Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Hints and tricks thread

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Hints and tricks thread

Old 09-30-19, 09:42 AM
  #676  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,803

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked 286 Times in 220 Posts
Originally Posted by Newspaper_Nick View Post
secure the tip of the chain with the straight part of the chain whip tool.
What do you mean by that?
RubeRad is offline  
Old 09-30-19, 11:46 AM
  #677  
Newspaper_Nick
Senior Member
 
Newspaper_Nick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 129 Post(s)
Liked 67 Times in 42 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
What do you mean by that?
I did a google image search and couldn't even find one photo where they use the tool the right way. So i will try to explain. Now when you wrap the chain whip around a larger cog, the tip of the chain is on the loose, like this:



This is an invitation to disaster. As you push down the tool, and the wrench in your other hand, the chain will come loose and you will end up hurting yourself or your cassette. Now imagine if you wrap the chain around to a smaller cog. The tip will actually reach to the handle of the chain whip tool, so that you can rest the handle up against the chain itself. So you will end up with a fully engaged and secure chain. You can push your heart out and it won't come loose.
Newspaper_Nick is offline  
Old 09-30-19, 11:56 AM
  #678  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,803

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked 286 Times in 220 Posts
Oh, so if you're on a small enough cog, the tip of the tool will kind of pinch the last loose link of chain in place? I was thinking you were saying standard chain whips have an attachment point where you can/should physically attach the end of the chain. That would be a good invention, and could be hacked pretty easily just by drilling a hole, and maybe even like a paperclip could go through the last chain link and the hole just enough to keep it together
RubeRad is offline  
Old 09-30-19, 12:17 PM
  #679  
Newspaper_Nick
Senior Member
 
Newspaper_Nick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 129 Post(s)
Liked 67 Times in 42 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Oh, so if you're on a small enough cog, the tip of the tool will kind of pinch the last loose link of chain in place?
Exactly.
Newspaper_Nick is offline  
Old 10-08-19, 09:45 AM
  #680  
ChrisWagner
Sierra
 
ChrisWagner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: home
Posts: 47

Bikes: Surly Bridge Club, Priority Eight, Trek 700, '78 Motobecane Super Mirage, tt Mule

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 8 Posts
In need of a quick lint free rag, a coffee filter is aces on lint free. Not so much on the rag part but effective with alcohol and the like.
ChrisWagner is offline  
Old 10-24-19, 09:31 AM
  #681  
sjanzeir
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Posts: 500

Bikes: 1990 Raleigh Flyer; 2014 Trek 7.6 FX (size 15"); 2014 Trek 7.6 FX (size 17.5"); 2019 Dahon Mu D9

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 186 Post(s)
Liked 34 Times in 27 Posts




We were in a bit of a fix after our last 20-year-old split AC finally croaked just before a big gathering we're supposed to be having tomorrow. "Let there be Light," said the gentlemen who came to install a new one this evening. I quickly rigged up my El Cheapo Bike Hand stand with a piece of PVC piping and eight out of my nine Bontrager Ion 120 headlights.

Last edited by sjanzeir; 10-25-19 at 11:19 AM.
sjanzeir is offline  
Old 11-04-19, 04:18 PM
  #682  
curbtender
Senior Member
 
curbtender's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SF Bay Area, East bay
Posts: 5,893

Bikes: Marinoni, Kestral 200 2002 Trek 5200, KHS Flite, Koga Miyata, Schwinn Spitfire 5, Schwinn Speedster, Mondia Special, Univega Alpina, Miyata team Ti, MB3

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 665 Post(s)
Liked 165 Times in 127 Posts
A friend was telling me how he got a flat out riding his mountain bike without a tool kit. He said he was able to get the tire off and he filled it full of grass and weeds. I guess it beats walking.
curbtender is offline  
Old 11-05-19, 04:17 AM
  #683  
Newspaper_Nick
Senior Member
 
Newspaper_Nick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 129 Post(s)
Liked 67 Times in 42 Posts
If you are like me, you use jetwash machines at gas stations to wash your bike. I do it almost every week. I haven't seen any adverse effects of jetwashing my bike, i just don't aggressively spray water into the nooks and crannies where there is lube or grease (wheel hubs, bottom bracket etc.). Other than that, i think it is fair game. The bike can take it. However, a couple times have i used the soap sprayer before using the jetwash. And after each time i did that, shifters started to act up for both front and rear mechs. What i realized is that soap degreases the moving parts on the rear derailleur and the front mech and after the water is evaporated, they become completely dry. If you happen to experience any hardness in your shifting levers, just spray grease to the moving parts of your front and rear mech and that will soften the shifters.
Newspaper_Nick is offline  
Likes For Newspaper_Nick:
Old 11-14-19, 03:23 PM
  #684  
maddmaxx 
Boomer
 
maddmaxx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 7,167

Bikes: Diamondback Clarity II frame homebuilt.

Mentioned: 90 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12465 Post(s)
Liked 155 Times in 133 Posts
I posted this one years ago and it's probably time to renew. If you have some loose tools in your seat bag that rattle, put them in an old sock to quiet them. Someday on the road when you need to do something to your chain, the sock will come in handy like a work glove to keep one of your hands clean while dealing with it.
__________________
We are an empire. Be sure to use it wisely.
maddmaxx is offline  
Likes For maddmaxx:
Old 11-17-19, 09:12 PM
  #685  
elcraft
elcraft
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Greater Boston
Posts: 649
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
Liked 18 Times in 17 Posts
BITD, we used black handlebar tape to hide thee fact that you had to fiddle with your chain....
elcraft is offline  
Old 11-22-19, 07:50 AM
  #686  
Newspaper_Nick
Senior Member
 
Newspaper_Nick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 129 Post(s)
Liked 67 Times in 42 Posts
I have a great tip for old quick release hub bike owners out there. The ones with disc brakes. You probably experience this ervery time you remove the wheels from the dropouts and put them back on. You will see that 9 out of 10 times your disk brakes will rub. This used to make me go crazy and i was readjusting the calipers every time i put the wheels back on. It is especially frustrating when you are out and changing a punctured inner tube. Lately i realized that i didn't even need to touch the calipers. The solution was so simple, just turn the axle within the dropouts (before tightening the QR) to match the previous allignment of the wheel. Give this a try. Quick release axles are not perfectly straight because of the threads on them. So every time you put the wheels back on, the allignment is slightly off (one milimeter maybe), and that much of a difference is enough for the brakes to rub. Like i said, you just need to turn the axle within the dropouts before tightening the qr to find that sweet spot that was when you first removed the wheels off the bike. Just make a quarter turn and try tightening the QR and turn the wheel. If brakes rub, make another quarter turn and try again. Eventually you will find the spot and the brakes won't rub. So much easier than readjusting the brakes.
Newspaper_Nick is offline  
Old 11-22-19, 10:29 AM
  #687  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,803

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked 286 Times in 220 Posts
Why I hope every bike I buy for the rest of my life has thru-axles
RubeRad is offline  
Old 11-22-19, 03:22 PM
  #688  
Newspaper_Nick
Senior Member
 
Newspaper_Nick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 129 Post(s)
Liked 67 Times in 42 Posts
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Why I hope every bike I buy for the rest of my life has thru-axles
Where i live, thru-axle bikes are worth an arm and a leg
Newspaper_Nick is offline  
Old 11-30-19, 10:01 PM
  #689  
Bigbus
Senior Member
 
Bigbus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Central West Coast
Posts: 420

Bikes: In Flux

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 125 Post(s)
Liked 41 Times in 30 Posts
whipped up this tool in about 5 minutes with nothing more than my chain breaker, a piece of steel, and a drill. Old bike chains are everywhere.

It works pretty good too.
Bigbus is offline  
Old 12-18-19, 03:51 PM
  #690  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 71
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3105 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 32 Posts
How to tighten the valve core wihout special tools?

It was below freezing last nite, and this morning, the tire was flat. After an hour of investigation, I found out that the valve core had came loose.

I recemtly moved up higher north. And my stuff are still in boxes...and I can find anything to tighten the core.
mtb_addict is offline  
Old 12-18-19, 07:35 PM
  #691  
Vintage_Cyclist
Senior Member
 
Vintage_Cyclist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Big Apple
Posts: 1,296

Bikes: yes

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 354 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 17 Times in 14 Posts
Presta core? I usually just grab it with a pliers and tighten.
Vintage_Cyclist is offline  
Old 12-18-19, 08:47 PM
  #692  
WizardOfBoz
Generally bewildered
 
WizardOfBoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Eastern PA, USA
Posts: 2,448

Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane 6.9, 1999 LeMond Zurich, 1978 Schwinn Superior

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 892 Post(s)
Liked 147 Times in 107 Posts
Originally Posted by sjanzeir View Post




We were in a bit of a fix after our last 20-year-old split AC finally croaked just before a big gathering we're supposed to be having tomorrow. "Let there be Light," said the gentlemen who came to install a new one this evening. I quickly rigged up my El Cheapo Bike Hand stand with a piece of PVC piping and eight out of my nine Bontrager Ion 120 headlights.
Very nice. Getting the A/C working is probably pretty important in Saudi Arabia. Hope you got it up and running.
WizardOfBoz is offline  
Old 12-18-19, 08:56 PM
  #693  
WizardOfBoz
Generally bewildered
 
WizardOfBoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Eastern PA, USA
Posts: 2,448

Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane 6.9, 1999 LeMond Zurich, 1978 Schwinn Superior

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 892 Post(s)
Liked 147 Times in 107 Posts
Originally Posted by Newspaper_Nick View Post
I did a google image search and couldn't even find one photo where they use the tool the right way. So i will try to explain. Now when you wrap the chain whip around a larger cog, the tip of the chain is on the loose, like this:



This is an invitation to disaster. As you push down the tool, and the wrench in your other hand, the chain will come loose and you will end up hurting yourself or your cassette. Now imagine if you wrap the chain around to a smaller cog. The tip will actually reach to the handle of the chain whip tool, so that you can rest the handle up against the chain itself. So you will end up with a fully engaged and secure chain. You can push your heart out and it won't come loose.
I think I disagree. Putting the chain whip on the small cog gives you the the lowest possible torque (or at least the highest possible stress on the cog). If you put the chain whip on a larger cog, especially if the cog is part of an assembly (like three cogs riveted together) gives you a better purchase on the freehub.

The scenario suggested indicates an dangerous approach. Any time you are pushing on tools on the opposite side of the hub you risk barking your knuckles on the ground. Don't do that. It always pays to set things up so that the chain whip and the freehub wrench are on the same size of the hub. Set up properly you should be able to break the nut loose by squeezing the two handles together. Alternately, have both arms fully extended, one pushing the other pulling. If the nut breaks loose, you retain control.
WizardOfBoz is offline  
Old 12-19-19, 03:55 PM
  #694  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 71
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3105 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 32 Posts
Originally Posted by Vintage_Cyclist View Post
Presta core? I usually just grab it with a pliers and tighten.
schrader core. can't get the needle nose in there.
​​​
mtb_addict is offline  
Old 12-19-19, 04:27 PM
  #695  
curbtender
Senior Member
 
curbtender's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SF Bay Area, East bay
Posts: 5,893

Bikes: Marinoni, Kestral 200 2002 Trek 5200, KHS Flite, Koga Miyata, Schwinn Spitfire 5, Schwinn Speedster, Mondia Special, Univega Alpina, Miyata team Ti, MB3

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 665 Post(s)
Liked 165 Times in 127 Posts
Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
schrader core. can't get the needle nose in there.
​​​
try some tweezers.
curbtender is offline  
Old 12-20-19, 07:34 AM
  #696  
cmcanulty
Senior Member
 
cmcanulty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 420
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
tool

I got a valve tool years ago for less than one dollar.
cmcanulty is offline  
Old 12-20-19, 10:40 AM
  #697  
Bigbus
Senior Member
 
Bigbus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Central West Coast
Posts: 420

Bikes: In Flux

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 125 Post(s)
Liked 41 Times in 30 Posts
A lot of valve caps have the two prongs extended. Find them at the auto parts store for 'Shrader valves. I have one on everything I ride with Shrader valves and a spare in the tool box screwed onto a valve stem from a semi truck tire..
Bigbus is offline  
Likes For Bigbus:
Old 12-22-19, 09:51 AM
  #698  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 71
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3105 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 32 Posts
ok...my treezer sort of works. but it is too flexible. so, i not sure if it is tight enough.

i will definitely go look for some one dollar core tool.
mtb_addict is offline  
Old 12-22-19, 11:05 AM
  #699  
Bigbus
Senior Member
 
Bigbus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Central West Coast
Posts: 420

Bikes: In Flux

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 125 Post(s)
Liked 41 Times in 30 Posts
Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
ok...my treezer sort of works. but it is too flexible. so, i not sure if it is tight enough.

i will definitely go look for some one dollar core tool.
You want to be careful with that tweezers or you might damage the valve too. If the valve is in good nick it shouldn't need to be overly tightened as the rubber gasket will seal okay. Good luck and hope it works.
Bigbus is offline  
Old 12-31-19, 01:14 PM
  #700  
KDTX
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 221
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
So I was restoring an old school 20" BMX, the freewheel was stuck on and impossible to break loose. We tried putting the remover in a bench vise and turning the wheel but that didn't work. Finally I took a bike hanging hook and mounted to a stud low on the wall. Then put the wheel in the hook. Then took a 8' galvanized fence pipe and slipped it over the wrench on the remover. With just the slightest downward force (and leverage from the long pipe) the freewheel broke loose. The downward force drove the wheel in to the corner of the floor and wall. I was amazed how little force was needed with the long lever and also having the the wheel in a stable fix position. This would probably work for holding larger wheels as well to remove cassettes.
KDTX is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.