, even on a wide 5 speed freewheel), plus that spring tends to fight the shifter lever tension.

Admittedly, I've never tried putting Shimano jockey wheels on one, which would accommodate a bit more side-to-side play than the bearing wheels. Might improve the vagueness.

-Kurt
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Old 08-17-19, 04:59 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by cudak888 View Post
I also don't buy into the whole "Schwinn Approved" meant extensive quality and testing thing.
You are woefully uninformed for a purported "Vintage Bicycle Rescourse".

"Yoshiro Shimano visited Stan Natanek, the head of Schwinn, several times before receiving any order for parts from him. Natanek was called "the Destroyer" within the industry and was known as an expert in finding defects in components. He repeatedly destroyed every component brought to him by Shimano before giving his first stamp of approval."

https://books.google.com/books?id=DJ...atanek&f=false

See "No Hands: The Rise and Fall of the Schwinn Bicycle Company" for Stan providing hands on line expertise on a QC/QA approval trip to the start-up of Giant in Taiwan to be approved to produce product for Schwinn, setting up and running the Schwinn Factory Approved mechanic training program and much else.

PS: Although Stan wasn't the "head of Schwinn" as noted in the quote above he was responsible for much original design, QC/QA, product testing and development, out sourced product testing and approval certification, Factory Approved Mechanic program, The Schwinn Reporter mechanic training content and being a straight-up no BS good man. Yep, it was my privilege to know Stan and a bit of what he did for us dealers in the field, in Chicago and in the world wide bicycle industry.

-Bandera
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Last edited by Bandera; 08-17-19 at 05:49 PM.
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Old 08-17-19, 05:35 PM
  #34  
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Ah, Schwinn bashing - the old pastime.

Lots of people rode lots of Schwinns of all types many, many miles. They work fine. They may not be one's cup of tea, and we all have preferences, but they work. Heavy? Oh yes! Low quality? You know not the meaning of quality.

Free of defect in high percentages. From the first welded seam on the first piece of tubing, to the paint and decals - Schwinn quality was excellent! So many still exist intact because of this. They can usually be returned to a functional state with minimal effort. Quality is not lighter, or faster, or high performance. It is consistently achieving high manufacturing standards. Schwinn did this to a degree that few other large-scale manufacturers did.

Doesn't mean one has to like them. But, at the very least, respect the product for what it was. If they didn't work for you, that's fine. But that's anecdotal. I've owned a few - still own one. I like 'em. Anecdotal.

And...







...not all Schwinn fans are "rednecks."
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Old 08-17-19, 06:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
You are woefully misinformed.

"Yoshiro Shimano visited Stan Natanek, the head of Schwinn, several times before receiving any order for parts from him. Natanek was called "the Destroyer" within the industry and was known as an expert in finding defects in components. He repeatedly destroyed every component brought to him by Shimano before giving his first stamp of approval."

https://books.google.com/books?id=DJ...atanek&f=false

See "No Hands: The Rise and Fall of the Schwinn Bicycle Company" for Stan providing hands on line expertise on a QC/QA approval trip to the start-up of Giant in Taiwan to be approved to produce product for Schwinn, setting up and running the Schwinn Factory Approved mechanic training program and much else.

PS: Stan wasn't the "head of Schwinn". He was responsible for much original design, QC/QA, product testing and development, out sourced product testing and approval certification, Factory Approved Mechanic program, The Schwinn Reporter mechanic training content and being a straight-up no BS good man. Yep, it was my privilege to know Stan and a bit of what he did for us dealers in the field, in Chicago and in the world wide bicycle industry.

-Bandera
I can appreciate Stan's role in this and I can also appreciate the simple wisdom of testing everyday bicycle parts to destruction (rather than the AutoCAD testing they'd probably rely on today), but the choice for the Allvit, so I've read, seems to have been primarily a decision of Frank Schwinn's - in an effort to get away from Simplex at a near-enough price point.

I'm sure it was tested to destruction, as you say, and passed Stan's approval in that respect. Given his involvement in the mechanic program, I have no doubt that he also analysed it for functionality (the other very important metric towards a good part), but I dare say the ultimate decision was a business one, and the Allvit was a case of good enough for the time, cost per unit, and necessary so that the company could continue manufacturing bicycles.

My point is, despite all of the efforts of Mr. Natanek and his high standards, it doesn't excuse the Allvit, and - yes - even companies with such people behind them could make a decision that defies their business motto. Time has proven that any SunTour V (or if you want to go earlier, the Competition) would have been a better choice integrating both durability and functionality.

Incidentally, the first time I ran into the Shimano-made GT100, I thought it was an Allvit - and was shocked that Huret had finally stepped up their game and taught the beast to shift. Then I found out it was made by Shimano, and all my questions were answered

-Kurt
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Old 08-17-19, 06:04 PM
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Originally Posted by cudak888 View Post
While I'm not as much a curmudgeon about unusual bolt head sizes or thread pitches as Bad Lag - I do get irked when the non-standard parts have a bad reputation.
It is astoundingly provincial to be "a curmudgeon about unusual bolt head sizes or thread pitches" back-when or now in the C&V environment.
Was Whitworth unusual to a British bike mechanic in the '50's, Metric to a French one in the '70's or American in a Schwinn shop in the '60's?
All were SOP in their manufacturing environment and any mechanic worth the name knew what was what and had the tool set to work on an old Humber, Gitane or Varsity that came in the shop.

PS: Regarding "Rednecks" in the C&V space.
Is there any other sub-culture in our society that you would care to disparage from the intellectual and cultural bastion of Southern Florida?

-Bandera
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Old 08-17-19, 06:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
It is astoundingly provincial to be "a curmudgeon about unusual bolt head sizes or thread pitches" back-when or now in the C&V environment.
Was Whitworth unusual to a British bike mechanic in the '50's, Metric to a French one in the '70's or American in a Schwinn shop in the '60's?
All were SOP in their manufacturing environment and any mechanic worth the name knew what was what and had the tool set to work on an old Humber, Gitane or Varsity that came in the shop.
Did you read the rest of my sentence that you cut out in your quote? I purposefully clarified that I don't feel the same way as Bad Lag about this. It is only when odd standards frequently go hand-in-hand with bad quality that I get frustrated.

I think the five non-road Raleighs sitting in my fleet tend to drive home that point

Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
PS: Regarding "Rednecks" in the C&V space.
Is there any other sub-culture in our society that you would care to disparage from the intellectual and cultural bastion of Southern Florida?
Now you know why I cited what I cited. Tons of old Schwinns and old Raleighs are down here; guess which ones get unwarranted attention and put on a plinth like a Confente, and which ones get tossed unworthingly on the scrapheap?

Fact is, one of these brands frequently gets the short end of the stick due to a nostalgia cake with a fair amount of ignorance for frosting.

I don't doubt this is a stereotype of a single region, but the pattern seems to show up whenever I make the mistake of wandering into a bunch of balloon tire enthusiasts online.

-Kurt
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Old 08-17-19, 06:36 PM
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Originally Posted by cudak888 View Post
the Allvit was a case of good enough for the time
It was.
Rene' Herse used them on bespoke handmade Constructor machines, they passed Stan Natanek's intensive Schwinn Approved certification process and not one of my Varsity or Continental customers complained about their performance. Good enough was indeed good enough. Carping about it in mass production for what were machines for American teenagers of the '60's/'70's today is revisionist, elitist and down right silly.

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Old 08-17-19, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
It was.
Rene' Herse used them on bespoke handmade Constructor machines, they passed Stan Natanek's intensive Schwinn Approved certification process and not one of my Varsity or Continental customers complained about their performance. Good enough was indeed good enough. Carping about it in mass production for what were machines for American teenagers of the '60's/'70's is revisionist, elitist and down right silly.
Fair enough. In the grand scheme of things, it's trivial anyway.

-Kurt
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Old 08-17-19, 08:39 PM
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Wow. Did this thread drift or what?

Anyone want to see a picture of my cat?
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Old 08-18-19, 12:57 AM
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I did not intend to take us so far afield. I do remember paying about $20 for a single stainless steel bolt to fit the seat lug on my bike. It was some odd-ball English threading that cost me. I should have just re-tapped for a more common thread pattern but could not bring myself to do it.

Here's a good thing Schwinn did related to tires.

Somewhere around 1970, Schwinn started selling an excellent, high pressure 27X1 1/4" tire. Now, high pressure back then meant only 90 psi but relative to the 60 psi I'd been limited to, that was something. It had a central tread that was "slick" (smooth) and it had file or rib pattern tread on either side. The tread was thick enough to never worry about tire life and it helped reduce punctures to very few. The tire fit all the standard rims of the day and actually allowed 90 psi inside.

I loved those tires.

They were soon eclipsed by a raft of top quality, very light weight, foldable clinchers that afforded even higher pressures, not the least of which were those sold by Specialized. That decade, 1970 to 1980 saw huge changes in clincher-type wheels and tires. It also saw the decline of tubular tires, as the clinchers were just THAT good.


ETA - Tire may have been called the "LeTour", similar to their bicycle.

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Old 08-18-19, 01:13 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by BFisher View Post
Lots of people rode lots of Schwinns of all types many, many miles. They work fine. They may not be one's cup of tea, and we all have preferences, but they work. Heavy? Oh yes! Low quality? You know not the meaning of quality.

Free of defect in high percentages. From the first welded seam on the first piece of tubing, to the paint and decals - Schwinn quality was excellent! So many still exist intact because of this. They can usually be returned to a functional state with minimal effort. Quality is not lighter, or faster, or high performance. It is consistently achieving high manufacturing standards. Schwinn did this to a degree that few other large-scale manufacturers did.

Doesn't mean one has to like them. But, at the very least, respect the product for what it was. If they didn't work for you, that's fine. But that's anecdotal. I've owned a few - still own one. I like 'em. Anecdotal.
They were and remain excellent bicycles. There can be no doubt about that. They had high initial quality and retained that quality over time (they were reliable).
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Old 08-20-19, 02:46 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Vintage Schwinn View Post
GOOGLE: kenda k23


KENDA is the Only manufacturer that I know of for these SCHWINN Only 26 x 1 3/8 (37mm - 597mm) Tires.

You can find them in BLACKWALL, GUMWALL, and WHITEWALL versions.

There are MILLIONS of Schwinn bicycles that are still on the road that take these tires.
THERE IS NO SHORTAGE OF THEM! THERE IS NO WORRY OF KENDA DISCONTINUING THEM.
Expect to pay approximately $20 each with FREE SHIPPING..............or slightly less than that.
Search EBAY: kenda 26 x 1 3/8 (37-597) schwinn tire
You will find at least eight different major online bicycle shops/parts suppliers that have an EBAY store listing. These will be brand NEW!!!
Do not even consider buying a USED tire under any circumstances.....waste of money because you'd pay significant shipping costs and even if you bought the used tire for $0.02 it is a bad deal because shipping likely will exceed $10.............. JUST SAY NO TO EVER BUYING "USED" TIRES!!!

Make CERTAIN that the 26 x 1 3/8 tires that you ultimately select have (37-597) stamped on the sidewall, along with 26 x 1 3/8
THE REASON is that "COMMON" (non-Schwinn) 26 x 1 3/8 tires have 37-590 on them............590mm being rim size designation and 37mm being tread width..
SCHWINN S5 and S6 twenty-six inch wheels TAKE This SCHWINN Only 597mm tire for the SCHWINN's S5 and S6 597mm rim size.
The industry "common" 26 x 1 3/8 is 590mm and THIS SIZE TIRE WILL NOT FIT ON THE Schwinn S5 and S6 rim.
The SCHWINN S5 and S6 rims are the exact same size.
The only difference between them is cosmetic, as the S5 has a slight raised hump in the center in the middle where the spokes are...............the S6 has a smooth portion there. The last year model that the S5 was seen on a Schwinn Collegiate was the 1972 model. The 1973 model Collegiate has the S6.
The S5 goes back to the 1950's. Both are chromed steel wheels with the same spokes, etc......None are better than the other......purely cosmetic as the 1973 and later(S6) has a smooth appearance, and the 1950's-1972 (S5) has the slight raised hump..............You'll know the difference when you see them.

OKAY, make certain the TIRE is 597mm.
597 = Schwinn ONLY
590 = Everybody Else

The kenda k23 = 26 x 1 3/8 (37-597)

I mention all of this specifically because Kenda and other tire makers make the "Everybody Else" industry standard 26 x 1 3/8 590mm for Columbia Tourist V bikes, Raleigh Sprites equipped with 26 wheels, Murray, AMF, Huffy, Sears Ted Williams, Free Spirit....any other make with 26 x 1 3/8 has the 590mm.
SCHWINN must have 597mm

THE INNER TUBE does not matter, just anything labeled 26 x 1 3/8

You'll find that your Local Bike Shop probably does carry BONTRAGER 26 x 1 3/8 inner tubes with a SCHRADER valve. They should be inexpensive, no more than $9 or $10 maximum from your local bike shop, and add another $6 Labor charge to install each one, and of course sales tax on the cost of just the tubes.
THESE BONTRAGER TUBES ARE VERY THIN AND LIGHTWEIGHT.
I recommend other brand tubes if you want Thorn Resistant TUBES.
I like XLC Thorn Resistant 26 x 1 3/8 over the BONTRAGER tubes...............but tubes are tubes and they all work fine.....but if you ride where there may be thorns, you should consider thorn resistant tubes from any manufacturer.
Tire Liners do work if you use elcheapo BONTRAGER tubes but TIRE LINERS cost more than decent tubes and if not fitted properly can cause problems over time.
I don't recommend PRESTA valve tubes unless you really like them or have them on all of your other bikes.
I do have PRESTA valve tubes on one of my Collegiates (a 1972 with the S-5 wheels..). They have a little stainless steel, or is it billet aluminum, adapter that allows the PRESTA valve stem to function properly in a wheel valve hole designed for a SCHRADER valve stem. It is essentially nothing but a washer like thing that fits perfect and perfectly resizes the hole................I have been using it that way for about four years or more, as it was that way with PRESTA tubes when a pal of mine had the bike.
On my other COLLEGIATES with the "stock" SCHRADER inner tubes.........I am running with THORN RESISTANT XLC 26 x 1 3/8 inner tubes THAT I SOURCED from random bike parts (crosslake sales) out of crosslake mn on the bay...................I bought a large number of tubes from them in 2018 for my Collegiates and for my neighbor's Collegiates...................We installed new k23 KENDA tires, sourced from a couple of other web bike stores with a presence on the bay.........One of my neighbor's wanted Whitewall version, and we also got both GUMWALL and BLACKWALL versions for various COLLEGIATES.
It is my opinion based on years of using these tires and thousand plus miles, my experience is that the BLACKWALL version lasts significantly longer than the GUMWALL or WHITEWALL as you'll get sidewall deterioration sooner, but have no worries, it will take years and you will get more than your money's worth on these tires. *****THESE TIRES are Hard To GET PROPERLY Seated, IF YOU ARE NOT EXPERIENCED in INSTALLING BICYCLE TIRES, take them to your local bike shop and pay them to install them......because you want them to roll smoothly.
I will say this for the elcheapo BONTRAGER tubes, they are tubes that will do the job okay....................I have them in at least one of my Schwinns..............if you do choose to use these el-cheapo thin tubes or another brand that is el-cheapo thin like the BONTRAGERS are, make sure you avoid thorns and carry a spare tube or a fully charged cell phone to call your spouse or a buddy.........or you'll be walkin the bike home.
Good tubes are worth the cost. They don't cost much if you source them from webland. It ain't a racing bike where you need lightweight rubber that is nearly as thin as a child's balloon.
The UPC code of the XLC thorn resistant 26 x 1 3/8 tube is 4 032191777047
the SKU # 144407 The inner tube is Made in Taiwan

I would highly recommend that before you mount the NEW TIRES and NEW TUBES, Be Certain to Feel All Around The Inside Of The Schwinn Wheel WITH YOUR FINGER TIP...............if you feel any sharp/rough spots or tiny rust/corrosion areas that are not smooth.....GET SOME VERY VERY FINE SANDPAPER or Emery Cloth Sandpaper of something like 800 Grit and then sand these sharp/rough spots so they are now smooth to the FINGER TIP Test..........If there are any of these rough spots where the corrosion has removed the chrome layer......I simply dab NAIL POLISH on to the sanded bare rough spot...........IT DOESN'T MATTER WHAT COLOR NAIL POLISH THAT YOU USE BECAUSE IT WON'T BE SEEN as it is on the underside of the rim.............you can use oil based paint....or just spray paint a small puddle on to an aluminum pie plate and then use a tiny "artist"or kids paint brush to then transfer the wet paint from the pie plate to the inner wheel's rough spots.............you can even put a thin layer of EPOXY as a final coating after the nailpolish/paint has dried.......Let the thin layer of EPOXY dry for at least 24 hours before proceeding..................Use the $1.89 Harbour Freight EPOXY in tubes...part A , part B.............squirt out equal small blobs on a paper plate or something and then mix them with a Golf Tee or something...tiny twig stick. etc..............Apply over the nail polished/painted area.....making certain to lay a thin smooth coating................you've gotta work relatively fast with the EPOXY because it is the 4 min fast type, but it still takes 24 hours to fully cure....... If you have plenty of rough areas to deal with...............just continue to squirt out equal parts of A and B and mix and repeat this for each area..........because your EPOXY will begin setting quickly........ IF YOU DO THAT and you check the spokes with a spoke wrench if you dare, and your ancient Schwinn S5 / S6 wheels will probably be good for another 40 years or more if they don't exhibit any rust or chrome loss on the exterior of the wheel.
***When I said....Spoke Wrench....if you dare............I mean because meaning well novices can really $%@& up the wheel shape by getting carried away without having a clue..................everybody does eventually see what is happing and how they $%@& -ed it up because they begin to notice how the shape has moved one way or the other too much, or warped and wavy................unless you want to spend hours getting it back...................don't do it or read up and/or see YOUTUBE because IF THE WHEEL LOOKS AND SPINS FAIRLY TRUE, you can really $%@& it up thinking you're tightening the spokes of the wheel UNLESS YOU KNOW WHAT YOU'RE DOING..............................It is easy to LEARN, but you don't want to learn the hard way....

I highly recommend that for all your maintenance on your vintage Schwinn or any ancient bicycle from the early eighties or earlier that you obtain an approximately $4 and free shipping copy of the (c) 1973 book , 8 1/2 x 11 Softbound , Approx 338 pages called "GLENN'S COMPLETE BICYCLE MANUAL" that probably sold over a half million copies during the Seventies. Those huge Used booksellers on the bay all have multiple copies in their inventory, most likely ex-library books.... You will likely never need to pay more than $7 or $8 with free shipping.......there are so many copies floating around. It is the best bicycle repair-maintenance manual ever written for all bicycles made between 1947 and 1980. YOUTUBE is also helpful. This forum and the c.a.b.e. are excellent. There is also GOOGLE too.

I know that is perhaps a tiny bit more than you wanted to know concerning the essential 597mm Schwinn 26 x 1 3/8 tires.
Stay thin, Ride a Schwinn!!
Keep them rolling on the roads.
Thank you, thank you, thank you for this amazing and comprehensive explanation! For the life of me I couldn't figure out why I couldn't fit the new 37-590 tires on my S6 wheels! Yes, I fell victim to just picking up a set of generic Kendas (37-590) to replace the crusty old tires on my 76 Racer where I couldn't even make out the tire size due to being so old and degraded.

Now, I need to replace the 27x1 1/4 tires on my Suburban and don't want to go down that same path! Further down this thread "Bad Lag" mentioned that all the 27x1 1/4 tires that Schwinn used would fit all the standard rims of the day....:
"Somewhere around 1970, Schwinn started selling an excellent, high pressure 27X1 1/4" tire. Now, high pressure back then meant only 90 psi but relative to the 60 psi I'd been limited to, that was something. It had a central tread that was "slick" (smooth) and it had file or rib pattern tread on either side. The tread was thick enough to never worry about tire life and it helped reduce punctures to very few. The tire fit all the standard rims of the day and actually allowed 90 psi inside."

So if I go and buy some "standard" 27x1 1/4 tires, will they fit the S-6 Schwinn Tubular Rim or K-2 Rim???

This is what the old tires say on the gumwalls:
27 x 1 1/4 to Fit S-6 Schwinn Tubular Rim or K-2 Rim

What's a "K-2" rim?

Thanks for this valuable info!
Daniel
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Old 08-20-19, 03:10 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by cudak888 View Post
Pretty sure that was dry sarcasm on Bad Lag's part, but to follow in that joke...it's horrible that they allowed the Schwinn Approved Huret Allvit to happen too.

Though I've heard that the Schwinn Approved Allvit inadvertently increased the popularity of skeet shooting by 500%.

-Kurt
I must admit I have a strange and irrational affection for the Allvit. Not sure why. Rooting for the underdog I guess.
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Old 08-20-19, 03:23 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by dedominguez View Post
Now, I need to replace the 27x1 1/4 tires on my Suburban and don't want to go down that same path!
The Schwinn 27 x 1-1/4" tires/rims were and are the same as the competition's. Just don't pump them up past 75PSI on the factory steel wheels. Also advisable not to get folding Kevlar beads when working with these older rims.

-Kurt
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Old 08-20-19, 05:03 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by Bad Lag View Post
Here's a good thing Schwinn did related to tires.

Somewhere around 1970, Schwinn started selling an excellent, high pressure 27X1 1/4" tire. Now, high pressure back then meant only 90 psi but relative to the 60 psi I'd been limited to, that was something. It had a central tread that was "slick" (smooth) and it had file or rib pattern tread on either side. The tread was thick enough to never worry about tire life and it helped reduce punctures to very few. The tire fit all the standard rims of the day and actually allowed 90 psi inside.

I loved those tires.
And a few decades before that, Schwinn was also responsible for steering the US bicycle market away from single-tube tires and toward the wired-on "clinchers" we enjoy today.
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Old 08-21-19, 09:30 AM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by Vintage Schwinn View Post
The SCHWINN S5 and S6 rims are the exact same size.
The only difference between them is cosmetic, as the S5 has a slight raised hump in the center in the middle where the spokes are...............the S6 has a smooth portion there. The last year model that the S5 was seen on a Schwinn Collegiate was the 1972 model. The 1973 model Collegiate has the S6.
Interesting little tidbit there as I am an original owner of a Sept 1972 built Collegiate Sport (Sierra Brown). I just ran downstairs to check and indeed it has the S5 wheels. What build-date did the model-year typically change? I was thinking it might be like the automotive industry where the model year build-date change typically occurs in the August time-frame, and thus my bike would then be a 1973 model year. But that doesn't seem to be the case here.
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Old 08-21-19, 09:56 AM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by DPDISXR4Ti View Post
What build-date did the model-year typically change? I was thinking it might be like the automotive industry where the model year build-date change typically occurs in the August time-frame, and thus my bike would then be a 1973 model year. But that doesn't seem to be the case here.
That is a big misconception among many Schwinn collectors, it was nothing like the auto industry. Back then Schwinn did not start building a given model year bike until well after the start of the year, after a long factory shutdown for inventory and tooling changes. For example in '72 the factory shut down at the end of the business day on on Friday Dec. 29th and then re-opened on Monday Jan. 15th 1973. In other words the first 1973 model Schwinn bikes were built on Jan. 15th '73.

Note however that *parts* for bikes were often procured well in advance of the bike builds, and that included headtubes pre-stamped with serial numbers. Thus many of the first '73 models could indeed have headtubes that were stamped in late '72, well before they were even welded to frames.
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Old 08-21-19, 11:37 AM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by dedominguez View Post
Thank you, thank you, thank you for this amazing and comprehensive explanation! For the life of me I couldn't figure out why I couldn't fit the new 37-590 tires on my S6 wheels! Yes, I fell victim to just picking up a set of generic Kendas (37-590) to replace the crusty old tires on my 76 Racer where I couldn't even make out the tire size due to being so old and degraded.

Now, I need to replace the 27x1 1/4 tires on my Suburban and don't want to go down that same path! Further down this thread "Bad Lag" mentioned that all the 27x1 1/4 tires that Schwinn used would fit all the standard rims of the day....:
"Somewhere around 1970, Schwinn started selling an excellent, high pressure 27X1 1/4" tire. Now, high pressure back then meant only 90 psi but relative to the 60 psi I'd been limited to, that was something. It had a central tread that was "slick" (smooth) and it had file or rib pattern tread on either side. The tread was thick enough to never worry about tire life and it helped reduce punctures to very few. The tire fit all the standard rims of the day and actually allowed 90 psi inside."

So if I go and buy some "standard" 27x1 1/4 tires, will they fit the S-6 Schwinn Tubular Rim or K-2 Rim???

This is what the old tires say on the gumwalls:
27 x 1 1/4 to Fit S-6 Schwinn Tubular Rim or K-2 Rim

What's a "K-2" rim?

Thanks for this valuable info!
Daniel
The Schwinn steel 27" rims were also used on their tandems, so were made to fiercely retain the tire beads at the highest pressures that might be used. 100psi is nothing on these rims if the wire-bead tire is rated for it.
This is part of why it is often difficult to get tire beads fully seated on Schwinn rims such that the tire has no "low spots" as the wheel turns.
It can take several attempts at inflation, deflation and re-inflation before the beads pop up to the same level all the way around the rim.
It helps to use a little suds between the tire beads and the rim, and I have had issues getting Continental-brand wire-bead tires to seat on Schwinn rims under any less-than-perfect conditions (such as inflating the tire in the field using a hand pump).

It is true that the Schwinn rims could be a bit lumpy at their braking surfaces, just as the French Chrolux/Superchromix rims often featured uneven joint welds.
The French and (better-made imo) Japanese chromed rims typically weigh about 750g each (bare), while Schwinn's 27" chromed rims are more like a full 1100g each, bare! That 55% more steel equates to a huge increase in dent- and bending-resistance.

The knurling along the Schwinn rim's center weld (circumferential weld seam) was an aesthetic finishing of the unsightly weld seam, and later would become the subject of a lawsuit by Schwinn against Murray, as the knurling was presented in court by Schwinn as a trademark feature of the brand. Schwinn actually lost that case as I recall.
Chrome plating over such uneven surfaces tends to leave uneven plating thickness where surface locations become unevenly "shadowed" electrically during the plating process, so may later become sites for rusting where dirt and water may also tend to accumulate. But it's not like Schwinn's rims were any worse than other brand's chrome rims in terms of rust resistance.

The Allvit derailer works well with freewheels in the size range of 24-28t. These also work best with longer shift levers or with retrofriction levers, due to their heavy return spring.
When modified (internal clearancing for longer throw), these can even shift over a standard 6s freewheel if everything is optimally set up, but will start to show a loss of actuation linearity (longer lever throw per gear shift) as the largest (6th) cog is approached, and Schwinn levers will just barely move far enough for this.
The Allvit ("All Vittesses" or "All Speeds") was named for it's compatibility with the late-1950's freewheels having 3, 4 and five speeds, and was perhaps the best at doing what it did using common-sized freewheels. No wonder then that Schwinn replaced their derailer bike's Simplex plunger derailers with the new Allvit!
Racers and racer-wannabees would later scoff at the Allvit's prodigious weight when lighter derailers (finally!) became available with gear-handling capabilities rivaling or exceeding the Allvit's.
And Schwinn's re-design of the Allvit cage during the early 70's added yet even more weight. But Schwinn so valued the added chain control on their roughly-ridden entry-level bikes that they even had Shimano make 5s freewheels with a chain-catcher ring and with driveside weather shielding.
These freewheels greatly improved Schwinn's shifting as early as 1970, and Schwinn even went to the expense of widening their rear frame spacing to 126mm to accomodate these widened 5s freewheels so as to maintain full rear wheel strength.
Clearly then, Schwinn prioritized reliability over light weight in their rims and in their drivetrains (they also had their patented "dual plateau" chainring set to go with these features, which shifts great even today using 9s chain).

Schwinn-Approved Allvit with standard-spaced 13-30t, 6s freewheel and C9 chain:



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Old 08-21-19, 10:53 PM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by cudak888 View Post
The Schwinn 27 x 1-1/4" tires/rims were and are the same as the competition's. Just don't pump them up past 75PSI on the factory steel wheels. Also advisable not to get folding Kevlar beads when working with these older rims.

-Kurt
Thank you for the confirmation, Kurt!
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