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-   -   Totally Tubular (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=154679)

obrentharris 03-06-24 09:47 AM


Originally Posted by MooneyBloke (Post 23175226)
A dried out casing may indeed give a false indication, but I try to touch up areas like that with latex emulsion because the bare casing is more prone to abrasion damage. In any case, pinching the tread around the bubbles should give you an idea where the damage lies.

Please share your source for liquid latex. In decades gone by I used the Jevelot product which came in a small jar that was good for many applications. Alas, Jevelot and Hugh Enochs are no more. I'd appreciate any lead on a substitute. I tried using tire sealant but it didn't adhere as well as my memory of the Jevelot product.
Brent

MooneyBloke 03-06-24 10:34 AM


Originally Posted by obrentharris (Post 23176460)
Please share your source for liquid latex. In decades gone by I used the Jevelot product which came in a small jar that was good for many applications. Alas, Jevelot and Hugh Enochs are no more. I'd appreciate any lead on a substitute. I tried using tire sealant but it didn't adhere as well as my memory of the Jevelot product.
Brent

The stuff I use is Val-A Tear Mender which is a light natural latex emulsion much like the Tire Life product.
I also use this to stick the base tape back down after restitching cotton sew-ups. The main issue with either of these is the rather short shelf life once opened; in my experience, the rubber tends to fall out of suspension over time. Evidently carpet layers use some sort of latex emulsion as well, but I've not had any experience here. If you investigate this and can let me know of a good brand, I'd be very interested especially if it's cheaper than the Tear Mender.

Let me state loudly that I've never found a good base tape repair adhesive for Conti Sprinters. Those seem to be a one-and-done tire unless you like riding on dicey base tape.

pastorbobnlnh 03-06-24 05:31 PM

I finally had a chance to test-ride my sealant filled Schwalbe One tubular. 20 miles and no air loss! The ride also gave me a chance to check the road worthiness of the leather handlebar bag I just completed. More on the new bag can be found in the DIY Bag thread.
https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...637e8af6eb.jpg
As mounted on my '71 P13 Paramount with other leather projects.

smontanaro 03-06-24 06:26 PM


Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh (Post 23176910)
More on the new bag can be found in the DIY Bag thread.

This was news to me. I couldn't find it with a few searches. Got a link?

pastorbobnlnh 03-06-24 06:56 PM


Originally Posted by smontanaro (Post 23176955)
This was news to me. I couldn't find it with a few searches. Got a link?

DYI bag making thread.

JohnDThompson 03-07-24 08:42 AM


Originally Posted by obrentharris (Post 23176460)
Please share your source for liquid latex. In decades gone by I used the Jevelot product which came in a small jar that was good for many applications. Alas, Jevelot and Hugh Enochs are no more. I'd appreciate any lead on a substitute. I tried using tire sealant but it didn't adhere as well as my memory of the Jevelot product.
Brent

Here's one option:
https://m.media-amazon.com/images/I/...L._SL1500_.jpg
https://www.amazon.com/Liquid-Latex-...r_1_18?sr=8-18

MooneyBloke 03-07-24 05:38 PM

I suspect theatrical makeup latex would bit a bit too thick much like mold makers latex.

Biker Pete 03-07-24 06:38 PM

Hey, sorry, this question is probably answered somewhere in this long thread, but are 22-23mm silk tubular tires with latex inner tubes for the road still being made? I’m in the US. Thanks in advance.

seagrade 03-07-24 08:39 PM


Originally Posted by Biker Pete (Post 23178004)
Hey, sorry, this question is probably answered somewhere in this long thread, but are 22-23mm silk tubular tires with latex inner tubes for the road still being made? I’m in the US. Thanks in advance.

Available direct from FMB in France…

https://fm-boyaux.cc/en/route/28-82-.../36-largeur-22

No affiliation.

Biker Pete 03-08-24 07:43 AM


Originally Posted by seagrade (Post 23178105)
Available direct from FMB in France…

https://fm-boyaux.cc/en/route/28-82-.../36-largeur-22

No affiliation.

Excellent…….thanks!

squirtdad 03-12-24 12:56 PM


Originally Posted by Biker Pete (Post 23178004)
Hey, sorry, this question is probably answered somewhere in this long thread, but are 22-23mm silk tubular tires with latex inner tubes for the road still being made? I’m in the US. Thanks in advance.

rene herse has fmb https://www.renehersecycles.com/shop...-700c-x-23-mm/

Biker Pete 03-13-24 04:55 PM


Originally Posted by squirtdad (Post 23182434)

Thank you!

Biker Pete 03-23-24 02:36 PM


Originally Posted by seagrade (Post 23178105)
Available direct from FMB in France…

https://fm-boyaux.cc/en/route/28-82-.../36-largeur-22

No affiliation.

Got them, I’ll install them soon!

Biker Pete 03-31-24 07:31 AM


Originally Posted by seagrade (Post 23178105)
Available direct from FMB in France…

https://fm-boyaux.cc/en/route/28-82-.../36-largeur-22

No affiliation.

I read on the FMB and René Herse websites that these tires are hand made in a small shop in Brittany, France. Yet on the tires I received directly from FMB there is embossed an inscription in English: “Made in Thailand”. Hmmm.

https://cimg6.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...64089f7ef.jpeg

Classtime 03-31-24 02:11 PM

Just the tread?

Biker Pete 03-31-24 07:15 PM


Originally Posted by Classtime (Post 23200874)
Just the tread?

Possibly. I’ve inquired with FMB.

pastorbobnlnh 04-01-24 05:58 AM

It is interesting that the FMB website describes their tires as "...hand built in France...," and not "hand made." Of course, they can source supplies and materials internationally, which we can now assume the tread originates in Thailand. This is not surprising.

What is your impression of the quality and "build" of the FMB tires compared to other tubulars you have owned?

Aubergine 04-01-24 08:34 AM


Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh (Post 23201414)

What is your impression of the quality and "build" of the FMB tires compared to other tubulars you have owned?

I am using a set of 28 mm wide FMB tubulars on my ~1975 Gitane Fédéral. Lovely tires, seem comparable to old Clément silk Campionato del Mondo tires.

Biker Pete 04-01-24 08:37 AM


Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh (Post 23201414)
It is interesting that the FMB website describes their tires as "...hand built in France...," and not "hand made." Of course, they can source supplies and materials internationally, which we can now assume the tread originates in Thailand. This is not surprising.

What is your impression of the quality and "build" of the FMB tires compared to other tubulars you have owned?

I did hear back from FMB and it turns out the tread on the tire model I ordered is in fact sourced from Thailand, with the assembly being done by hand in FMB’s shop. And coincidentally the treads used on all of their other models are manufactured in-house.

The FMB tires look to be very nicely made. The silk casing threads look to be very fine compared to one other silk tire I’ve used (Challenge ‘Criterium’), just as described on the René Herse website for FMB tires. I look forward to getting these new tires mounted and going on my first ride! (the bike is a 1975 Motobecane Grand Record with Super Champion ‘Competition’ rims)

equinoxranch 04-01-24 07:44 PM

The tread is made in Thailand, shipped to Herse, where they then apply same to their assembly. I miss silk (Del Mondos), but have found a more than adequate (cotton) marque to ride, now for over thirty years..... One blessing - and not because of the cotton casing, they are highly puncture/cut resistant due to a layer of kevlar under the v. grippy non existent tread. Have not had a flat in nearly thirty years........ I can live with that.......

Force 04-03-24 03:39 PM


Originally Posted by equinoxranch (Post 23202212)
The tread is made in Thailand, shipped to Herse, where they then apply same to their assembly. I miss silk (Del Mundos), but have found a more than adequate (cotton) marque to ride, now for over thirty years..... One blessing - and not because of the cotton casing, they are highly puncture/cut resistant due to a layer of kevlar under the v. grippy non existent tread. Have not had a flat in nearly thirty years........ I can live with that.......

What tires are you using?

Atlas Shrugged 04-03-24 03:46 PM


Originally Posted by equinoxranch (Post 23202212)
The tread is made in Thailand, shipped to Herse, where they then apply same to their assembly. I miss silk (Del Mundos), but have found a more than adequate (cotton) marque to ride, now for over thirty years..... One blessing - and not because of the cotton casing, they are highly puncture/cut resistant due to a layer of kevlar under the v. grippy non existent tread. Have not had a flat in nearly thirty years........ I can live with that.......

Wow! I am lucky if I made it 30 days.

bykemike 04-04-24 05:00 AM

I had a rear flat on my Riite cross bike the other day and decided to finally go tubeless. I had tubeless ready rims and tires so the swap was just a couple of Stans valves and 4 oz of Stan's liquid, Went very quick and easy.

The tires are Bontrager 40's so they are not really street tires despite the fact I have come to prefer this bike for most of my general riding and use it as a street bike. Max pressure in the tires is 60 psi.

I get the look from some of my riding friends, Not everyone is thinking this is a good idea I can tell.

Am I in for issues I am not anticipating? I have tubeless on my Scott Scale and have had zero issues with them over years of riding it, the tires self heal all the time and don;t think about flats on that bike. Is there a big difference between the 18 psi I run in the Scott and the 60 psi I run in the Ritte?

I'm thinking I will carry a mini plug kit and a couple of larger size co2 cartridges and be fine.

hazetguy 04-04-24 09:44 AM


Originally Posted by bykemike (Post 23204656)
I had a rear flat on my Riite cross bike the other day and decided to finally go tubeless. I had tubeless ready rims and tires so the swap was just a couple of Stans valves and 4 oz of Stan's liquid, Went very quick and easy.

The tires are Bontrager 40's so they are not really street tires despite the fact I have come to prefer this bike for most of my general riding and use it as a street bike. Max pressure in the tires is 60 psi.

I get the look from some of my riding friends, Not everyone is thinking this is a good idea I can tell.

Am I in for issues I am not anticipating? I have tubeless on my Scott Scale and have had zero issues with them over years of riding it, the tires self heal all the time and don;t think about flats on that bike. Is there a big difference between the 18 psi I run in the Scott and the 60 psi I run in the Ritte?

I'm thinking I will carry a mini plug kit and a couple of larger size co2 cartridges and be fine.

this thread is for tubular tire discussions, not about tubeless. you can probably find the answers you are looking for in the multitude of tubeless tire threads.

equinoxranch 04-05-24 10:45 AM

Responding to FORCE :

I try to avoid mentioning any brand (marque) of anything......, any product whenever possible. I v. much have my preferences based on years of exposure, experience and am intransigent regarding same....... But I again try to avoid making brand suggestion of anything..... That said. Given my background, I only know sew ups when it comes to tires and I will never change for all the right reasons...... So much BS is being forced upon the public now. Case in point : They're claiming that clinchers are better than sew ups. [moderator edit]

I ran Clement for so many years. Phenomenal tires and always with Clement "Red" mastic. Well, both, alas, are gone. But....... Many years ago, starting with track, rotating over to road, also....., I acquainted myself with Continental tires. They are exceptional. Really well designed, made. Their road "Sprinter" in "Black Chili" compound is to die for. They ride v. well and with the protective kevlar strip, as I alluded, I have not had a flat in over twenty plus/thirty years with them. I run them at 80psi/6bar. No higher on road. I only use Vittoria Mastik One as glue (as same IS measurably superior to Continental glue which IS junk) and employ the age old European track method of application........ This IS superior to the wayward "glue the tire, glue the rim, wait for several hours THEN mount" method. I will be more than happy to explain that (European track/road) method if anyone wants to go the superior and quicker aforementioned route........

Fredo76 04-05-24 12:21 PM


Originally Posted by equinoxranch (Post 23205993)
... I will be more than happy to explain that (European track/road) method if anyone wants to go the superior and quicker aforementioned route........

I'll bite.

What is the European track/road method?

79pmooney 04-05-24 12:45 PM


Originally Posted by Fredo76 (Post 23206102)
I'll bite.

What is the European track/road method?

I duck-ducked "tubular european track/road method". Among other useful hits, I got "Finite element analysis of tubular track system". Everything you ever wanted to know about:

The Tubular Track (TT) railway system is a twin beam modular railway system consisting of two

reinforced concrete (RC) beams on which steel rails are continuously supported.

Yes, trains are the other super efficient transportation system but I really just want to know how to stick my tires on right. :)

Biker Pete 04-06-24 10:04 AM

Got the FMB silks installed. Great impression from my first 20 mile ride!
https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...32731d88e.jpeg

SJX426 04-08-24 09:07 AM

Good looking Moto!
Like the crank too! Geared for Florida.

Biker Pete 04-08-24 12:59 PM


Originally Posted by SJX426 (Post 23208552)
Good looking Moto!
Like the crank too! Geared for Florida.

Yes, swapped out the original 14-26 Maillard freewheel for an NOS 13-21 Regina Oro. Works great here in the flatlands of Florida!


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