Bike Forums

Bike Forums (https://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Touring (https://www.bikeforums.net/forumdisplay.php?f=47)
-   -   Tubeless touring? (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=1129977)

Darth Lefty 12-14-17 06:44 PM

I’m trying it on my MTB and I’m pleased enough with it I’ll probably convert everything eventually. I’m not so impressed that I’m replacing any current tires or wheels to get it today, though. I just got a new Marathon so it might be a while.

rifraf 12-15-17 12:24 PM


Originally Posted by msbiker (Post 20052350)
I never could get the bead on non-tubeless tires to properly set on non-tubeless rims. Plus, I think non-tubeless tires are more prone to weeping. I have successfully used tubeless tires on non-tubeless rims.

I'm hoping to find time next week to attempt the job.
I'm utilising Velocity Dyad rims which are not tubeless designed.
I am expecting my non tubeless specific tires (Exiwolf 2.3) to weep initially but can only hope they emulate the reports of users who suggest they stop and seal well.
I'm not using the gorilla tape method, but the split tube method.
It remains to be seen what success I may have.
Wish me luck

If a second attempt is needed, I have a litre of Stans and pairs of Schwalbe tires in Big Apple and Mondial flavours.
They are all folding tires from memory.

dim 12-17-17 10:13 AM

:)

to sum it up: those (like me) who have tubeless ready rims can use fast tubeless tyres aswell as normal clinchers

those who have normal wheels cannot (The fastest tyres at this moment, according to bicycle rolling resistance website), are tubeless

I'm very happy with tubeless and use very good (very fast light) tubeless tyres .... I get to places quicker

rifraf 12-17-17 10:15 PM


Originally Posted by dim (Post 20057745)
:)
I get to places quicker

Some folks its about the destination,

Others the journey.

Theres room for all in here

dim 12-18-17 03:44 PM


Originally Posted by rifraf (Post 20058841)
Some folks its about the destination,

Others the journey.

Theres room for all in here

thats why tubeless ready rims is the best for all ....

you can choose what you want to use .... on normal rims you can't :p

rifraf 12-19-17 10:58 AM

Today I split a 406 tube down the middle and used a wet rag to clean what appeared to be talcum powder from the now exposed inner surface of the tube.

It was "fun" to stretch it to go around my 622 Velocity Dyad rim and took me some effort to get it done.

I did my best to make sure the excess that overlapped the edges of the rim, were evenly spaced by manipulating them by hand and then I added the tire.

In this case it was a 2.3 Exiwolf folding tire (not tubeless specific).

I emptied a small bottle of Stans into the tire by lifting a small section of the tire via three levers.

I refilled the small bottle of Stans and used its applicator lid to pour a little fluid around the edges of the tire to help with the sealing process.

I didn't have a compressor but managed to get the tire to blow up using my hand pump.

I put 30 psi into it and proceeded to spin the wheel trying to get the inner surface of the Exiwolf tire and the split tube coated.

I hung the tire on a hook from my garage wall and went indoors to watch TV for an hour.

I just went out to check on it and the tire is still hard.

I gave it a few more spins and have left it hanging again.

Its nearly one am here in Western Australia and I'll check the tire again in the morning to see if its held its air.

Its my first attempt at ghetto tubeless and I'm optimistic at this stage that it'll still be firm and sealed in the morning.

If not, I'll try again.

linus 12-19-17 11:04 AM


Originally Posted by rifraf (Post 20061596)
Today I split a 406 tube down the middle and used a wet rag to clean what appeared to be talcum powder from the now exposed inner surface of the tube.

It was "fun" to stretch it to go around my 622 Velocity Dyad rim and took me some effort to get it done.

I did my best to make sure the excess that overlapped the edges of the rim, were evenly spaced by manipulating them by hand and then I added the tire.

In this case it was a 2.3 Exiwolf folding tire (not tubeless specific).

I emptied a small bottle of Stans into the tire by lifting a small section of the tire via three levers.

I refilled the small bottle of Stans and used its applicator lid to pour a little fluid around the edges of the tire to help with the sealing process.

I didn't have a compressor but managed to get the tire to blow up using my hand pump.

I put 30 psi into it and proceeded to spin the wheel trying to get the inner surface of the Exiwolf tire and the split tube coated.

I hung the tire on a hook from my garage wall and went indoors to watch TV for an hour.

I just went out to check on it and the tire is still hard.

I gave it a few more spins and have left it hanging again.

Its nearly one am here in Western Australia and I'll check the tire again in the morning to see if its held its air.

Its my first attempt at ghetto tubeless and I'm optimistic at this stage that it'll still be firm and sealed in the morning.

If not, I'll try again.

Usually sealing is not an issue with setting tubeless. Burping and resealing are the issues with non-TL rims and tires. Good luck though.

rifraf 12-19-17 11:27 AM


Originally Posted by linus (Post 20061604)
Usually sealing is not an issue with setting tubeless. Burping and resealing are the issues with non-TL rims and tires. Good luck though.

Any tips or is it all down to luck as to it staying up?

I did my best to follow the method outlined here:
Ghetto tubeless conversion DIY: tips and tricks | Ridemonkey Forums

Its my first attempt and so far I'm feeling optimistic given that more than a few people told me I'd need a compressor to get them sealed enough to hold air.

I suppose the proof will be in the pudding as they say and only riding on it will let me know the outcome.

I'll resist any urge to go fast down the hill where I live until it becomes obvious as to whether I might hope for some longevity from the seal.

I've my fingers crossed it'll still be holding air when I get up in about 7 hours tomorrow morning.

nickw 12-19-17 12:38 PM


Originally Posted by rifraf (Post 20061659)
Any tips or is it all down to luck as to it staying up?

I did my best to follow the method outlined here:
Ghetto tubeless conversion DIY: tips and tricks | Ridemonkey Forums

Its my first attempt and so far I'm feeling optimistic given that more than a few people told me I'd need a compressor to get them sealed enough to hold air.

I suppose the proof will be in the pudding as they say and only riding on it will let me know the outcome.

I'll resist any urge to go fast down the hill where I live until it becomes obvious as to whether I might hope for some longevity from the seal.

I've my fingers crossed it'll still be holding air when I get up in about 7 hours tomorrow morning.

Be careful. Everybody's risk tolerance is different so take my opinion with a grain of salt. Even with Tubeless tires, when they let go/burp it can be all at once, I can only imagine if this decides it wants to go it may be catastrophic. Just keep that in mind and don't push it.

It was also written about 7 years ago when the tubeless thing was just gaining steam.

This based on $$ or time restraints?

linus 12-19-17 01:59 PM


Originally Posted by rifraf (Post 20061659)
Any tips or is it all down to luck as to it staying up?

I did my best to follow the method outlined here:
Ghetto tubeless conversion DIY: tips and tricks | Ridemonkey Forums

Its my first attempt and so far I'm feeling optimistic given that more than a few people told me I'd need a compressor to get them sealed enough to hold air.

I suppose the proof will be in the pudding as they say and only riding on it will let me know the outcome.

I'll resist any urge to go fast down the hill where I live until it becomes obvious as to whether I might hope for some longevity from the seal.

I've my fingers crossed it'll still be holding air when I get up in about 7 hours tomorrow morning.

If it holds air, you'll be fine for normal riding. My only concern with it will be if decide to you go down a hill and hit a pot hole or something... Take it easy and you'll be fine I think. You just want to try out TL setup anyway so if you like how they feel, try both TL rims and tires.

rifraf 12-19-17 11:59 PM


Originally Posted by nickw (Post 20061805)
Be careful. Everybody's risk tolerance is different so take my opinion with a grain of salt. Even with Tubeless tires, when they let go/burp it can be all at once, I can only imagine if this decides it wants to go it may be catastrophic. Just keep that in mind and don't push it.

I'll never see my 40's again so have a fairly staid approach to my riding.


Originally Posted by nickw (Post 20061805)
It was also written about 7 years ago when the tubeless thing was just gaining steam.

Yeah, well, I'm a late adapter and like to see everyone else blow their money on the latest and greatest, in order to sort the wheat from the chaff.
This approach has saved me some time and angst when new products don't last the distance.
I still occasionally jump the gun but I'm now better at restraining my emotions when it comes to purchase decisions.


Originally Posted by nickw (Post 20061805)
This based on $$ or time restraints?

Both.
My budget is constrained and my custom (Son28/Rohloff/ Cx-Ray/Dyad) wheels are only 2012 and I want a few more years out of them if I can before forking out once again for new rims/spokes/labour.
Also I wish to tour over the xmas holiday period and waiting times for bike part orders from Europe (bike24 etc) and take some weeks to get to Australia and can be weather dependant regarding delivery times.
The ghetto setup also fits in well with my tightwad nature.

rifraf 12-19-17 11:59 PM


Originally Posted by linus (Post 20061990)
If it holds air, you'll be fine for normal riding. My only concern with it will be if decide to you go down a hill and hit a pot hole or something... Take it easy and you'll be fine I think. You just want to try out TL setup anyway so if you like how they feel, try both TL rims and tires.

The advice sounds sage

Thank you

Sullalto 12-20-17 02:21 AM


Originally Posted by msbiker (Post 20052350)
I never could get the bead on non-tubeless tires to properly set on non-tubeless rims. Plus, I think non-tubeless tires are more prone to weeping. I have successfully used tubeless tires on non-tubeless rims.

Sorry, I just want to make sure I understand.

You've tried non-tubeless tires on non-tubeless rims, set up tubeless-and say it doesn't work?

staehpj1 12-20-17 07:00 AM


... I get to places quicker

Originally Posted by rifraf (Post 20058841)
Some folks its about the destination,

Others the journey.

Yes but there is another aspect to the choice. Some of us enjoy the journey more on tires with the nice road feel that supple sidewalls give; a feeling that is enhanced by running tubeless. This can be true whatever the speed we ride.

For me, running a heavy and stiff tire with thornproof tubes would suck a good deal of the joy out of the ride and that would be true whether I was riding 20 miles per day or 100 miles per day.

Also, in addition to enjoying the supple ride feel, riding faster can enhance the journey. Riding faster isn't necessarily about getting to the destination in a hurry. It can also be about the joy of riding faster.

msbiker 12-20-17 07:34 AM


Originally Posted by Sullalto (Post 20062920)
Sorry, I just want to make sure I understand.

You've tried non-tubeless tires on non-tubeless rims, set up tubeless-and say it doesn't work?

Correct, for me at least. I've used tubeless tires on a non-tubeless rim, using gorilla tape on the rim to run tubeless. That has worked fine. But I never could get non-tubeless tires to run tubeless on a non-tubeless rim. But you might be successful with that. The best bet is, of course, to use tubeless ready tires on a tubeless ready rim.

Sullalto 12-20-17 08:50 AM

I feel like nothing being tubeless compatible and not working tubeless is expected behavior and not surprising.


Originally Posted by msbiker (Post 20063059)
The best bet is, of course, to use tubeless ready tires on a tubeless ready rim.

Yes, I suspect so.

JohnJ80 12-20-17 09:39 AM


Originally Posted by rifraf (Post 20062863)
The ghetto setup also fits in well with my tightwad nature.

I'd be very nervous with this setup especially in the front. If it fails, the results could be catastrophic which would be serious false economy. There is no way to know that it won't fail this way.

None of the components were designed with this in mind and the manufacturers would, I'm sure, emphatically warn you not to do this.

J.

rifraf 12-20-17 09:59 AM


Originally Posted by linus (Post 20061990)
If it holds air, you'll be fine for normal riding. My only concern with it will be if decide to you go down a hill and hit a pot hole or something... Take it easy and you'll be fine I think. You just want to try out TL setup anyway so if you like how they feel, try both TL rims and tires.

Well it was still up this morning.
Earlier this evening I went for a spin of around 10km.
So far so good.
I won't be looking to get any air with this setup.
My riding style is fairly staid and sedate.
If its still up tomorrow morning then I'll likely do the rear wheel as well.
This year there has been an abundance of thorns locally where I am so I've found myself disinclined to ride and want to remedy that.
I hope the Stans will mitigate the punctures enough to get me back in the saddle and riding again.
I'll try to take your advice on taking it easy and avoiding big hits.:thumb:

rifraf 12-20-17 10:08 AM


Originally Posted by JohnJ80 (Post 20063239)
I'd be very nervous with this setup especially in the front. If it fails, the results could be catastrophic which would be serious false economy. There is no way to know that it won't fail this way.

None of the components were designed with this in mind and the manufacturers would, I'm sure, emphatically warn you not to do this.

J.

Thanks for your concern.:thumb:
Its a stop gap measure and I'll revisit a purchase decision of proper tubeless rims/tires next winter if the setup lasts that long.
For the tour I'm speculating about, I'll take a couple of tubes with me in case of a major failure, and will ride accordingly.
I'll be towing a trailer with around 20 litres of water so won't be going very fast, assuming the BB7's keep working:lol:

rifraf 12-20-17 10:11 AM


Originally Posted by staehpj1 (Post 20063024)
Yes but there is another aspect to the choice. Some of us enjoy the journey more on tires with the nice road feel that supple sidewalls give; a feeling that is enhanced by running tubeless. This can be true whatever the speed we ride.

For me, running a heavy and stiff tire with thornproof tubes would suck a good deal of the joy out of the ride and that would be true whether I was riding 20 miles per day or 100 miles per day.

Also, in addition to enjoying the supple ride feel, riding faster can enhance the journey. Riding faster isn't necessarily about getting to the destination in a hurry. It can also be about the joy of riding faster.

True indeed

DropBarFan 03-29-20 12:19 AM

I was looking for new tires recently & was surprised to see some nice touring tires available in tubeless-ready. The bike already has tubeless-ready rims so I'm thinking why not try the Schwalbe G-One Speed tire with tubeless. Actually I've never had a flat with Schwalbe tires incl light Supremes but tubeless could be nice insurance against a flat at an inconvenient time. The sealant & valves are not that expensive. I'm not good at patching tubes anyway so it's possible tubeless could be cheaper in the long run.

Riders who use a heavier tire to avoid flats can save a lot of rotating weight by switching to a lighter tubeless tire. Schwalbe says tubeless is the future, & they don't seem like the types to make idle inflated claims (pun intended).

djb 03-29-20 08:34 AM

Let us know how it goes. Here I just don't have the need, and patching is so easy and permanent that this is not an issue, so don't really understand you finding it problematic.
be aware that keeping on top of sealant drying up over time, if bike not used for a while.
also the required sudden fast high pressure to seat a tire.
This is another reason for me to not be interested, for now, but will probably learn one day if a trip required it.

I've gone through the steps of learning disc brake stuff and lots of mistakes, so can learn this stuff too one day I guess.

as you say though, lighter and more flexible supple tires do become addictive.
re touring,I still think it is still specific to thorny areas.
May change my mind on this one day.

JohnJ80 03-29-20 08:57 AM


Originally Posted by djb (Post 21389361)
Let us know how it goes. Here I just don't have the need, and patching is so easy and permanent that this is not an issue, so don't really understand you finding it problematic.
be aware that keeping on top of sealant drying up over time, if bike not used for a while.
also the required sudden fast high pressure to seat a tire.
This is another reason for me to not be interested, for now, but will probably learn one day if a trip required it.

I've gone through the steps of learning disc brake stuff and lots of mistakes, so can learn this stuff too one day I guess.

as you say though, lighter and more flexible supple tires do become addictive.
re touring,I still think it is still specific to thorny areas.
May change my mind on this one day.

Iíve been riding tubeless for about 10 years now, starting with tubeless tubulars (Tufo etc..) and now for the last several years with tubeless clinchers.

What I have discovered is that there is no difference in flat performance between the tubulars and the tubeless clinchers. In both cases I get 1 flat in about 5000 or so miles compared to 10 or so in that same mileage. So I think that weíre going to find that tubeless is inherently more reliable than with a tube. I have to say, I really enjoy largely eliminating flats.

The advantage, at least for tubeless clinchers is that if you do get a flat, if you canít repair it on the spot and on the rim with one of the pluggers, then worst case, you remove the valve from the rim and install a tube.

That then gives all the traditional contingencies such as patching the tube should it fail again or a tire boot for a slashed tire etc...

So based on that, I can find no reason to not switch to tubeless at least for the touring I do. In point of fact, going tubeless probably gives your more contingency/backup that going with a straight tubed setup would. And you also get all the riding benefits of lower rolling weight, better and more supple ride.

rifraf 03-30-20 04:45 AM


Originally Posted by rifraf (Post 20063285)
Well it was still up this morning.
Earlier this evening I went for a spin of around 10km.
So far so good.
I won't be looking to get any air with this setup.
My riding style is fairly staid and sedate.
If its still up tomorrow morning then I'll likely do the rear wheel as well.
This year there has been an abundance of thorns locally where I am so I've found myself disinclined to ride and want to remedy that.
I hope the Stans will mitigate the punctures enough to get me back in the saddle and riding again.
I'll try to take your advice on taking it easy and avoiding big hits.:thumb:

Many Km's later and a couple of tire replacements, I'm still riding my Velocity Dyad Ghetto tubeless setup and see no need as yet to update to tubeless rims/specific tires here in 2020

staehpj1 03-30-20 07:03 AM


Originally Posted by rifraf (Post 21390906)
Many Km's later and a couple of tire replacements, I'm still riding my Velocity Dyad Ghetto tubeless setup and see no need as yet to update to tubeless rims/specific tires here in 2020

I usually hate to see zombie threads come back, but thanks for checking back in. I sometimes hate to read what I said years ago, but in this case I'd probably say exactly the same thing today.

I found myself annoyed again reading comments about how the only benefit was puncture resistance when it might not even be the biggest benefit in my mind. Puncture resistance is awesome, but so is the supple ride. I am still loving the tubeless on my mountain bike with the lack of flats and awesome ride, but have not yet toured on tubeless. I'd definitely consider tubeless if building up a new set of wheels for touring. I'd consider ghetto tubeless, but doubt the wisdom of it for the skinny tires I have been UL touring on. I sometimes think of going to wider tires and trying it, but I am riding a road bike with narrow rims and doubt the setup for ghetto tubeless.

djb 03-30-20 08:15 AM


Originally Posted by JohnJ80 (Post 21389420)
Iíve been riding tubeless for about 10 years now, starting with tubeless tubulars (Tufo etc..) and now for the last several years with tubeless clinchers.

What I have discovered is that there is no difference in flat performance between the tubulars and the tubeless clinchers. In both cases I get 1 flat in about 5000 or so miles compared to 10 or so in that same mileage. So I think that weíre going to find that tubeless is inherently more reliable than with a tube. I have to say, I really enjoy largely eliminating flats.

The advantage, at least for tubeless clinchers is that if you do get a flat, if you canít repair it on the spot and on the rim with one of the pluggers, then worst case, you remove the valve from the rim and install a tube.

That then gives all the traditional contingencies such as patching the tube should it fail again or a tire boot for a slashed tire etc...

So based on that, I can find no reason to not switch to tubeless at least for the touring I do. In point of fact, going tubeless probably gives your more contingency/backup that going with a straight tubed setup would. And you also get all the riding benefits of lower rolling weight, better and more supple ride.

good sales job, and I do value people's experience with any new thing. I'm sure I will try it sometime.
re flats, in my riding reality, I get maybe one flat per year, some years no flats. Ride an average of 5000kms per year. Rode all winter this year and touch wood no flats running lowish pressures on old school mtb tires, cheapo clunkers.

From a devils advocate angle, nice feeling tires like the supreme , tubed, have been great for nearly 0 flats during three long heavily loaded tours, same tires, so to me if there aren't thorn issues, this combo works, rides nicely, is robust enough to handle a fair amount of road debris in 7 countries and rough roads galore, so I have less incentive to change knowing I can ride through Latin American countries or a gravelly road in Canada and be okay, touch wood touch wood!

but again, hearing all the clearly positive aspects from many people like you is encouraging, just as it was for me about disc brakes from folks off doing far off tours with them with success.

oh I'd be a bit concerned about below freezing 0c temps and sealant. Would have to learn about that too.

zebkedic 03-30-20 08:31 AM

Tubeless on the ECR and so far loving it. If you go tubeless, check out the Stan's DART for repair. Great for large punctures and slices.

JohnJ80 03-30-20 10:05 AM


Originally Posted by djb (Post 21391157)
good sales job, and I do value people's experience with any new thing. I'm sure I will try it sometime.
re flats, in my riding reality, I get maybe one flat per year, some years no flats. Ride an average of 5000kms per year. Rode all winter this year and touch wood no flats running lowish pressures on old school mtb tires, cheapo clunkers.

From a devils advocate angle, nice feeling tires like the supreme , tubed, have been great for nearly 0 flats during three long heavily loaded tours, same tires, so to me if there aren't thorn issues, this combo works, rides nicely, is robust enough to handle a fair amount of road debris in 7 countries and rough roads galore, so I have less incentive to change knowing I can ride through Latin American countries or a gravelly road in Canada and be okay, touch wood touch wood!

but again, hearing all the clearly positive aspects from many people like you is encouraging, just as it was for me about disc brakes from folks off doing far off tours with them with success.

oh I'd be a bit concerned about below freezing 0c temps and sealant. Would have to learn about that too.

I do agree that where you ride and the kinds of road hazards and debris you encounter is part of it and thatís probably most of the variance in ride reports on a given tire.

A couple of comments:

1. I did ride this Schwalbe G-1 Speeds set up tubeless in a 30mm tire down the rock garden that is the Rallervegen in Norway. I really should have been on a bigger tire or an MTB. Both my wife and I had it set up this way neither had a flat. I consider that an over stress situation for that tire but it was just fine.

2. Orange Seal makes a sealant that goes down to cold temperatures. I ride during the winter here in Minnesota on my fat bike and itís been fine. I will usually ride, depending on snow conditions, down as low as -5F/-21C. Many ride much colder than that even. So I donít have any concerns about sealant.

As always, if I did get a flat that the sealant or my Dynaplug plugger couldnít repair, there is always the option of throwing in a tube which is about as difficult as it would be on a tubed set up. So thereís a lot of upside and very little downside. Main downside is wheel cost if youíre not tubeless ready and investing the time to give it a try.

djb 03-30-20 12:36 PM


Originally Posted by JohnJ80 (Post 21391385)
I do agree that where you ride and the kinds of road hazards and debris you encounter is part of it and thatís probably most of the variance in ride reports on a given tire.

A couple of comments:

1. I did ride this Schwalbe G-1 Speeds set up tubeless in a 30mm tire down the rock garden that is the Rallervegen in Norway. I really should have been on a bigger tire or an MTB. Both my wife and I had it set up this way neither had a flat. I consider that an over stress situation for that tire but it was just fine.

2. Orange Seal makes a sealant that goes down to cold temperatures. I ride during the winter here in Minnesota on my fat bike and itís been fine. I will usually ride, depending on snow conditions, down as low as -5F/-21C. Many ride much colder than that even. So I donít have any concerns about sealant.

As always, if I did get a flat that the sealant or my Dynaplug plugger couldnít repair, there is always the option of throwing in a tube which is about as difficult as it would be on a tubed set up. So thereís a lot of upside and very little downside. Main downside is wheel cost if youíre not tubeless ready and investing the time to give it a try.

interesting points. Neat to see that sealant can work in cold, I kinda figured it must, knowing that most likely some winter riders use it. This is all new to me, so didnt know that.

re tires, because when I tour I nearly always have a fair amount of weight on bike, so 30, 40 or more lbs at times, I will still always go with a reasonably tough tire. The Supremes were really really impressive, especially given my Mexico and Central America trips, where although I was always careful watching for debris, I did ride through a crapload of glass and rough roads.

again, thanks for the insights and your experience. always interesting to read.

DropBarFan 03-30-20 06:55 PM


Originally Posted by djb (Post 21389361)
Let us know how it goes. Here I just don't have the need, and patching is so easy and permanent that this is not an issue, so don't really understand you finding it problematic.
be aware that keeping on top of sealant drying up over time, if bike not used for a while.
also the required sudden fast high pressure to seat a tire.
This is another reason for me to not be interested, for now, but will probably learn one day if a trip required it.

I've gone through the steps of learning disc brake stuff and lots of mistakes, so can learn this stuff too one day I guess.

as you say though, lighter and more flexible supple tires do become addictive.
re touring,I still think it is still specific to thorny areas.
May change my mind on this one day.

I wouldn't switch out a good pair of tubed tires just to get tubeless flat resistance but I want to get new (slimmer lighter) tires anyway. I haven't had a flat in 3 years but maybe the next flat happens on tour when it's cold & dark & rainy & I'm behind schedule? Adding sealant can be done at home at one's leisure. The tubeless process seems pretty easy. Some folks say they've been able to mount tires with a regular floor pump, otherwise if I had to take the wheels to a local gas station that would be easy enough.


Originally Posted by JohnJ80 (Post 21391385)
1. I did ride this Schwalbe G-1 Speeds set up tubeless in a 30mm tire down the rock garden that is the Rallervegen in Norway. I really should have been on a bigger tire or an MTB. Both my wife and I had it set up this way neither had a flat. I consider that an over stress situation for that tire but it was just fine.

G-One BTW has nice choice of sizes & widths in the tubeless-easy option. Marathon Supreme tubeless-easy only in 622 diameter.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:02 PM.


Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.