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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

ThermionicScott 11-19-17 05:08 PM

Yeah, put in some earplugs before inflating those tires "HARD". :thumb:

Charmlessman 11-19-17 05:46 PM

Front tire went from 20 to 50. Rear tire went from 10 to 48. It took longer than the front one to get there.. There is no way I was going to get to 90. Thank you all

SirMike1983 11-19-17 08:18 PM

Located a set of 1947 Schwinn Continental wheels to replace the standard steel ones I built with 1950s parts for this 1941 Schwinn New World. The Continental wheels come with really nice, stainless steel rims; aluminum front hub with oiler; and double-butted spokes. This was a premium wheelset in the 1940s. Sturmey AW hub has October 1947 date code.

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Z-XHo-Ojv...119_152340.jpg

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/--UKSsF99_...119_152353.jpg

https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Qlc4ASnLo...119_155453.jpg

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-UZqh3_3sy...119_155502.jpg

Ballenxj 11-19-17 08:43 PM


Originally Posted by SirMike1983 (Post 20003394)
Located a set of 1947 Schwinn Continental wheels to replace the standard steel ones I built with 1950s parts for this 1941 Schwinn New World. The Continental wheels come with really nice, stainless steel rims; aluminum front hub with oiler; and double-butted spokes. This was a premium wheelset in the 1940s. Sturmey AW hub has October 1947 date code.

Very nice all the way around. :thumb:

johnnyspaghetti 11-19-17 10:19 PM


Originally Posted by Charmlessman (Post 20003081)
Front tire went from 20 to 50. Rear tire went from 10 to 48. It took longer than the front one to get there.. There is no way I was going to get to 90. Thank you all

I don't know if those tires are manufactured to handle 60 psi. they must have some sort of max pressure on the sidewall perhaps it is a metric measurements "KPA" or"BAR" on the sidewall that would need to be converted PSI equivalents. Some simple tire air gauges have multi-type presssure readings. Check the tire for a KPA or BAR inflation number.You are most likely safe at 50 PSI.
That bike was stored well looks to be in great preserved shape, but hubs & Headset, the bottom bracket all need lubrication.
These should be oiled sooner than later if you need to use this for 8 mile rides to work. The hubs are easy to oil The headset can be oiled flipping the bike over.
You can get oil down to the crank through the seat post tube.
These are only temporary lubrication band-aids and these components all need dissasembly-cleaning & fresh grease when re assembled.
Then you can search for YouTube videos to restore the grease hubs & other individual components for your Raleigh.

Charmlessman 11-20-17 01:56 PM


Originally Posted by johnnyspaghetti (Post 20003608)
I don't know if those tires are manufactured to handle 60 psi. they must have some sort of max pressure on the sidewall perhaps it is a metric measurements "KPA" or"BAR" on the sidewall that would need to be converted PSI equivalents. Some simple tire air gauges have multi-type presssure readings. Check the tire for a KPA or BAR inflation number.You are most likely safe at 50 PSI.
That bike was stored well looks to be in great preserved shape, but hubs & Headset, the bottom bracket all need lubrication.
These should be oiled sooner than later if you need to use this for 8 mile rides to work. The hubs are easy to oil The headset can be oiled flipping the bike over.
You can get oil down to the crank through the seat post tube.
These are only temporary lubrication band-aids and these components all need dissasembly-cleaning & fresh grease when re assembled.
Then you can search for YouTube videos to restore the grease hubs & other individual components for your Raleigh.

I pour a few drops of motor oil in the rear hub. I flipped over the bike and (newbie here) cant seem to find a place where to add oil for the headset.

I am ordering Salmon Kool Stops today from Amazon, looks like Bike Barn near me does not have any in stock. I have been reading a lot of the threads and is it correct to order the Continental Kool Stop? or do you guys have any recommendation?

I have been using aluminum foil and water in the meantime to remove as much rust as possible.

plympton 11-20-17 02:22 PM

Ok, need a little help with my hubs. I have a 52 hub and a ?49? hub. I say 49 because all the components on the bike indicate that it's a 49 but the hub itself has no date. I took both hubs apart cleaned them replaced planet gears and axle keys, lock washers. Oiled with 30wt motor oil, greased bearings and bearing seats and reassembled. but, The 52 did not have an indicator when I bought it so when I went to Harris Cycle I bought three. As i was putting the 49 together I found that the old indicator that was in the 49 is shorter than the one's that Harris said would suit the 52. Now I don't know? Second, How do I tell if it is shifting properly while it is in my hand? I pull the chain and move the sprocket but what does that tell me? And C, As I watch reassembly videos I see that the sprocket goes on cupped out, the 49 was the other way. What's up with that? So do I have the right indicator for the 52 (I thinks it's a hsa125)? Should I reuse the short one for the ?49? hub? And what about the sprocket facing in/facing out?

johnnyspaghetti 11-20-17 02:48 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by Charmlessman (Post 20005073)
I pour a few drops of motor oil in the rear hub. I flipped over the bike and (newbie here) cant seem to find a place where to add oil for the headset.

I am ordering Salmon Kool Stops today from Amazon, looks like Bike Barn near me does not have any in stock. I have been reading a lot of the threads and is it correct to order the Continental Kool Stop? or do you guys have any recommendation?

I have been using aluminum foil and water in the meantime to remove as much rust as possible.

This is helpful link. There are many links you can look up this one bearings get cleaned & greased which lasts much longer than oiling.
http://johns-recycled-bicycle.blogsp...storation.html
Attachment 589596 This is the lower bearing race on the larger tube on the fork it is above the frt brake. This race takes the brunt of the weight load on this bearing set. Flip the bike over & oil between the race & the cup pressed into the frame do this to the upper bearing as well. The oil will run around and seep into the bearing races.
Be careful of the trigger shifter on the bars when flipping it over.

clubman 11-20-17 02:48 PM

I'm not sure why they changed the length of the indicator but as long as the chain section properly turns the corner on the indicator nut you should be good. You can't tell if the hub shifts well until mounted in a bike, under load. The sprockets are cupped to allow you to move the chainline if needed.

Salubrious 11-20-17 02:50 PM

The cup or offset in the sprocket is simply there to allow you to correct the driveline from the chain. You put it whatever way makes for the straightest line from chainwheel to sprocket.

clubman 11-20-17 02:56 PM

Oh, I think the change in indicator length may have to do with the switch from threaded to splined drivers. Maybe.

plympton 11-20-17 03:17 PM

slow learner: The 49 axle is 5 3/4 and the 52 axle is 6 1/2 thus the different indicator length. Thank you all and know I understand the sprocket.

nlerner 11-20-17 03:19 PM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 20005268)
Oh, I think the change in indicator length may have to do with the switch from threaded to splined drivers. Maybe.

That makes sense, but I have a bunch of indicators in my parts bin, and it seems like there are lots of lengths! But the hub doesn't really care; just makes the usual means of adjustment a bit tricky.

johnnyspaghetti 11-20-17 03:33 PM


Originally Posted by Charmlessman (Post 20005073)
I pour a few drops of motor oil in the rear hub. I flipped over the bike and (newbie here) cant seem to find a place where to add oil for the headset.

I am ordering Salmon Kool Stops today from Amazon, looks like Bike Barn near me does not have any in stock. I have been reading a lot of the threads and is it correct to order the Continental Kool Stop? or do you guys have any recommendation?

I have been using aluminum foil and water in the meantime to remove as much rust as possible.

The front hub has a oil port in the middle of it under the metal band that covers it it will just slide over to the side and add oil.

Charmlessman 11-20-17 05:17 PM


Originally Posted by johnnyspaghetti (Post 20005386)
The front hub has a oil port in the middle of it under the metal band that covers it it will just slide over to the side and add oil.

Just added oil there too. I am planning to ride it tonight and see how that goes. Thanks

BigChief 11-20-17 06:16 PM


Originally Posted by plympton (Post 20005339)
slow learner: The 49 axle is 5 3/4 and the 52 axle is 6 1/2 thus the different indicator length. Thank you all and know I understand the sprocket.

If you want replacement indicators search eBay for Sturmey Archer HSA 125 for 5 3/4" axles and HSA 126 for the 6 1/4"there's plenty of them available.

Charmlessman 11-20-17 06:47 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I dont know if the tire was like this when I picked up the bike or if this happened after I inflated the tire to 48psi. Both tires had cracks on the sides when I picked it up.

arty dave 11-20-17 07:42 PM

Damn, it's always a shame when original tyres wear out. This exact thing has happened to me before to nice looking old dunlop tyres. And then others will be perfectly OK. But if they're like this on the outside, they're likely to have dried out in the casing to, and you'll be more likely to have some kind of failure.
Time to order a new pair and save yourself the worry of them giving out while you're riding. A new pair will last you a good long while. The following is advice I found for car tyres, but applies equally to bike tyres:

To protect your tires over time, pay attention to the substances and conditions your tires are exposed to. Avoid the following:

Abrasive or corrosive chemicals, such as pool treatment chemicals, motor oil, and industrial cleaning solutions
Excessive or direct sunlight that exposes the tires to harmful UV rays
Extremely low temperatures
High temperatures
Long periods of disuse
Ozone generated by electrical equipment
Underinflation

BigChief 11-20-17 07:59 PM

Looks like you need new 26x 1 3/8 (590mm) tires.
26 x 1 3/8 inch (590 mm) Bicycle Tires from Harris Cyclery

gster 11-20-17 08:03 PM


Originally Posted by Charmlessman (Post 20005820)
I dont know if the tire was like this when I picked up the bike or if this happened after I inflated the tire to 48psi. Both tires had cracks on the sides when I picked it up.

New tires are cheap and worth putting on.
I would recycle the old tubes as they seem to hold air better than modern ones.

johnnyspaghetti 11-20-17 08:34 PM


Originally Posted by Charmlessman (Post 20005820)
I dont know if the tire was like this when I picked up the bike or if this happened after I inflated the tire to 48psi. Both tires had cracks on the sides when I picked it up.

Its getting ready to blow up. Get a new tire and save the tube from being unpatchableable after it blows. Be sure the tire is metric size is 37-590 there are many 26 X 1 3/8th sizes and that won't fit the Sturmey Archer rim.

https://www.niagaracycle.com/categor...-gum-wall-k830

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Sunlite-T...&wl13=&veh=sem

I have three sets of these tires on Sturmey Archer rims. They seem good for a cheaper tire Max pressure is 55 psi.

I have a set 70 psi CityRide tire made buy Continental that are very nice but you'll pay $20 or more each for them. There are nice tires out there sized ISO (37 590). These Continental Cityride tires are very nice I am finding I like the comfort of 55 psi better than 70psi I am a little shy of 200lb weight. I also wanted to avoid putting $50 in tires on a $40 dollar bike.
https://www.ebay.com/i/272632731310?chn=ps&dispctrl=1


https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/f83...7&odnBg=ffffff

gster 11-20-17 08:41 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20005978)
New tires are cheap and worth putting on.
I would recycle the old tubes as they seem to hold air better than modern ones.

I usually slightly over inflate my tires to 55-60 to account for loss with modern tubes,
Top up every couple of weeks.

Charmlessman 11-20-17 09:00 PM

Just ordered the tires, brake pads and a couple of tools.

I will check the tubes and see if hopefully they are reusable.

gster 11-20-17 09:38 PM


Originally Posted by Charmlessman (Post 20006095)
Just ordered the tires, brake pads and a couple of tools.

I will check the tubes and see if hopefully they are reusable.

Money well spent.
I've owned a lot of crappy cars over the years.
They've always had good rubber and brakes.

johnnyspaghetti 11-20-17 10:20 PM


Originally Posted by Charmlessman (Post 20006095)
Just ordered the tires, brake pads and a couple of tools.

I will check the tubes and see if hopefully they are reusable.


Now you can clean & grease up at least the frt. hub and you won't have to oil it anymore for a long time.
Study doing that. Oil is good but gets messy.

BigChief 11-20-17 10:25 PM


Originally Posted by Charmlessman (Post 20005073)
I pour a few drops of motor oil in the rear hub. I flipped over the bike and (newbie here) cant seem to find a place where to add oil for the headset.

I am ordering Salmon Kool Stops today from Amazon, looks like Bike Barn near me does not have any in stock. I have been reading a lot of the threads and is it correct to order the Continental Kool Stop? or do you guys have any recommendation?

I have been using aluminum foil and water in the meantime to remove as much rust as possible.

Yes, it's the Continental Kool Stops you want. I can't help but rave over the salmon Kool Stops. These are, hands down the best brake pads I have ever used.

BigChief 11-20-17 10:36 PM


Originally Posted by johnnyspaghetti (Post 20006263)
Now you can clean & grease up at least the frt. hub and you won't have to oil it anymore for a long time.
Study doing that. Oil is good but gets messy.

We should mention this when somebody is new to Raleighs. The front hub is different than any other you may be familiar with. It has a fixed cone and an adjustable cone. The axle has a shoulder on one side. Screw the fixed cone ( the one without the flats) all the way down against the shoulder then use the cone with the flats to set your adjustment. Here's the important bit...Always install the front wheel with the fixed cone on the bikes right side.
Oh, and the hub uses loose bearings. Be ready for them to fall out when you unscrew the cone. They are 3/16"

Charmlessman 11-20-17 10:42 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20006293)
I always mention this when somebody is new to Raleighs. The front hub is different than any other you may be familiar with. It has a fixed cone and an adjustable cone. The axle has a shoulder on one side. Screw the fixed cone ( the one without the flats) all the way down against the shoulder then use the cone with the flats to set your adjustment. Here's the important bit...Always install the front wheel with the fixed cone on the bikes right side.
Oh, and the hub uses loose bearings. Be ready for them to fall out when you unscrew the cone. They are 3/16"

Pretty new to all of this but I will check a few videos and hope for the best.

Tires and pads wont get here til 11/29 so as soon as I get the tools I will start removing parts.

jon.612 11-21-17 05:58 AM

For the rear hub, the manufacturer's recommendation is one my favourite things I've ever read in a technical manual. I don't recall the year, but they recommend "two teaspoons of oil per fortnight". Of course this assumes you're parking it on a gravel driveway where the extra oil can drip.

clubman 11-21-17 06:33 AM


Originally Posted by jon.612 (Post 20006532)
For the rear hub, the manufacturer's recommendation is one my favourite things I've ever read in a technical manual. I don't recall the year, but they recommend "two teaspoons of oil per fortnight". Of course this assumes you're parking it on a gravel driveway where the extra oil can drip.

Yeah that was for a new hub or unknown old hub that hadn't been used in some time. As you say, you'd have quite a mess after a couple of months. :)


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