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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=623699)

BigChief 04-12-18 09:28 AM


Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln (Post 20279739)
I have just purchased something similar, with the original fork and chrome crown cap, and the head tube badge nice, but I think not the Rudge pattern chainwheel, which I don't know why. Maybe I can dig one up, somewhere. I'll need similar extra lift at the seat and stem, but yours looks fine that way, maybe it has to do with the absence of the chainguard and fenders. I doubt the wheels are as perfect as the ones on yours, so most likely it will get CR18s. (I'm intrigued with the notion of going 700C.) But I have a project bike ahead of it so the Rudge will most likely get taken apart for storage in the closet until next winter.

Raleigh started using the standard chainring on their captive brands in the 60s. Too bad really, the distinctive chainrings are such a big part of their charm. If you really want a Hand of Ulster chainring, you could get into this bidding war.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Rud...4AAOSwxfdayUsI

thumpism 04-12-18 09:37 AM


Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln (Post 20279801)
It is a shame the owner is so hard-nosed.

In fairness, I did not speak with the owner; I spoke with a young guy manning the shop who had to call her to ask about the price. The woman is in business to make money and she does not see this little Herc as a "nice little bike that should be saved from terminal exposure," she sees it as a "midcentury modern artifact that would be a rare and tasteful design element" and has priced it accordingly. To her it's like the old washboards and metal feed signs you see on the walls of folksy restaurants. I understand that. But unless she thinks it will become more attractive to shoppers the longer it degrades in her side lot, she's a fool not to entertain an approach by someone with an obvious interest in its purchase.


Maybe she just hates the bike or hates having to deal with them as part of the business. Lord knows, when you're not actually riding a bike it really can be a cumbersome device. Believe me, I know. We have 12 in the household right now and certainly do not need another.

Chaser95 04-12-18 10:08 AM

uh oh, I am rapidly approaching 20 here and I thought things were still under control. Like yesterday, I found a Puch built JC Higgins three speed and bought it because it had a good B-66 on it. That's ok........right?

paulb_in_bkln 04-12-18 10:54 AM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20279928)
Raleigh started using the standard chainring on their captive brands in the 60s. Too bad really, the distinctive chainrings are such a big part of their charm. If you really want a Hand of Ulster chainring, you could get into this bidding war.

So Raleigh did not treat all its children the same. Disappointing. They stuck with the heron chainwheel much longer; my '72 has it. Maybe a bargain will come my way. Thanks for this information.

paulb_in_bkln 04-12-18 10:56 AM


Originally Posted by thumpism (Post 20279946)
she does not see this little Herc as a "nice little bike that should be saved from terminal exposure," she sees it as a "midcentury modern artifact that would be a rare and tasteful design element" and has priced it accordingly. To her it's like the old washboards and metal feed signs you see on the walls of folksy restaurants.

Then not hard-nosed so much as maybe not understanding accurately the market for her merchandise.

BigChief 04-12-18 12:12 PM


Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln (Post 20280149)
So Raleigh did not treat all its children the same. Disappointing. They stuck with the heron chainwheel much longer; my '72 has it. Maybe a bargain will come my way. Thanks for this information.

Yes, they did keep the heron chainrings and thimble forks on the Raleigh badged bikes to the bitter end. I think the first brand Raleigh swallowed up was Robin Hood. It remained their budget brand. For a while, other brands they acquired got first class treatment. They kept their traditional distinctive chainrings and forks. Even things like the Humber duplex forks. They took special care of Rudge. The 51 I'm working on came with all the premium goodies. Brooks saddle, stainless spokes, Raleigh pattern rims, single bolt levers, rubber case reflector and Dyno hub. It has the traditional Rudge oval fork crown and distinctive chrome cap. And of course, the Hand of Ulster chainring. In the 60s, they started cutting back on these things by using standard parts. It got to the point where the only difference between a Rudge, Hercules, Humber or Phillips was the badge and a couple transfers. Still great bikes, but I do think it was misplaced economy. One of my favorite all time chainrings was the Humber running man.

paulb_in_bkln 04-12-18 04:12 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20280369)
One of my favorite all time chainrings...

I certainly did find the right bike forum!

arty dave 04-12-18 04:35 PM


Originally Posted by SirMike1983 (Post 20279252)
Out and about on the Raleigh export model roadster this evening.

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-yKS-0uQx3...411_185909.jpg

It's hard to pick a favourite from Sir Mikes stable, but for me this stands out because of the particular shade of green, that in this image looks black...And because it's a DL-1 :) Sir Mike, is that one of your minnehaha bags? Nice fit on the rack.

johnnyspaghetti 04-12-18 07:30 PM

My eyes are wide open

Chaser95 04-12-18 10:10 PM

Very nice! Beautiful and classic........

Dewey101 04-12-18 10:22 PM

I changed the tube on the rear wheel of my wife’s Raleigh Sports 3-speed tonight. The first time I’ve needed to do that on a 3-speed Sturmey wheel in 34 years! Glad I kept some of my bike tools all those years. Had to start unscrewing the gear indicator chain retaining nut with needle head pliers as it was seized, was glad rim strip came with the tube as it was a burred spoke head that was the cause. Had a head-scratching moment when I put everything back together and heard a rubbing sound - turned out the chain was rubbing against the bike stand. Sense of accomplishment.

dweenk 04-13-18 02:30 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Armstrong step through in Dover, DE. It is a bad backlit photo, but there are a couple of other pix. I've seen this bike on CL for a while, so the seller may take less.
https://delaware.craigslist.org/bik/...554928206.html

BigChief 04-13-18 03:06 PM

A nice Robin Hood in New Hampshire. Looks sharp in gold with a chrome fork. Never seen that before.

https://nh.craigslist.org/bik/d/vint...556757746.html

Chaser95 04-13-18 03:26 PM


Originally Posted by dweenk (Post 20282635)
Armstrong step through in Dover, DE. It is a bad backlit photo, but there are a couple of other pix. I've seen this bike on CL for a while, so the seller may take less.
https://delaware.craigslist.org/bik/...554928206.html

I am trying to learn to "eyeball" frames for size. This looks like a 19 to me. How am I doing?

gster 04-13-18 03:59 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20282701)
A nice Robin Hood in New Hampshire. Looks sharp in gold with a chrome fork. Never seen that before.

https://nh.craigslist.org/bik/d/vint...556757746.html

Nice bike, fair price. I suspect the forks have been replaced.

paulb_in_bkln 04-13-18 03:59 PM


Originally Posted by Dewey101 (Post 20281489)
I changed the tube on the rear wheel of my wife’s Raleigh Sports 3-speed tonight. The first time I’ve needed to do that on a 3-speed Sturmey wheel in 34 years! Glad I kept some of my bike tools all those years. Had to start unscrewing the gear indicator chain retaining nut with needle head pliers as it was seized, was glad rim strip came with the tube as it was a burred spoke head that was the cause. Had a head-scratching moment when I put everything back together and heard a rubbing sound - turned out the chain was rubbing against the bike stand. Sense of accomplishment.

Please, Master, tell me your secret for going 34 years without a rear flat. My lips will be sealed. Promise.

BigChief 04-13-18 04:54 PM


Originally Posted by gster (Post 20282828)
Nice bike, fair price. I suspect the forks have been replaced.

Ah yes, good spotting. Not the correct fork. That explains why I haven't seen it before!

boattail71 04-13-18 05:50 PM


Originally Posted by Salubrious (Post 20264028)
The 6-point crank was introduced in 1972 but the 9 point crank continued to show up into early 1973.

Sal, can you give us pics/examples of the six/nine cranks? Thanks!

clubman 04-13-18 05:51 PM

Fork looks to be a 700c or 27" size. Top tube slopes backward.

clubman 04-13-18 06:03 PM


Originally Posted by boattail71 (Post 20282987)
Sal, can you give us pics/examples of the six/nine cranks? Thanks!

Here you go...extra web creates a 9 point.
http://www.kurtkaminer.com/TH_raleigh_cranks.jpg

BigChief 04-13-18 06:15 PM


Originally Posted by brianhamp (Post 20282989)
Here is a picture of my 1975 Raleigh Wayfarer.2 New tires, new chain,new cables and brake calipers.Serviced Sturmey Archer AW 3 speed , Serviced front Sturmey Archer Dyno hub with headlight and tail light. I added a rack on the back for my saddle bags.I think this might become a daily rider.I was trying to modernize it with newer hubs and crank-set however it just didn't look right too me so I kept it the way I got it!!

Beautiful roadster and good call on keeping the heron crank. With new grease and bearings, these can be just as smooth as a modern crank. It's just a matter of a few ounces of weight. They add so much charm to these old bikes.

boattail71 04-13-18 06:20 PM


Originally Posted by BigChief (Post 20264324)
For myself, I like having 3 or 4 different bikes that I rotate for my daily rides. It makes cycling more fun for me to change bikes from time to time. And then, I love having a project going on in my workshop. I have fun solving all the problems and puzzles that come along. I especially enjoy rescue projects where a useless bike gets put back on the road again. This leaves me with the only part of the hobby I don't enjoy. Moving them along. It's a pest that I tend to ignore until REALLY have to make more room. So, bikes come and go, but I do have a few keepers.
You did a great job on that green 20. I have fun seeing other people's projects too and that was a good one.

Big, I feel your aspiration/enjoyment/pain and it reminds me... I just finished two three-speeds. These with the Shimano coasters with the one front hand brake. One is an early '80's Schwinn World Tourist, the other, don't laugh, a '70's Free Spirit Brittany. I have been commuting on them to get them "dialed in" and am becoming a fan - ya, the Sears FS rides great! Both of these bikes ride great and I will be sad to let them go; they have been my go-to commuters this winter. But here's my problem: On a whim last week, I jumped on my early '60's Hercules for a quick dash to the hardware store and 'bout ran the light at the end of my street as I couldn't get that (not there) coaster to engage. Yikes!

Anyone appreciate of what I speak or deem me a hapless sort?

boattail71 04-13-18 06:23 PM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 20283001)
Here you go...extra web creates a 9 point.
http://www.kurtkaminer.com/TH_raleigh_cranks.jpg

Thanks, Club! Glad I asked. I don't think I've ever noticed the 6/9 difference (or maybe all my Raleighs were older?). The 9 was a 1970's design - came out in '73?

boattail71 04-13-18 07:24 PM


Originally Posted by arty dave (Post 20267203)
I think this was also the problem with the TCW, that was fixed with the introduction of the S3C.

Actually I quite like coaster brakes but haven't had one since I was a kid. My wife has an Electra Mod 3i, and the coaster brake is really nice. Fun bike, with a quite sufficient & smooth rollerbrake up front.

I am a fan of the S3C. As a tinkerer of all bikes (speeds of 1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 12... can I stop?) with brakes of all sorts (don't get me started). Optimistically thinking, you kinda get the best of both worlds with the SC3 don't you? Of course, as long as you don't forget that you don't have that rear caliper. Oh, and when you change to a regular AW or derailleured bike, that you don't have that solid and sure coaster brake to "back" on. Oh, and you can't free-pedal back-pedal at a 10-o'clock position at a stop light - there's that. Alas. Regardless, I appreciate them all.

One of my "next" bikes I'll install that rear caliper on a classic roadster coaster 3-spd to help alleviate that cursed muscle-memory-bike-swap problem that can happen.

boattail71 04-13-18 08:29 PM


Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln (Post 20271706)
I never have and still do not understand the mega-buck wheel enthusiasm. Even with much loaded touring riding, a pair of Nashbar (Nashbar!) wheels from the early 90s that hardly cost anything still run perfect on one of my bikes.

Paul, can you expound? Firstly, what is the aforementioned "Sta-Tru 590 alloy front wheels?" Does this equate to what my tire size that says "26 x 1 3/8?" And will a said alloy rim work with my stock of 26" x 1 3/8" tires?

Also, if I'm understanding you, I would agree that alloy wheels from the '90s would be an appreciable betterment in performance. Especially if you care to eschew originality and save that (rolling) weight. So, if I'm getting your drift, why splurge on modern, new and expensive wheels for a rescued vintage (non-performance) ride if 1990's wheels/rims are available? Right? So, if I'm still correct in my reasoning here, what "modern" (1990's) alloy rims will fit my Raleigh/Robin/Herc/etc? IOWs, when I visit my local co-op, and the myriad wheel cache, what should I look for?

If I'm all-wet here, set me straight. Regardless, I will, as a rule, never think to replace those classic steel, original rims on my prizes, but I might, just maybe, experiment with myriad, and unoriginal projects be-damned.


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