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-   -   Interesting finds around the web (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=929230)

carleton 08-17-15 09:47 AM


Originally Posted by queerpunk (Post 18081326)
Wiggo and Cav won the Madison at Revolution. Interestingly, Cav's on the UK superbike, and Wiggo is on a Cervelo (per Cervelo's new partnership with Team GB...).

Also interesting is Wiggo's use of sprint bars. Why did nobody say, "Hey, um, Bradley, enduros don't really use those anymore..."

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CMkKFDaU8AALWrn.jpg

Pics?

queerpunk 08-17-15 10:11 AM

lol.


http://i.imgur.com/gaf1NB3.png

carleton 08-17-15 10:25 AM

Ha!

I use lots of script blockers and whatnot. I guess that got blocked!!

Thanks!

gtrob 08-19-15 12:25 PM

Jr worlds results (just starting)

Veloresults Live Timing

Dalai 08-26-15 07:17 AM

Nice short video about racing at vélodrome Jacques-Anquetil in Paris.

https://vimeo.com/25639621

Dalai 09-01-15 10:28 PM

Another video. This time about Kissena.

http://video.newyorker.com/watch/notes-from-all-over-kissena-last-velodrome-in-new-york

dunderhi 09-02-15 06:08 AM


Originally Posted by Dalai (Post 18130680)

That was a great video! I spotted a couple of this forum's members in the vid.

BTW, I have also kicked my rear wheel sideways when when coming out of turn four. :eek:

taras0000 09-02-15 09:07 PM


Originally Posted by wens (Post 18080804)
I don't know anything about carbon specific molding, but my impression from working with die casting and injection molding tooling is that you can probably do it, but most of the time it's probably not much/any easier than just starting from scratch, unless you're only making small tweaks.

When Cervelo first came out with their P3C bike, I remember reading that they said they needed 5 separate pieces to make up the mold just for the rear triangle. Molds for carbon frames, being negative molds, it would only an insert to eliminate the bump on the headtube of the Axman.

taras0000 09-02-15 10:26 PM

Leave the Go-Fast wheels at home boys!

EB15: Birzman Guards Against Spray With World?s Most Aero Fender?

queerpunk 09-03-15 07:36 AM


Originally Posted by dunderhi (Post 18131049)
That was a great video! I spotted a couple of this forum's members in the vid.

BTW, I have also kicked my rear wheel sideways when when coming out of turn four. :eek:

me too... but i've also won races coming around somebody who hits the bump, gets freaked out, and stops sprinting!

theblackbullet 09-04-15 09:16 PM

pretty cool vid put together from this last weekend at the Dick Lane Velodrome!

https://vimeo.com/137861271

carleton 09-06-15 05:29 PM

Getting Better - best practices for your best practices

Peter Vint, Ph.D.
U.S. Olympic Committee
Senior Sport Technologist
Sport Performance Division


There are exactly two things which contribute more to the development of skill and human performance than anything else. These two things are practice and feedback. Without one, the other is ineffective and in some cases can be completely useless. And, it is important to note that not all types of practices and not all sources or methods of delivering feedback are equally effective. My talk today was designed to provide you with the most relevant, up-to-date understanding of how you can apply the most established principles of feedback and practice design to maximize the development of the athletes you coach.
http://www.usashooting.org/library/I..._25_Sep_09.pdf

Velocirapture 09-07-15 07:14 AM


Originally Posted by carleton (Post 18143213)
Getting Better - best practices for your best practices

Peter Vint, Ph.D.
U.S. Olympic Committee
Senior Sport Technologist
Sport Performance Division



http://www.usashooting.org/library/I..._25_Sep_09.pdf


Practise and feedback. Right on point, and so obvious its easy to miss.

Thanks, definitely going to read the full article

carleton 09-08-15 05:47 PM


Whats the single biggest mistake you see beginners make?
By Mark Rippetoe (love him or hate him):

They fail to understand that they are beginners. Novices, as we call them. They pick a routine out of a magazine based on what the guy doing it looks like, with no regard for the fact that they are not the same piece of physiology as the guy in the magazine. Training is physical activity designed to produce a specific response -- it is stress, recovery from that stress, and adaptation. People respond to a training program based on their own personal training history. The weaker you are, the more room you have to get strong, and the stronger you are through training, the harder it is to get stronger. Novices get strong faster than advanced lifters, so an advanced program is not the best for making the rapid gains possible for a novice. Time is wasted, potential is wasted.
Found at: /r/Fitness/comments/n13d8/i_am_mark_rippetoe_author_of_starting_strength/

queerpunk 09-09-15 08:20 AM

GUH, that is so right-on.

I see a lot of cyclists trying to train like pros, and I don't know why! Pros are freaks, outliers. We're ordinary, and shouldn't take our cues from outliers.

carleton 09-09-15 10:34 AM


Originally Posted by queerpunk (Post 18149761)
GUH, that is so right-on.

I see a lot of cyclists trying to train like pros, and I don't know why! Pros are freaks, outliers. We're ordinary, and shouldn't take our cues from outliers.

Yeah, it's easy to think that, "Chris Hoy* does X exercises. Chris Hoy is very fast. Therefore X exercises will also make me very fast."

*could be any world-class athlete

What they fail to consider is that Chris Hoy has been on a program for the last (literally) 20 years and what you just saw was what he does to train/tune his body in its current state.

So, the only way that the former logic holds up is if you are built exactly like Hoy and have done the same training that he has over the last 20 years. Anything short of that (which is everything), you are wasting your time thinking that you will have similar results.

The best advice to take from an athlete at that level is to: Do as they say, not as they do.

Edit:
This reminds me of another recent series of threads :D

VanceMac 09-09-15 02:15 PM


Originally Posted by queerpunk (Post 18149761)
I see a lot of cyclists trying to train like pros, and I don't know why! Pros are freaks, outliers. We're ordinary, and shouldn't take our cues from outliers.

Couldn't agree more, not only for reasons you and Carleton mention, but... my favorite is roadies who only do crits using the same hackneyed training philosophies/programs that seemingly all roadies use, and that have trickled down from elite endurance athletes doing pro tour stage races. Pros doing multiple consecutive climbing road races... so naturally those programs are heavily skewed toward JUST the aerobic engine. Guess what, if you're only doing cat 3 crits, you don't train like a pro stage racer doing consecutive road races. Result: all pack finishes and "I guess I'm just not a sprinter." Sigh.

700wheel 09-12-15 04:50 PM

Aerial shot of race night at the Boulder Valley Velodrome
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uXHf...ature=youtu.be

Dalai 09-12-15 08:51 PM

Nice 700wheel! Track looks great, especially after the setback with the flooding in 2013...

gycho77 09-13-15 12:39 PM

Found ultra rare mavic prototype track wheelset

http://pages.ebay.com/link/?nav=item...obalID=EBAY-US

Velocirapture 09-13-15 02:04 PM

The latest understanding of cramping (well, the first information that is more than just a guess/ anecdote, really...)


The Real Cause of Muscle Cramps | TrainingPeaks

The article itself:


[h=1]The Real Cause of Muscle Cramps[/h]Wednesday, July 29, 2015 | By Dr. Bob Murray



https://ci5.googleusercontent.com/pr...UBlkoXD5M.webp
https://ci5.googleusercontent.com/pr...o1Jog-JWcr.jpgIt feels as if you’ve been blind-sided. When a muscle painfully seizes up during training or competition, your forward motion comes to a screeching, and sometimes screaming, halt until the cramp subsides and you gingerly resume. Nearly everyone has experienced muscle cramps- a painful, involuntary, and sustained contraction of one or more muscles that can lead to the abrupt cessation of your physical activity. You may experience a lingering soreness, reduction in normal muscle function, and even signs and symptoms of muscle damage. You know the pain but what about the root cause of a cramp? You know the popular home treatments: bananas, salt pills and electrolytes. But what is the hard science of prevention and treatment? Scientists have started to solve the mystery of a condition as old as competition itself.
[h=2]Cramps Are Nothing New[/h]Not surprisingly, written accounts of muscle cramps date back at least a century[SUP]1[/SUP]. One thing is certain in history- muscles don’t cramp on their own.
The normal chain of events is that when you decide to move, your brain sends signals to nerve cells in your spinal cord that connect to your muscles. The stimulated muscles contract and off you go. When the nervous input to muscles ceases, so does muscle contraction. This simplified explanation leaves out many details, including the important fact that as muscles contract, a lot of information is sent from the muscles and their tendons back to the spinal cord to keep the central nervous system informed about joint position, muscle length, tendon tension, muscle temperature, and the surrounding chemical environment. Your body is a complex circuit board, constantly adjusting to new inputs.
[h=2]Cramps Are A Failure of Neuromuscular Performance[/h]When the neuromuscular system (your nerves plus muscles) works in sync, your exercise routine can continue for hours. You feel unstoppable. But when the system is perturbed by low blood glucose, muscle glycogen depletion, dehydration, accumulated muscle damage, high body temperature, severe salt loss, accumulation of metabolites, or reduced muscle blood flow, fatigue will gradually or suddenly sets in. The neuromuscular system becomes unstable. Muscle cramps are often associated with fatigue, a painful example of a failure in neuromuscular performance.
As a fuller picture of the etiology (cause) of muscle cramps is emerging through studies by researchers such as Dr. Rod MacKinnon, a Nobel Prize-winning neuroscientist, there are new insights that will help prevent or minimize cramps. First, the cramp is not your fault. Most likely, your cramp had nothing to do with preparation or fitness. As we’re learning, the breakthrough in solving the cramp mystery is in understanding the root of the problem. It’s not the muscle; it’s the nerve.
[h=2]It’s Not The Muscle; It’s The Nerve[/h]Skeletal muscle cells, as opposed to cardiac muscle cells in the heart and smooth muscle cells in the lining of blood vessels and the intestine, are under voluntary control. You will a muscle to contract and it obeys.
But all those hours you spent training can be for naught with just one ill-timed muscle cramp. You can’t finish a race or complete a training session. Regardless of the conditions that provoke it, muscles cramp because of hyper-excited nerves, alpha motoneurons to be more precise, the nerve cells that project from the spinal cord directly to many skeletal muscle fibers. The motoneuron and the connected muscle cells go haywire, the motor unit malfunctions. In the laboratory, muscles can be made to cramp by electrically stimulating motoneurons, a simple way to illustrate the point that your muscles are slaves to your nervous system.
[h=2]Maintaining Neuromuscular Performance[/h]Some important clues have surfaced over the past few years that lend support to the notion that “calming” hyper-excited nerves will prevent muscle cramps. An initial finding is that cramp-prone subjects require less electrical stimulation to produce a cramp, suggesting that their neuromuscular systems are more sensitive to cramping[SUP]2[/SUP]. This observation helps explain why some athletes are haunted by cramps, while others rarely have a problem.
There have been many proposed “cures” for muscle cramps, including eating mustard and drinking pickle juice. At first, the effectiveness of pickle juice baffled scientists, but laboratory studies confirmed its benefit, at least on small muscle groups in the foot that were electrically stimulated to cramp[SUP]3[/SUP]. Those results led scientists to speculate that pickle juice might activate sensory fibers in the mouth and throat and send signals to the nervous system that calm down hyper-exitable motoneurons and reduce the duration of a cramp.
This mouth-to-spine-to-muscle connection is not as far-fetched as it may sound. We have all experienced how the nervous system reacts to icy-cold drinks, acidic solutions such as pickle juice, and hot spices. For example, “brain freeze” often occurs as a result of quickly drinking ice-cold beverages because of rapid cooling of the sphenopalatine ganglion, a cluster of nerves adjacent to the roof of the mouth. For similar reasons, certain spices and other natural ingredients may be good anti-cramp candidates because spices such as capsaicin in red peppers activate specific membrane channels in sensory nerves called TRP channels that are found in the oropharyngeal region (mouth and throat) and esophagus that project to the spinal cord and indirectly inhibit hyper-excited alpha motoneurons.
This theory came to MacKinnon, who is an endurance athlete and sea kayaker himself, after a bout of debilitating cramps on the open ocean. The experience reminded him that, aside from being a painful nuisance, muscle cramps could mean the difference between life and death in some situations. MacKinnon won the 2003 Nobel Prize in chemistry for his work in understanding how channels in cell membranes work to move ions such as potassium from one side of a membrane to the other. Building on this, he reasoned that the right combination of natural TRP channels activators could switch on nerves that could in turn inhibit the over-active alpha motoneurons that cause cramping.
MacKinnon’s original idea has triggered a wave of laboratory and field research, with recent results demonstrating that the frequency and duration of cramps can be reduced when subjects ingest a specially formulated spicy beverage before exercise.
As a result of this research, we are coming closer to the understanding the true cause of cramping. So, while electrolytes, hydration, and fitness certainly matter for performance, athletes should not be looking to those elements to cure their cramping issue. As we continue to learn more about the root cause of cramps, we will also begin to understand how we can prevent them.
References
  1. Minetto MA, A Holobar, A Botter, D Farina. (2013) Origin and development of muscle cramps. Exerc Sports Sci Rev 41(1):3-10.
  2. Minetto MA, A Botter. Elicitability of muscle cramps in different leg and foot muscles. (2009) Muscle Nerve 40:535-544.
  3. Miller KC, GW Mack, KL Knight, JT Hopkins, DO Draper, PJ Fields, I Hunter. (2010) Reflex inhibition of electrically induced muscle cramps in hypohydrated humans. Med Sci Sports Exerc 42(5):953-961.

[h=1]ABOUT THE AUTHOR[/h]https://ci6.googleusercontent.com/pr...Fyw-ZxHUJh.jpgBob Murray, PhD, FACSM is managing principal of Sports Science Insights, LLC, a consulting group that assists companies and organizations in need of targeted expertise in exercise science and sports nutrition. SSI’s clients range from start-ups to Fortune 100 companies.
Prior to starting SSI, Dr. Murray was the co-founder and director of the Gatorade Sports Science Institute from 1985 to 2008. Dr. Murray’s research on the hydration needs of athletes and the physiological and performance responses to fluid, carbohydrate, and electrolyte ingestion has contributed to the broader understanding of the importance of being well hydrated during exercise.
Dr. Murray received his PhD in exercise physiology from Ohio State University, is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, and an honorary member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.


https://ssl.gstatic.com/ui/v1/icons/...s/cleardot.gif


gtrob 09-19-15 07:23 PM

Ever wonder what 100k of Mavics looks like...

http://i787.photobucket.com/albums/y...pscyx1kput.jpg

gtrob 09-19-15 07:24 PM

And can never have enough chain rings

http://i787.photobucket.com/albums/y...ps370jljzc.jpg

carleton 09-21-15 06:26 AM

If you are sprinting and you can feel your stem twisting, maybe you need a stiffer stem: https://fairwheelbikes.com/c/reviews...g/stem-review/

Of the stems mentioned in that article, I've used:

- Thomson X4 (favorite)
- 3T ARX (favorite)
- Thomson X2

But if you don't feel your stem flex, then save your money. You probably don't need the stiffest around. Stiff enough is stiff enough.

WhatsYoCadence 09-21-15 01:29 PM


Originally Posted by carleton (Post 18181211)
But if you don't feel your stem flex, then save your money. You probably don't need the stiffest around. Stiff enough is stiff enough.

Thanks for sharing Carleton.

Everyone, just remember those NJS guys race with 1" tiny flexy stems still and push monster watts out. I'd say get the X4 and call it a day. No need for the Pro track stem unless your upper body is that of 80's Schwarzenneger.

Soil_Sampler 09-21-15 05:35 PM

X4
 

Originally Posted by carleton (Post 18181211)
- Thomson X4 (favorite)

+1

700wheel 09-21-15 09:35 PM


Originally Posted by carleton (Post 18181211)
If you are sprinting and you can feel your stem twisting, maybe you need a stiffer stem: https://fairwheelbikes.com/c/reviews...g/stem-review/

Of the stems mentioned in that article, I've used:

- Thomson X4 (favorite)
- 3T ARX (favorite)
- Thomson X2

But if you don't feel your stem flex, then save your money. You probably don't need the stiffest around. Stiff enough is stiff enough.

I agree with using the stiffest stem. However my guess is that most bars will flex more than the stem; has anyone done research on bars as was done on stems?

gtrob 09-21-15 09:56 PM

road bars

https://fairwheelbikes.com/c/reviews...dlebar-review/


Its interesting to see that carbon bars do well, as they should if designed correctly, even though a lot people would think otherwise. The super light carbon bars Ive owned flex a lot, especially compared to some of the beefier aero bars I run now.

brawlo 09-21-15 11:43 PM

Also consider that there could be a significant amount of flex coming from the steerer tube, especially if it's a carbon offering

dunderhi 09-22-15 05:37 AM

On my primary track bike I have the Pro Carbon Sprint Stem with the Pro Vibe Track bar which makes for a pretty stiff cockpit. I also have the standard Pro stem with the Pro track bars on another bike, which isn't as stiff, but that bike has a old-style quill steel steerer, so it's an apples to oranges comparison.


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