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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

gster 04-06-20 11:51 AM


Originally Posted by oldveloman (Post 21403291)
Hi dweenk, the tool was only suitable for use on the left hand side cup, as there was no means of screwing a bar into the inner bush to clamp it onto the frame,
so I bored a hole and cut M8 thread in it. Now it can be used on both sides.

Here' s a quick drawing:


https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...55ae28204b.jpg
Enjoy,

Peter

Hozan Bottom Bracket Tool
A friend of mine gave me one of these..
I rarely remove the fixed cup.
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b0487e4101.jpg
In fact, the only one I've removed was from a 1930 Hercules and it practically slipped out....
Different alloys back then.
In fact, the whole bike (including cotters) came apart without any fuss.

JoshuaTSR 04-06-20 02:25 PM

I finally pumped some air into my old tires on my 1948 Humber Sports and did a quick test ride since the tires are dry rotted and the brakes are hard as rocks so I disconnected them. Bike rode ok but I think that it's not for me. I really like my banana seat ride so I'll be posting up my ride for sale. The front dyno works and so do the headlight and taillight. Has a brooks saddle and the 3 speed needs some work but it kind of works. Would asking $300 be too much? I'll try to take some pics for you guys but she has ape hanger handlebars from Raleigh I think.

Also I'm just trying to post more so I can do PM's with folks.

tincup 04-06-20 04:53 PM


Originally Posted by buck mulligan (Post 10436477)
When I get discouraged about the rebuild I'm doing - all the work, all the challenges - it's threads like this one that renew my motivation. Thanks, all!

i'm stocking up on inspiration right now because I'm about to embark on my first rebuild. browsing all the picture threads to give me courage!

gster 04-06-20 06:57 PM


Originally Posted by tincup (Post 21404176)
i'm stocking up on inspiration right now because I'm about to embark on my first rebuild. browsing all the picture threads to give me courage!

It might be easier to build a "rider" first.
A show bike can be a bit overwhelming and expensive.
A lot of the bikes here are long term projects.
I like to get a bike on the road asap and then upgrade as time and money permit.
It's mostly labour to take apart clean and re assemble.
new tires, brake pads and chain are reasonable.
A nice leather saddle can be the biggest expense.
Post some photos as you progress.

JoshuaTSR 04-06-20 08:24 PM

Man I just looked at my bike and it's a 4 speed and not a 3 speed. I didn't know that they made those.

Ged117 04-07-20 06:24 AM


Originally Posted by JoshuaTSR (Post 21404503)
Man I just looked at my bike and it's a 4 speed and not a 3 speed. I didn't know that they made those.

Post some photos if you can of the whole bike, decals, and drive-side. A few pics of the four-speed hub would be cool as well. I have a '53 four-speed hub built into a 700c wheelset for my '70s Peugeot IGH conversion. It is a really good hub when set up correctly.

JoshuaTSR 04-07-20 07:57 AM

My 1948 4 speed
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...47ac6f18d2.jpg
https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...de5e3779f9.jpg
Wide bars
https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...d670361c64.jpg
I love that this works still and lights up the front and rear lights.
https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b8fc86795a.jpg
4 speed glory
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3f06b96dde.jpg

bluesteak 04-07-20 12:22 PM

Benelux deraileur
 

Originally Posted by PeterLYoung (Post 21275056)
Yes I am sure 700c wheels will work OK though they will be about 26-3/4" dia overall with tyres so will require brake blocks to be about 3/8" higher than for 26" wheel, many frames can accommodate this.
I have a couple of 1950's road bikes that were designed for 27" wheels which are normally on them but I have alternative 700c wheel sets I can put in them and then I have to lower the brake block FCC s around 4mm when to align to the braking surface when using them.
If you are using a Cyclo Benelux Mk 7 derailleur, I have 4 Speed one on a 1950's Dayton Roadmaster running 27 x 1" wheels and freewheel bottom gear has 22 teeth (top gear is 16T) which it manages easily, not sure you could go more than that. I have a 46T Chainwheel.

I started to work on the hopper, and have built wheels. I went with sun cr18 590 rims. I am working on the drivetrain now. The deraileur is stamped 3/32 5 speed, 1/8 4 speed. If I buy a 4 speed freewheel do I assume it will be for 1/8 chain? The other problem I am having is the bottom bracket only protrudes 1 inch on the drive side instead of 1.25 inches. What is with that? I will need to replace it to fit a “normal” chainring.

Any thoughts or advise would help.

Sorry to horn in on the 3 speed conversation, with deraileur questions.

PeterLYoung 04-07-20 01:09 PM


Originally Posted by bluesteak (Post 21405572)
I started to work on the hopper, and have built wheels. I went with sun cr18 590 rims. I am working on the drivetrain now. The deraileur is stamped 3/32 5 speed, 1/8 4 speed. If I buy a 4 speed freewheel do I assume it will be for 1/8 chain? The other problem I am having is the bottom bracket only protrudes 1 inch on the drive side instead of 1.25 inches. What is with that? I will need to replace it to fit a “normal” chainring.

Any thoughts or advise would help.

Sorry to horn in on the 3 speed conversation, with deraileur questions.

just noticed your post, if it helps I am running 3/32” chain on my 4 speed derailleur with the Cyclo Benelux Mk 7. The bike is circa 1955 or earlier Dayton Roadmaster. It works OK.

c0rbin9 04-07-20 03:17 PM

<3 Sturmey Archer 3-speed hubs, the shifting feel is so smooth compared to derailleurs.

clubman 04-07-20 03:41 PM


Originally Posted by JoshuaTSR (Post 21405023)
My 1948 4 speed
https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...47ac6f18d2.jpg

Wide bars

I love that this works still and lights up the front and rear lights.

4 speed glory

That crankset has me befuddled. Looks like a 70's chainwheel. Did you add it?

thorstein 04-07-20 04:46 PM

grease AW bearings
 
I've got a '69 AW on my Raleigh Twenty. When coasting it sounds a little loud, so I added quite a bit of oil. The sound has gone down a bit, but I realized it might need grease in the bearings instead of oil in the gears as my '74 AW on my Tourist is much smoother/quieter.

Does anyone know how easy it is to just grease the bearings & not overhaul the whole hub? Shifting is smooth & accurate.

JoshuaTSR 04-07-20 05:00 PM

No I didn't add it. Most of these bikes have a chain guard that covers everything so you don't see it. I like the way it looks, like people holding hands in peace.

JoshuaTSR 04-07-20 05:04 PM

The tires are old schwinn breeze 26 x 1 1/4 though, does anyone have a good line on tires for these bikes?

JoshuaTSR 04-07-20 05:31 PM

Ok guys what's the correct tire size? My rear tire is a uniroyal straight side that says 26x1 3/8 but it also says fits EA-1 and schwinn s-6 times while my front tire is a schwinn breeze sports touring 26x1 1/4.

If I can do the 1 3/8's then I'll just grab some cheap Walmart tires just so I can ride. What do you think?

gster 04-07-20 07:36 PM


Originally Posted by JoshuaTSR (Post 21406124)
Ok guys what's the correct tire size? My rear tire is a uniroyal straight side that says 26x1 3/8 but it also says fits EA-1 and schwinn s-6 times while my front tire is a schwinn breeze sports touring 26x1 1/4.

If I can do the 1 3/8's then I'll just grab some cheap Walmart tires just so I can ride. What do you think?

26 x 1 3/8 will not fit an EA1 Rim.
You want to order the Schwinn specific tires they're the only ones that fit and are reasonably priced.
https://www.amazon.ca/Kenda-Schwinn-...6309555&sr=8-8
It's a somewhat obsolete tire size but these fit EA1 rims nicely.
Those rims indicate yours was probably a Club Bike

gster 04-07-20 07:46 PM

Clubman's correct, he usually is.
The chain ring has been swapped out at some point in the last 72 years...
Your bike would make a good Scorcher.
Add some inverted low bars , or upright bars for a Semi Scorcher.

jackbombay 04-07-20 08:48 PM


Originally Posted by thorstein (Post 21406053)
Does anyone know how easy it is to just grease the bearings & not overhaul the whole hub? Shifting is smooth & accurate.

Its not bad, if you clamp one end of the axle in a bench vice you can clean and repack the top end, then flip it over and do the other side. There are 2 sets of bearing to clean and regrease on the drive side as the piece driven by the cog spins at different rates than the hub shell.

Remove the cog to start and looses the non drive side lock nut and conea half turn or so.

I start with the drive side sticking up, remove the locknut, then the locking washer that keeps the cone from rotating, then remove the cone, there is a spring that will extend out of the hub as you unscrew the cone, that can stay on the axle. With the cone off you can pull the driver out, and you'll see a bunch of 1/8" (I think) bearings that the driver spins on there are dust shields on the axle bearing and the driver bearings that can be pried off with a medium sized flat blade screwdriver, the larger diameter dust shield for the driver bearings should be pried off arond the outside edge, not by rying across the whole things as that tends to bend them.

Clean both cup and cones regrease and reassemble, BUT when you reassemble the axle bearing should be screwed down hand tight, then backed off 1/4 turn then the cone lock washer gets installed, then instal/tighten the lock nut, you are now done on the drive side.

Flip the wheel and remove the locknut and cone from the non drive side, the dust shield will pry off like the drive side, clean and regrease then reinstall the cone and lock nut, NOTE: the hub adjustment is atypical, the hub should be the tiniest bit loose when adjusted correctly.

That should do it.

thorstein 04-07-20 09:22 PM


Originally Posted by jackbombay (Post 21406495)
Its not bad, if you clamp one end of the axle in a bench vice you can clean and repack the top end, then flip it over and do the other side.
...
That should do it.

Thanks for the detailed response. Now I'll have to get up the courage to dig in! Messing with these internal hubs make me nervous!

jackbombay 04-07-20 09:28 PM


Originally Posted by thorstein (Post 21406551)
Thanks for the detailed response. Now I'll have to get up the courage to dig in! Messing with these internal bubs make me nervous!

For anything inside the hub to move/come apart you have to unscrew the planetary "cassette" as a unit from the drive side of the hub, just regreasing bearings is pretty straightforward :-)

Road Fan 04-08-20 04:15 AM


Originally Posted by JoshuaTSR (Post 21403908)
I finally pumped some air into my old tires on my 1948 Humber Sports and did a quick test ride since the tires are dry rotted and the brakes are hard as rocks so I disconnected them. Bike rode ok but I think that it's not for me. I really like my banana seat ride so I'll be posting up my ride for sale. The front dyno works and so do the headlight and taillight. Has a brooks saddle and the 3 speed needs some work but it kind of works. Would asking $300 be too much? I'll try to take some pics for you guys but she has ape hanger handlebars from Raleigh I think.

Also I'm just trying to post more so I can do PM's with folks.

I’ll be eager to see your pics, so keep posting!

clubman 04-08-20 05:01 AM


Originally Posted by JoshuaTSR (Post 21406082)
No I didn't add it. Most of these bikes have a chain guard that covers everything so you don't see it. I like the way it looks, like people holding hands in peace.

Yes it's a Humber chainring, those are usually referred to dancing people. Regarding price, it depends on your market. An incomplete bike certainly won't get $300 anywhere. The lack of original chainring doesn't help either. As gster suggests, those are tough tires to find. The 26 x 1 3/8 - EA1 -S6 is a US sizing and you'll have to find the Schwinn specific tires I think. There were a few Dunlops that had the same markings that you refer to but they're not common. You want a 597 mm bead, NOT a 590.
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...eee1a788aa.png

gster 04-08-20 07:23 AM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 21406800)
Yes it's a Humber chainring, those are usually referred to dancing people. Regarding price, it depends on your market. An incomplete bike certainly won't get $300 anywhere. The lack of original chainring doesn't help either. As gster suggests, those are tough tires to find. The 26 x 1 3/8 - EA1 -S6 is a US sizing and you'll have to find the Schwinn specific tires I think. There were a few Dunlops that had the same markings that you refer to but they're not common. You want a 597 mm bead, NOT a 590.
https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...eee1a788aa.png

Here's my 1955 Humber Sports Club Bike fitted with those S-6 tires or K23 (Kenda)
It has the maypole chainring.
https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...90275d85fe.jpg
https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...f02b3c5669.jpg
here's Clubman's sizing chart.
https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...e862e7b0f1.jpg

thorstein 04-08-20 08:16 AM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 21406989)
Here's my 1955 Humber Sports Club Bike fitted with those S-6 tires or K23 (Kenda)
It has the maypole chainring.
https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...90275d85fe.jpg

here's Clubman's sizing chart.

That is a nice looking bike! Between the color, the chain ring, long chain stays, and the double fork blades - wow! Looks like it would be a fun ride!

gster 04-08-20 08:25 AM


Originally Posted by thorstein (Post 21407070)
That is a nice looking bike! Between the color, the chain ring, long chain stays, and the double fork blades - wow! Looks like it would be a fun ride!

Thanks. This photo is before the new tires were fitted.
Truth is , I can't really ride a bike with drop bars.
I need to sit up reasonably straight....


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