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big john 10-03-22 11:45 AM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22667294)
I know it's complicated, but any chance you can find a way to downsize and stay in the same general area?? I would rather live in a tiny house in paradise than a mansion in hell. Buffalo.

I would think that any house in a nice part of the bay area would be well over $1million. I would rather live in rural Oregon or Washington than Buffalo. Maybe even North Carolina, where there seems to be houses around $200k.

phrantic09 10-03-22 11:46 AM


Originally Posted by Trsnrtr (Post 22667299)
My preparation for Winter is to switch from road to mtb pedals on my bikes

I donít even do that

big john 10-03-22 11:47 AM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22667310)
Well, we're already in a 1600 sq.ft. ranch house, so there's not a lot of downsizing left. At the moment, Mrs. GJ keeps finding LARGER houses Back East. I think she has to go through the "House I've Always Wanted" stage, which I went through a year or so ago. The thing is, where we are is perfect in a way that even moving a little bit would wreck it, and not even gain us much in affordability. Even moving 20 miles inland, the summer temps are WAY higher, for example. Move toward the coast, and it's a LITTLE cheaper but you could go weeks without seeing the sun.

Why does she want a larger house?

Eric F 10-03-22 11:50 AM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22667305)
The fact that it broke in the middle of the spoke would make me agree that a rock damaged it. I have dings in the rims from rocks but haven't broken a spoke on my 27.5 wheels yet. Broke a rim, sure. I think it had 9 cracks around the spoke holes.

How many spokes on those wheels? Mine are 28 for some reason and 35mm internal width. Odd combination.

My wheels are 24F/28R, 23mm internal. At ~1300g, they are lighter than the Enve 3.4s on my road bike.

big john 10-03-22 11:51 AM


Originally Posted by phrantic09 (Post 22667317)
I donít even do that

A guy came on our club ride Saturday with mtb shoes and pedals. His first time with us. He sat straight up and rode like he was on a mountain bike and he was an absolute ox, always at the front on climbs. Big guy but chiseled. I asked and he said he rode mtb a lot and just recently dusted off his old road bike.

big john 10-03-22 11:55 AM


Originally Posted by Eric F (Post 22667326)
My wheels are 24F/28R, 23mm internal. At ~1300g, they are lighter than the Enve 3.4s on my road bike.

I don't know what my mtb wheels weigh. I wondered if a set of cf wheels and 2.3 tires would make slogging up climbs easier. The Maxxis 2.8s on there are about 830 grams, plus the big tubes.
My Gunnar road bike wheels are about 2000 grams and the wheels on the Seven can't be much lighter, maybe 1800?

LesterOfPuppets 10-03-22 12:02 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22667315)
I would think that any house in a nice part of the bay area would be well over $1million. I would rather live in rural Oregon or Washington than Buffalo. Maybe even North Carolina, where there seems to be houses around $200k.

I just saw a REALLY nice fixer upper in Rocky Mount for only $50k or so. Unfortunately Rocky Mount is on the sweaty side of NC, not the more pleasant mountainous side. One benefit for me is I like the style of BBQ they do on the sweaty side of the state better than the stuff they do on the hilly side :)

LesterOfPuppets 10-03-22 12:03 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22667332)
I don't know what my mtb wheels weigh. I wondered if a set of cf wheels and 2.3 tires would make slogging up climbs easier. The Maxxis 2.8s on there are about 830 grams, plus the big tubes.

Tubes in 2.8s???? Gasp.

In related news, I'm happy to report I didn't need to use the gigantic tube I hauled across Washington with me, and I only had to dig for lube in the trashcan at one O'Reilly's.

Eric F 10-03-22 12:16 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22667332)
I don't know what my mtb wheels weigh. I wondered if a set of cf wheels and 2.3 tires would make slogging up climbs easier. The Maxxis 2.8s on there are about 830 grams, plus the big tubes.
My Gunnar road bike wheels are about 2000 grams and the wheels on the Seven can't be much lighter, maybe 1800?

Lighter wheels/tires definitely make a difference for climbing. I'm running 2.25s tubeless on my hardtail, and they're plenty for me, but I'm a wheels-on-the-ground kind of rider who tends to look for the smooth line. If you're a bash-through-it rider on a FS, you might want more tire.

genejockey 10-03-22 12:21 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22667319)
Why does she want a larger house?

Well, part of planning to be Equity Pirates is just how much cheaper housing is anywhere else. The local real estate market REALLY distorts you view of things! Apparently the median sale price in San Mateo this year is 1.8 Million, and San Mateo is not one of the fanciest suburbs. So, when you see a 2500 sq ft house, with 4BR and 2.5BA for $350K, it seems like pocket change. AND there's a phase that I went through, where the houses that caught my interest were essentially the kind of house I always wanted I was young and dumb. So, for example, I spent about 2-3 weeks totally obsessed with a big brick house in the same county where I grew up, which had balconies, and high ceilings, and a grand staircase, and even a back staircase (for the servants). It was built before the Civil War! It was gorgeous! And only $210K!!!

BUT totally impractical! Especially for a retired couple - 11 foot ceilings are great LOOKING, but you pay to heat 5' of head space you don't really inhabit. Those big windows look wonderful, but they're single-pane, wood-framed casement windows that probably leak like a sieve. A grand staircase is great, but there are SO MANY STEPS, because of the high ceilings. The there are questions like how do you air condition ALL THAT SPACE, including the 5 ' of headspace on the first floor. Then there's the location - a small town which is losing population and is a good 20 miles in any direction from hospitals, healthcare, any good sized grocery store, etc.

So, of course, we didn't buy it. Not that we were ever going to. But I kind of had to go through that whole thought process a couple times to exorcise the whole "House You Always Wanted" thing from my thinking. Now, I looking at places more in terms of actually living in them as increasingly old people. No small towns, no big houses.

indyfabz 10-03-22 12:24 PM

Finally got around to making a map of my actual tour route up to the point where I broke my seat post collar bolt.

Ride with GPS | Bike Route Planner and Cycling Navigation App

That odd "loopage" around the Bellfonte/Bald Eagle area represents some shopping. etc., mileage I did after going to the park office to register, riding to the primitive camping area, which is miles from the park office and then heading into town for groceries, all before my rest day the next day. Odometer read 502 miles at time of bolt breakage. The discrepancy can be explained by, among other things, the mileage I put in during my day off, which included a ride back to the main part of Bald Eagle State Park for a shower and lunch down by the beach while I charged the phone and external battery.

genejockey 10-03-22 12:27 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22667315)
I would think that any house in a nice part of the bay area would be well over $1million. I would rather live in rural Oregon or Washington than Buffalo. Maybe even North Carolina, where there seems to be houses around $200k.

I'd be okay with more rural, but Mrs. GJ is afraid of feeling too isolated. This is one reason why she keeps thinking Buffalo - she has two friends there - a roommate from college and her best friend from high school. She's not really close to either anymore, but really, she hasn't moved anywhere where she didn't know at least someone since she went to college - and met me the first week.

phrantic09 10-03-22 12:49 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22667329)
A guy came on our club ride Saturday with mtb shoes and pedals. His first time with us. He sat straight up and rode like he was on a mountain bike and he was an absolute ox, always at the front on climbs. Big guy but chiseled. I asked and he said he rode mtb a lot and just recently dusted off his old road bike.

Most of the guys I ride with use crank bros pedals.

phrantic09 10-03-22 12:50 PM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22667386)
I'd be okay with more rural, but Mrs. GJ is afraid of feeling too isolated. This is one reason why she keeps thinking Buffalo - she has two friends there - a roommate from college and her best friend from high school. She's not really close to either anymore, but really, she hasn't moved anywhere where she didn't know at least someone since she went to college - and met me the first week.

Buffalo really isnít the ****-hole people make it out to be. Couple of friends of ours lived there a number of years and really miss it.

yah the snow sucks, but thatís pretty much anywhere near the great lakes

Eric F 10-03-22 12:58 PM

Before I rode on Saturday, I did what bampilot06 was talking about last week with tipping his levers inwards (ala Remco, etc.) just to give it a try. I have to say, I think I like it. It creates a slightly more comfortable wrist angle, and doesn't at all impinge brake/shifter use. I'm going to stick with it for now.

datlas 10-03-22 01:06 PM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22667310)
Well, we're already in a 1600 sq.ft. ranch house, so there's not a lot of downsizing left. At the moment, Mrs. GJ keeps finding LARGER houses Back East. I think she has to go through the "House I've Always Wanted" stage, which I went through a year or so ago. The thing is, where we are is perfect in a way that even moving a little bit would wreck it, and not even gain us much in affordability. Even moving 20 miles inland, the summer temps are WAY higher, for example. Move toward the coast, and it's a LITTLE cheaper but you could go weeks without seeing the sun.

Can you simply stay where you are??

#inertia

big john 10-03-22 01:18 PM


Originally Posted by genejockey (Post 22667375)
Well, part of planning to be Equity Pirates is just how much cheaper housing is anywhere else. The local real estate market REALLY distorts you view of things! Apparently the median sale price in San Mateo this year is 1.8 Million, and San Mateo is not one of the fanciest suburbs. So, when you see a 2500 sq ft house, with 4BR and 2.5BA for $350K, it seems like pocket change. AND there's a phase that I went through, where the houses that caught my interest were essentially the kind of house I always wanted I was young and dumb. So, for example, I spent about 2-3 weeks totally obsessed with a big brick house in the same county where I grew up, which had balconies, and high ceilings, and a grand staircase, and even a back staircase (for the servants). It was built before the Civil War! It was gorgeous! And only $210K!!!

BUT totally impractical! Especially for a retired couple - 11 foot ceilings are great LOOKING, but you pay to heat 5' of head space you don't really inhabit. Those big windows look wonderful, but they're single-pane, wood-framed casement windows that probably leak like a sieve. A grand staircase is great, but there are SO MANY STEPS, because of the high ceilings. The there are questions like how do you air condition ALL THAT SPACE, including the 5 ' of headspace on the first floor. Then there's the location - a small town which is losing population and is a good 20 miles in any direction from hospitals, healthcare, any good sized grocery store, etc.

So, of course, we didn't buy it. Not that we were ever going to. But I kind of had to go through that whole thought process a couple times to exorcise the whole "House You Always Wanted" thing from my thinking. Now, I looking at places more in terms of actually living in them as increasingly old people. No small towns, no big houses.

When I lived in the mountains with my ex we had an 1100 sq ft house and it was big enough. 2 story with no garage but storage underneath. Of course, she wasn't a hoarder like the one I live with now,(or hoarder in training.)
I was thinking of moving back to that area and some of the houses have stupid high ceilings. We used firewood and a propane furnace for heat and never needed a/c.

big john 10-03-22 01:20 PM


Originally Posted by phrantic09 (Post 22667408)
Most of the guys I ride with use crank bros pedals.

You use the same pedals for road or gravel rides?

big john 10-03-22 01:26 PM


Originally Posted by Eric F (Post 22667366)
Lighter wheels/tires definitely make a difference for climbing. I'm running 2.25s tubeless on my hardtail, and they're plenty for me, but I'm a wheels-on-the-ground kind of rider who tends to look for the smooth line. If you're a bash-through-it rider on a FS, you might want more tire.

When I got the bike I wanted traction for places like Cheseboro and also wanted the forgiving suspension to compensate for my lack of judgement. I have to say the thing has saved me from my mistakes more than once.

Now I mostly do rides where even a hardtail would be fine. Buy a hardtail or make my existing bike more climb friendly? Just live with it?

big john 10-03-22 01:29 PM


Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets (Post 22667347)
Tubes in 2.8s???? Gasp.

In related news, I'm happy to report I didn't need to use the gigantic tube I hauled across Washington with me, and I only had to dig for lube in the trashcan at one O'Reilly's.

It's amazing how much heavier they are than 2.4 tubes, and, with a spare, I am carrying 3 of them.

phrantic09 10-03-22 01:35 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22667436)
You use the same pedals for road or gravel rides?

Same pedals, I have Keo and SPD pedal bodies for my Garmin pedals. I donít swap out the bodies unless itís going to be a muddy ride, which is really only spring up here. In the winter, the dirt is frozen. thereís also no need for much hike-a-bike around here. With a 31/34 granny gear I can get up pretty much anything.

datlas 10-03-22 01:53 PM

So with VERY LITTLE FANFARE, the CDC updated its masking guidelines for healthcare facilities. They say if community level of covid is "HIGH" they still recommend masking in all heath-care settings. If it's NOT high, they say it's optional and up to the discretion of the facility. Our level is currently "Medium" so I think it makes sense to allow patients and staff to decide on their own if they want to mask or not. However, it's up to authorities higher than me to make that decision. Stay tuned.

Eric F 10-03-22 01:58 PM


Originally Posted by big john (Post 22667441)
When I got the bike I wanted traction for places like Cheseboro and also wanted the forgiving suspension to compensate for my lack of judgement. I have to say the thing has saved me from my mistakes more than once.

Now I mostly do rides where even a hardtail would be fine. Buy a hardtail or make my existing bike more climb friendly? Just live with it?

The right answer is always buying another bike. ;)

Reducing rotational weight, especially at the perimeter of your wheels, is the best place to lose weight...as long as it isn't costing you a level of bash-resistance you require. That said, I'm guessing you can probably do just fine on something around 2.4. Regardless of any other change, the biggest issue with climbing will always be gravity.

phrantic09 10-03-22 02:05 PM


Originally Posted by datlas (Post 22667474)
So with VERY LITTLE FANFARE, the CDC updated its masking guidelines for healthcare facilities. They say if community level of covid is "HIGH" they still recommend masking in all heath-care settings. If it's NOT high, they say it's optional and up to the discretion of the facility. Our level is currently "Medium" so I think it makes sense to allow patients and staff to decide on their own if they want to mask or not. However, it's up to authorities higher than me to make that decision. Stay tuned.

All of our hospitals / clinical settings are going to require masks regardless of recommendations for now. Our non clinical locations and HQ are ďoptionalĒ

big john 10-03-22 02:05 PM


Originally Posted by phrantic09 (Post 22667457)
Same pedals, I have Keo and SPD pedal bodies for my Garmin pedals. I donít swap out the bodies unless itís going to be a muddy ride, which is really only spring up here. In the winter, the dirt is frozen. thereís also no need for much hike-a-bike around here. With a 31/34 granny gear I can get up pretty much anything.

I used SPD mountain bike pedals and shoes on the road for a few years. Had a sole crack across under the cleat and rode it like that for months. I think this might have contributed to the problems with my feet. I switched back to Look Delta pedals with Shimano shoes and my feet hurt less. Still use the SPD off road.

I'm actually thinking of trying flat pedals for the mtb.


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