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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

PeterLYoung 10-11-18 02:43 AM


Originally Posted by JaccoW (Post 20585499)
Received a set of Sturmey Archer cable pulleys today.

They have some... patina but roll well. Going to give them a good clean and polish and probably sell the leftovers on eBay again.
http://i.imgur.com/CfKf2XTh.jpg

Does anyone know if these can be disassembled safely?

Soak them in Gasoline or WD40 for a few days (or longer) then clamp the frame clamp ring in a vice and use a 'very good fit' screwdriver you should be able to remove the screws. I have just done this on a pulley from a 1936 BSA Roadster with success.
Good Luck.

gster 10-11-18 04:18 AM


Originally Posted by groth (Post 20610175)
I've finished the resurrection (at least for now) and as promised here are some photos and the story of the bike.

Actually, I made a web page with photos and the history:

Resurrecting an English Racer, Fall, 2018

Here is the main text from the web page:

Yes, I know itís not a racer! But I had a bike like this when I was a kid. It followed a single speed coaster brake bike. Compared to that bike it was an English Racer, which is what all the kids in the neighborhood called it in the early and mid 1950s!

Jane surprised me with a new bike. My memory is that it was a Christmas present in 1972 or 1973. Iím pretty sure it had to be then because I associate the bike with where we were living at the time: Magie apartments - junior faculty housing at Princeton University. We lived there from summer, 1971 to summer, 1974. and Iím sure it wasnít the first Christmas we were there. As part of resurrecting the bike, I found the date code on the hub. Itís January, 1972. So, itís Christmas, 1972. Itís conceivable that it was for my birthday in May, but Iím going to stick with Christmas!

Over the years I got it out for various things. I remember taking it to Woods Hole for a conference in the early 1980s, and taking it on the ferry to Marthaís Vineyard, where a group of us rode to a beach house for a party.

Around 1996 I started cycling seriously and used this bike. The first picture below shows the bike as it was in 1997. Itís pretty much as it came from the bike shop at that point. I no longer have the original seat bag. I still have the baskets although Iíve removed them. Canít believe i rode it with the seat so low!

I believe I added a cyclometer and possibly a mirror. I also probably had to add a new indicator chain, and a new cotter (I found a mangled one in a parts box in the basement).

I had thought to ride it in the 1998 RAGBRAI, but finally decided it didnít have wide enough gearing and bought a Bianchi Volpe. This pretty much consigned the bike to storage until I decided in late summer, 2018 to resurrect the bike for the more upright riding position to help with wrist pain, at least for relatively short, flat rides.

By the time I started taking photos of the process, I had already replaced the rims and brake pads, done a good cleaning, and got plenty of oil in the front and rear hubs.

I may still need to service the rear hub. Weíll see.

So far as I know, the bike is original except for: rims, pedals, brake blocks, indicator chain, cotters, seat bag, tubes and tires. I also added a mirror.

The bike is the 21 inch size. The chain ring has 46 teeth and the rear sprocket has 17 (apparently an unusual number!). So the gearing is 53, 70, and 94 gear inches. My Trek has a gear range of 16 to 107 gear inches (quite a bit lower than the stock gearing). The Sports weighs about 36 lbs.


Here are a couple of photos:

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...355f08a56b.jpg

My son with his Schwinn 10-speed on the right and my Sports on the left. We were getting ready to ride the MHCC half century on September 9, 1997.


https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...2a2bb2da2b.jpg

The Sports as it looked on October 11, 2018.

More photos on the web page cited above.

- Ed

Classic!

JaccoW 10-11-18 05:33 AM


Originally Posted by PeterLYoung (Post 20610735)
Soak them in Gasoline or WD40 for a few days (or longer) then clamp the frame clamp ring in a vice and use a 'very good fit' screwdriver you should be able to remove the screws. I have just done this on a pulley from a 1936 BSA Roadster with success.
Good Luck.

Good tip, thanks!

groth 10-11-18 09:39 AM


Originally Posted by PeterLYoung (Post 20610725)
BigChief is correct that with experience you can tell on traditional frames the size in the way he says.
If you measure from the centre of the bottom bracket to the top of the seat tube it should measure 23"
Regards

Thanks. I did and measured 23 inches. Previously I had made some measurements (not between the correct points) and got numbers that were closer to 21 than 23 inches. Web page corrected.

Also discovered some photos I took way back on April 24, when I started this project. Had forgotten about them. They show lots of rust.

https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...58ce58b022.jpg
Sports as it looked on April 24, 2018. Rideable, but just barely.

https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...340ef358df.jpg
Not to mention rusty!

- Ed

BigChief 10-11-18 02:54 PM


Originally Posted by groth (Post 20611231)
Thanks. I did and measured 23 inches. Previously I had made some measurements (not between the correct points) and got numbers that were closer to 21 than 23 inches. Web page corrected.

Also discovered some photos I took way back on April 24, when I started this project. Had forgotten about them. They show lots of rust.

https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...58ce58b022.jpg
Sports as it looked on April 24, 2018. Rideable, but just barely.

https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...340ef358df.jpg
Not to mention rusty!

- Ed

Nice job! If you have any other pictures of the project as it was coming along, post em here. We enjoy the nuts and bolts side of project bikes too.
Pictures can be deceiving, but the rims don't look too bad to me. 40h/32h Raleigh dual purpose rims are hard to find. They don't have to be perfect to be desirable. For 26" wheel roadsters with rod brakes, they're essential.

52telecaster 10-11-18 09:52 PM


Originally Posted by groth (Post 20610175)
I've finished the resurrection (at least for now) and as promised here are some photos and the story of the bike.

Actually, I made a web page with photos and the history:

Resurrecting an English Racer, Fall, 2018

Here is the main text from the web page:

Yes, I know itís not a racer! But I had a bike like this when I was a kid. It followed a single speed coaster brake bike. Compared to that bike it was an English Racer, which is what all the kids in the neighborhood called it in the early and mid 1950s!

Jane surprised me with a new bike. My memory is that it was a Christmas present in 1972 or 1973. Iím pretty sure it had to be then because I associate the bike with where we were living at the time: Magie apartments - junior faculty housing at Princeton University. We lived there from summer, 1971 to summer, 1974. and Iím sure it wasnít the first Christmas we were there. As part of resurrecting the bike, I found the date code on the hub. Itís January, 1972. So, itís Christmas, 1972. Itís conceivable that it was for my birthday in May, but Iím going to stick with Christmas!

Over the years I got it out for various things. I remember taking it to Woods Hole for a conference in the early 1980s, and taking it on the ferry to Marthaís Vineyard, where a group of us rode to a beach house for a party.

Around 1996 I started cycling seriously and used this bike. The first picture below shows the bike as it was in 1997. Itís pretty much as it came from the bike shop at that point. I no longer have the original seat bag. I still have the baskets although Iíve removed them. Canít believe i rode it with the seat so low!

I believe I added a cyclometer and possibly a mirror. I also probably had to add a new indicator chain, and a new cotter (I found a mangled one in a parts box in the basement).

I had thought to ride it in the 1998 RAGBRAI, but finally decided it didnít have wide enough gearing and bought a Bianchi Volpe. This pretty much consigned the bike to storage until I decided in late summer, 2018 to resurrect the bike for the more upright riding position to help with wrist pain, at least for relatively short, flat rides.

By the time I started taking photos of the process, I had already replaced the rims and brake pads, done a good cleaning, and got plenty of oil in the front and rear hubs.

I may still need to service the rear hub. Weíll see.

So far as I know, the bike is original except for: rims, pedals, brake blocks, indicator chain, cotters, seat bag, tubes and tires. I also added a mirror.

The bike is the 21 inch size. The chain ring has 46 teeth and the rear sprocket has 17 (apparently an unusual number!). So the gearing is 53, 70, and 94 gear inches. My Trek has a gear range of 16 to 107 gear inches (quite a bit lower than the stock gearing). The Sports weighs about 36 lbs.


Here are a couple of photos:

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...355f08a56b.jpg

My son with his Schwinn 10-speed on the right and my Sports on the left. We were getting ready to ride the MHCC half century on September 9, 1997.


https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...2a2bb2da2b.jpg

The Sports as it looked on October 11, 2018.

More photos on the web page cited above.

- Ed

awesome

BigChief 10-12-18 05:00 AM


Originally Posted by PeterLYoung (Post 20610232)
I found this 1936 BSA Roadster at an auction, It has BSA Three Speed plus Hub Brakes Front & Rear. It is Model 602DX Serial Number WD29996 and cost £6-12/6d when new. I have not found another when searching on-line so far. I also cannot find a spare 3Speed BSA Rear Hub with combined Hub Brake for spares though at present all works OK. I have now stripped it all completely and am rebuilding it after repainting as paintwork was very poor as it had been badly hand painted by a previous owner. Mechanically it was in good shape and all components just needed cleaning, de rusting and repainting. Frame is being powder coated and I have new transfers.
Hope to have it all finished and back on the road for next summer.
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...2f28018533.png


https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...c79af02872.jpg
https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...a084c4f36c.jpg
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...41e513ad38.jpg
https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...da185a0978.jpg

I thought I'd pass this along. That fellow in Greece is selling those short stubby pre war handlebar grips that came on this type rod brake roadster NOS. I wonder where he finds stuff like this. German, but they look very similar to the English grips in the catalog scans.
rod brake grips

PeterLYoung 10-12-18 06:19 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20612455)
I thought I'd pass this along. That fellow in Greece is selling those short stubby pre war handlebar grips that came on this type rod brake roadster NOS. I wonder where he finds stuff like this. German, but they look very similar to the English grips in the catalog scans.
rod brake grips

i bought the Handlebar Grips from my local Bike Shop, I was amazed they had them in stock. The bike had grips made from Radiator type hose when I bought it, they were horrible.

BigChief 10-12-18 09:02 AM


Originally Posted by PeterLYoung (Post 20612528)
i bought the Handlebar Grips from my local Bike Shop, I was amazed they had them in stock. The bike had grips made from Radiator type hose when I bought it, they were horrible.

Those are fine. They are the DARE style grips Raleigh used from the late 60s on. Back in the 30s and 40s, I noticed from a few examples and catalog scans that the rod braked roadsters like yours seemed to always have these short grips. From the old scan you posted, looks like the BSA's had them also. I was shopping for old style grips for my 51 Rudge when I found those on eBay, but I was searching for the longer fat type.
Ah...I knew I saved a picture.

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...4b3d459681.jpg

groth 10-12-18 04:19 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20611806)
Nice job! If you have any other pictures of the project as it was coming along, post em here. We enjoy the nuts and bolts side of project bikes too.
Pictures can be deceiving, but the rims don't look too bad to me. 40h/32h Raleigh dual purpose rims are hard to find. They don't have to be perfect to be desirable. For 26" wheel roadsters with rod brakes, they're essential.

Well, I still have the rims.

Trying to make the bike rideable, including in wet conditions, I replaced the brake pads with salmon pads. But the braking was still awful, mainly because the rims had substantial dents in the braking surface. So I decided to replace the rims. The first step was to take the front wheel off and make sure I could turn all the nipples. Penetrating oil! Once I was sure I could do that, I ordered a sun cr18 26 x 1-3/8 32 hole rim. I placed the wheel on top of the new rim (lining up the valve holes) and moved the bottom layer of spokes one at a time to the new rim, then the top layer of spokes. This way I didn't actually have to take the spokes out of the hub and relace them. Thought this was clever, and I'm sure other people have also used this technique. I was well along in this process when I noticed the left side spokes were attached to the rim in the right side holes and vice versa. Turns out the sun rims have the opposite parity of the originals. I suppose if I were a purist, I would have relaced everything. Instead, I undid the attachment to the rim and rotated the rims relative to each other by one spoke spaceing and started over. If you look closely at the photos in this thread, you'll notice the valve stems are one spoke spacing from where they should be. At this point I made sure I could turn all the nipples in the rear wheel, and once I could do that, I ordered a 40h rim, a tensiometer, nicer spoke wrenches, and rim tape. I already had a truing stand and a dish gauge. Turns out the tensiometer was only slightly useful in tensioning and truing the wheels.

As mentioned, I still have the rims:

https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...4caec8d20c.jpgRear on the left, front on the right.

https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...1fea92ac79.jpg
Bad dent in the rear rim.

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...548824f31b.jpg
Same rear rim dent from the other side.

https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...732951899b.jpg
Bad dent in the front rim.

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...0f62a36d04.jpg
Same front rim dent from the other side.

I could not think of any sure way to make a smooth braking surface where the dents are, and that's why I replaced the rims.

I think these rims would be dangerous to ride. But if someone wants them, I'm happy to give them away.

If you're not too far from Pennington, NJ, you could drop by and pick them up. Otherwise, pay the cost of shipping.

- Ed

BigChief 10-12-18 04:48 PM

I see, Yeah, the dents are pretty bad. Looks unusable to me too. We are very fortunate that CR-18s are available in 32/40h. These and the salmon Kool Stops were an excellent choice IMO.

markk900 10-13-18 10:17 AM

I bought a set of CR18's to replace the similar rims on the 49 humber (rims are in decent shape except a very poor/chrome pitted braking surface)....I didn't do it yet because I found the CR18s were significantly narrower. Have you found that to make a difference on yours?

PeterLYoung 10-13-18 10:45 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20612806)
Those are fine. They are the DARE style grips Raleigh used from the late 60s on. Back in the 30s and 40s, I noticed from a few examples and catalog scans that the rod braked roadsters like yours seemed to always have these short grips. From the old scan you posted, looks like the BSA's had them also. I was shopping for old style grips for my 51 Rudge when I found those on eBay, but I was searching for the longer fat type.
Ah...I knew I saved a picture.

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...4b3d459681.jpg

Thats a really nice bike, I see you have hub brakes (Raleigh patten?). Chrome looks in V good condition, did you have to re-chrome the brightwork? I face this dilemma as I don't want to over restore but items like rims/spokes are pretty rusted on my BSA and once you go beyond a certain point the impetus changes to go the whole hog and you end up with a brand new vintage bike!!!
Incidentally a great way of de-rusting bike components which I have used a lot is soak all the parts in White Vinegar for 3/4 days. When you take them out a light brushing with a copper/brass wire brush brings them up like new. It works well with pitted chrome too without damaging the chrome. For larger parts I purchase multiple gallon containers of vinegar and put say 4 gallons in a plastic storagecrate and whole handlebar assemblies can be dropped in, works a treat and no elbow grease required!!!

agmetal 10-13-18 12:22 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20612806)
Those are fine. They are the DARE style grips Raleigh used from the late 60s on. Back in the 30s and 40s, I noticed from a few examples and catalog scans that the rod braked roadsters like yours seemed to always have these short grips. From the old scan you posted, looks like the BSA's had them also. I was shopping for old style grips for my 51 Rudge when I found those on eBay, but I was searching for the longer fat type.
Ah...I knew I saved a picture.

https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...4b3d459681.jpg

This isn't the one that was on Boston CL recently-ish, is it?

BigChief 10-13-18 03:34 PM

Yes. Not mine. I keep a collection of pictures for reference. I posted it now because it has it's original short grips. I was hunting vintage grips for my Rudge project and saw that fellow in Greece had some German NOS short grips that look very similar to the very few survivors I see in pictures and the grainy catalog scans of rod braked roadsters from the 30s and 40s. I was shopping for a 51 Rudge Sports, so they weren't what I was looking for. I just figured Peter might be interested since he has a suitable bike.

PeterLYoung 10-13-18 04:01 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20614739)
Yes. Not mine. I keep a collection of pictures for reference. I posted it now because it has it's original short grips. I was hunting vintage grips for my Rudge project and saw that fellow in Greece had some German NOS short grips that look very similar to the very few survivors I see in pictures and the grainy catalog scans of rod braked roadsters from the 30s and 40s. I was shopping for a 51 Rudge Sports, so they weren't what I was looking for. I just figured Peter might be interested since he has a suitable bike.

Appreciate your help on this but where is the fellow in Greece who has these, is it on ebay? I will try looking.
regards Peter

PeterLYoung 10-13-18 04:05 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20614739)
Yes. Not mine. I keep a collection of pictures for reference. I posted it now because it has it's original short grips. I was hunting vintage grips for my Rudge project and saw that fellow in Greece had some German NOS short grips that look very similar to the very few survivors I see in pictures and the grainy catalog scans of rod braked roadsters from the 30s and 40s. I was shopping for a 51 Rudge Sports, so they weren't what I was looking for. I just figured Peter might be interested since he has a suitable bike.

Found these!! They are 80mm long.
https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...1f620e5800.png

PeterLYoung 10-13-18 04:12 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20614739)
Yes. Not mine. I keep a collection of pictures for reference. I posted it now because it has it's original short grips. I was hunting vintage grips for my Rudge project and saw that fellow in Greece had some German NOS short grips that look very similar to the very few survivors I see in pictures and the grainy catalog scans of rod braked roadsters from the 30s and 40s. I was shopping for a 51 Rudge Sports, so they weren't what I was looking for. I just figured Peter might be interested since he has a suitable bike.

Found him, but he wants $39 a set. way too much to pay:-
https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...2d9ced3e07.png

52telecaster 10-13-18 06:03 PM

My winter ride is shaping up with an aluminum shelled aw.
 
This is really pretty far from what u guys do but it's my current 3 speed plus triple crank. Studded tires and a dynamo hub make it good for lights as well.https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...4713a4ed8c.jpg

Honusms 10-13-18 06:08 PM

Love that Puch mixte! Grace plus function!

tigervw78 10-13-18 07:52 PM

I picked up a 60's Sports from a coop a few weeks ago. I'd like to make it my daily commuter. It didn't have a seat so I took the vinyl sprung saddle from the 72 Sports. I'm thinking of sticking with the vinyl instead of a Brooks so I don't have to worry about staining. Will Kool stops provide enough stopping power with the original rims, or should I try to build alloy wheels? I've never built wheels before. Can I reuse the original spokes? I just ordered a 24T cog so I can use 3rd as the main gear. It's not really hilly in my area except for one bridge over a harbor, but I want the ride to be easy on my knees...

BigChief 10-13-18 07:54 PM

Yes it is expensive. I just thought I'd mention them. The others seem like a good deal.

52telecaster 10-13-18 08:37 PM


Originally Posted by tigervw78 (Post 20615031)
I picked up a 60's Sports from a coop a few weeks ago. I'd like to make it my daily commuter. It didn't have a seat so I took the vinyl sprung saddle from the 72 Sports. I'm thinking of sticking with the vinyl instead of a Brooks so I don't have to worry about staining. Will Kool stops provide enough stopping power with the original rims, or should I try to build alloy wheels? I've never built wheels before. Can I reuse the original spokes? I just ordered a 24T cog so I can use 3rd as the main gear. It's not really hilly in my area except for one bridge over a harbor, but I want the ride to be easy on my knees...

you can reuse spokes if the rims have a similar dimension. You might get away with it using cr18s. Its a cool way to build a new wheel if you have never done it before. If you do need new spokes, dans comp will take care of you about as cheaply as you can get. 24 tooth sounds like a good idea to me.

desconhecido 10-14-18 12:29 AM


Originally Posted by tigervw78 (Post 20615031)
I picked up a 60's Sports from a coop a few weeks ago. I'd like to make it my daily commuter. It didn't have a seat so I took the vinyl sprung saddle from the 72 Sports. I'm thinking of sticking with the vinyl instead of a Brooks so I don't have to worry about staining. Will Kool stops provide enough stopping power with the original rims, or should I try to build alloy wheels? I've never built wheels before. Can I reuse the original spokes? I just ordered a 24T cog so I can use 3rd as the main gear. It's not really hilly in my area except for one bridge over a harbor, but I want the ride to be easy on my knees...

t's been a while since I measured Raleigh Pattern rims, but my recollectiion is that you can use the same length spokes when building with CR18s that were used with the Raleigh rims. Assuming the same lacing pattern is required. My recollection is that the original spokes may be a tad longer than what you would calculate (1 or 2 mm) but the CR18s have a nice deep socket for the eyelets and there is little danger of having spokes contact the rim tape. Use good rim tapes or strips like Schwalbe blue tape or velox or something.

Within the last week, a poster above described replacing Raleigh rims with CR18 rims and the fact that the spoke pattern does not ideally match up exactly because the Raleigh rims and CR18s have the right and left spoke holes in a different relationship to the valve hole.


My personal preference is to measure the CR18 rims and your hubs, calculate the spoke lengths and use new spokes and nipples, Lots of good instruction material on how to lace and true wheels. New stainless spokes are easier for me to deal with and they look good and last a long time.

groth 10-14-18 05:10 AM


Originally Posted by markk900 (Post 20614422)
I bought a set of CR18's to replace the similar rims on the 49 humber (rims are in decent shape except a very poor/chrome pitted braking surface)....I didn't do it yet because I found the CR18s were significantly narrower. Have you found that to make a difference on yours?

Narrower rims seem to work fine - there was even enough travel in the brake adjustments that I didn't have to reclamp the brake cables.

- Ed

gster 10-14-18 05:13 AM


Originally Posted by tigervw78 (Post 20615031)
I picked up a 60's Sports from a coop a few weeks ago. I'd like to make it my daily commuter. It didn't have a seat so I took the vinyl sprung saddle from the 72 Sports. I'm thinking of sticking with the vinyl instead of a Brooks so I don't have to worry about staining. Will Kool stops provide enough stopping power with the original rims, or should I try to build alloy wheels? I've never built wheels before. Can I reuse the original spokes? I just ordered a 24T cog so I can use 3rd as the main gear. It's not really hilly in my area except for one bridge over a harbor, but I want the ride to be easy on my knees...

24T seems too big a cog to me. It would make 1st so low that I doubt you'd even use it.
I've been happy with a 20T or 22T swap.
let us know your experience with the 24T.

BigChief 10-14-18 05:42 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20615345)
24T seems too big a cog to me. It would make 1st so low that I doubt you'd even use it.
I've been happy with a 20T or 22T swap.
let us know your experience with the 24T.

I found 48x22 to be a bit too low for riding in flat country. I can spin out 3rd easily and don't need a granny for hills. 48x20 is about right for me. In hilly country, I need all the hill climbing help I can get and will gladly give up some overdrive.

gster 10-14-18 05:56 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20615357)
I found 48x22 to be a bit too low for riding in flat country. I can spin out 3rd easily and don't need a granny for hills. 48x20 is about right for me. In hilly country, I need all the hill climbing help I can get and will gladly give up some overdrive.

I guess it all depends on your riding preferences and for some....
your age.
I just turned 59 (what happened?) and find 20T very comfortable.
3rd gear gets used more like 2nd.

tigervw78 10-14-18 09:31 AM

Thanks for the info everyone. I've got a 22T on the 72 Sports with flipped bars and a B17 narrow. I mainly use 2nd on that one. I also recently got a 74 Sports with B66 that I plan to leave original and riding upright with the 18T is tough. I was considering the 24T because I traverse this steep harbor bridge quite a bit and Memphis humidity is a killer. Ironically, we can get pretty strong winds as well. I'll be 48 in a few days and the knees aren't as strong as they used to be....

If I find that riding upright with 24T is too low, I ordered a 22T as well, so I'll swap them. Will let you know how it goes.

tigervw78 10-14-18 09:34 AM

The 60's I picked up, the bottom pump peg is bent. Is it possible to straighten without breaking? Also, are there any leads on pumps?

Thanks again for the help!


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